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Rodney Miller

FZ07 is beating me

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Rodney Miller

So I've had the FZ since October. I have 2 major issues and 1 minor with the bike.

 

First, anything above 5000 RPM and my hands go numb after 15 mins or so. I also ride a wr450f supermoto that vibes a lot more but doesn't make my hands numb so I don't think it's a grip tightness issue. 

 

Second, I'm heavier guy (I guess) at 230lbs fully geared. So when I grab the front brake with moderate force the nose of the bike dives hard and slams me into the tank. I've contemplated wearing a cup, seriously. 

 

Third, the brakes are mushy. It's minor and I'm sure better pads and steel lines would fix this issue. 

 

Now I get that this is a somewhat budget bike but the hands going numb is a real concern. I'd like to take longer trips but right now it would be dangerous for me to do so. I've stumbled across a brand new 2017 FZ09 that is little over 7k out the door. I don't know that I need the power increase but the traction control, adjustable suspension, and abs would be nice features. Or is it worth dropping the 2k (just an estimate) in new bars, forks, and other things to deal the 07 into a more ideal bike for me? Any thoughts or experiences would be greatly appreciated. 

 

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pattonme

you're looking at 1000 to fix the suspension. bar vibes I can't help you with. Maybe put a chunk of that ball you're hugging on the handlebar ends?

Maybe get some tungsten weights from an AR15 buffer and shove those into the bar ends with a rubber 'cork'? 

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robbo10

Isn't the bike just not for you? The person to bike weight ratio might seem to be against you. I had a TDM 900 and had to let it go because of my age and my lack of heft. I could see you on that sort of bike. (No offence intended, BTW!)

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minkster

Putting risers on the handlebars might shift your weight back on your rear instead of on your hands.  You will need to get the seat to a local upholstery shop so the seat doesn't push your nuts into the tank and so it's more comfortable.  Fork dive takes some getting used to.  Setting the rear suspension to around 8 might help the ride.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Phoenix-Products-Handle-Yamaha-PP-10350/dp/B00T6JIDHI

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Beemer

I bought these grip puppies and they help with vibration. they're super cheap and if they don't work then you haven't wasted too much money. You may like them regardless, they feel good with their cushioning.

 

https://www.amazon.com/Grip-Puppy-Comfort-Grips-Original/dp/B005C1U8R2/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1520350702&sr=8-2&keywords=grip+puppies+motorcycle

 

 

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AlbatrossCafe

I'm 6'2" and about 250lbs with gear.

 

I got new front suspension with adjustable shocks and much stuffer springs, as well as just a stiffer spring over the OEM rear shock. This basically cured nose dive. I feel I can stop much more quickly now. But yeah, that is gonna cost you over a grand especially if you don't want to do the work yourself.

 

For vibration, either get weighted bar ends or (cheaper and better effect overall) Renthal ultra-low handlebars: https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/renthal-street-handlebars-78

 

I have tried both. The weighted bar ends were fine, but the riding position of the ultra-low handlebars for a taller guy like me are much better than stock. And vibration is a non-issue. I don't even think of it.

Edited by AlbatrossCafe

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shinyribs

But is it vibes or wrist position causing numbness? The stock bars pinch your wrists in a really odd way and would cause my right hand to begin to go numb after an hour or so. My left hand would last a bit longer. Perhaps since I'm lefthanded and have developed better circulation in that wrist? Either way, proper fitting bars sorted that out. If you think your WR vibes you should ride my XR on the highway lol. Your WR is a Cadillac compared to my old heap. :D

 

Before you dive in heads first spending money on the fork, check your sag measurements. I'm 10lbs heavier than you and my forks are just fne with stock spring and heavier oil. Us heavier guys will always need heavier oil. The rear shock definitely has an obvious lack of rebound control. That can allow the bike to pitch forward under braking, which feels like fork dive, especially when coupled with the stock floppy handlebars mounts. IMO, pop a washer on the risers to solidify the bar mounts, find a bar that fits you well and consider a proper rear shock. 

 

The 07 has sharp brakes. If yours are mushy I'd take a look at servicing them. I was even reading a post on here last night where I guy who races his 07 was bragging on how great the stock brakes are, and I agree with him. 

 

But if the 07 has turned out to be a poor fit for you, and you've already got another bike in your sights, you may be more satisfied going that route. I can say though, as a bigger guy myself ( 6' 2", 33" inseam) that the ergos on the 09 didn't work for me, so be sure to get a proper test ride in before spending more money. JMO

 

p.s.- I'll be in the minority on this, but I think factory recommended tire pressures are way too low. Do your own research on the topic, and stay within the safe pressures allowed by your tires, but proper air pressure made my bike a different machine. Especially considering my weight. 

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DewMan
47 minutes ago, AlbatrossCafe said:

I'm 6'2" and about 250lbs with gear.

 

I got new front suspension with adjustable shocks and much stuffer springs, as well as just a stiffer spring over the OEM rear shock. This basically cured nose dive. I feel I can stop much more quickly now. But yeah, that is gonna cost you over a grand especially if you don't want to do the work yourself.

 

For vibration, either get weighted bar ends or (cheaper and better effect overall) Renthal ultra-low handlebars: https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/renthal-street-handlebars-78

 

I have tried both. The weighted bar ends were fine, but the riding position of the ultra-low handlebars for a taller guy like me are much better than stock. And vibration is a non-issue. I don't even think of it.

What he said.

 

I'm not quite as tall  as he is but at 6ft 250lbs (working to lose some of that for general health reasons), the correct suspension setup for your weight will make a huge difference. 

 

I'm not sure if your normal riding position has you leaning on your hands so you might want to try some combination of setting the bar further back and/or higher. Also the Grip Puppies @Beemer suggested has helped a lot of people.

 

The sliding up on the tank is usually a combination of nose-dive & poor factory seat angle along not gripping the tank tightly with your knees. Perhaps some tank grips would be useful?  When I was using the OEM seat I didn't have the issue of sliding up on the tank but then I don't ride with an overly aggressive style. The Corbin Gunfighter seat I'm using now has a much better rise in the front of the seat, as do all aftermarket options I've seen, to make crushing less likely of an issue.

 

6 hours ago, robbo10 said:

Isn't the bike just not for you? The person to bike weight ratio might seem to be against you. I had a TDM 900 and had to let it go because of my age and my lack of heft. I could see you on that sort of bike. (No offence intended, BTW!)

I humbly disagree with @robbo10's  well intentioned thought. With all of it's low end torque the FZ-07 it's perfect for heavier riders IMO. ✌️

 

Best of luck to you finding a solution to your issues. The price of the FZ-07 left me with the funds to make it the perfect bike for me. This is one of the reasons I chose it.


DewMan
 
Just shut up and ride.

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djfz07

Could also help to adjust your brake and clutch levers at a better angle if you haven't already done so.  I'm 6/2 and the stock lever position made my wrists angle upward.  I adjusted them down so that my wrists are in a straight line to my arms.  Helped a ton.  Maybe try playing with the handlebar position too.  Other than that, they make softer grips that help isolate the vibes better as well.

 

Doing something with the suspension is a must for us heavier guys on this bike IMO.  There's a bunch of good options out there.

 

As mentioned above, tank grips help you hold yourself off the tank during hard stops and will also take pressure off your hands.

 

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norcal616

I have been telling ppl to ditch the front chain sprocket for an plainjane aftermarket one...the stock one make the chain links create a random funky clunky bass like feeling due to that "rubber noise damping thingy" ... switch to an aftermarket one with no rubber noise damping thingy... that will let the chain links roll around the front sprocket much much nicer...

 

Don't know why ppl ignore this... buy hey its only $20 for a front sprocket...

 

 

20170904_054337.jpg

 you can see the front part of the link rides on the rubber ring and the other end barely rides on the rubber ring... the middle of the sprocket shows the front part of link(no chain lube cake gunk in link grove) riding much further into the rubber ring and notice the link ends to the left and right are barely riding on the rubber ring(looks like caked chain lube in link grove)

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2015 fz-07- Hordpower Edition...2015 fj-09- 120whp- Graves Exhaust w/Woolich Race Kit- tuned by 2WDW
 

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Rodney Miller

Lots of great info here guys I appreciate it. 

 

A note about bars is I'm only 5'7 I'm just thick (deadlifting cars does that haha) so I actually have a really upright posture. I will be watching for any funny wrist angles though as that's a good point. I will tinker a bit and check back with ya'll with more thoughts. 

  • Haha 1

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botticelli

I'm 5,11 and 220 naked so 235-240 in gear.

 

I used the stock suspension for about 45-50k on this bike. If I can shred it you can too! I commute over 120 miles a day, and rip the canyons up on the weekends.

 

1. The vibrations I really felt got better when I rigidly mounted my bars(can be done for 5$), sounds weird I know but the bars them selves had a lot less of an ability for movement when high frequency engine and road noise was present. Your dirt bike has squishy tires and is ridden on non-rigid dirt. I'm betting you could loosen your grip some more.

 

2. Hold the tank with your thighs, you don't need to squeeze but just light pressure when breaking. it will prevent the boys from getting impacted during braking. Make a conscious effort to do this for a week and then it will become muscle memory, you wont even think of it.

 

3. Lines help some, but the stock pads are great IMO. Try to really bed them in with some parking lot time.

 

Just my .02 YMMV

~Pete

 

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thedriver1

I had a similar issue with the seat, replaced the seat cover with a more grippy material and it made it a lot easier. 

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rick

I took the OE bar end weights off when I mounted Barkbuster Storms. This really accentuated the vibration that starts right at 5k. I then added Barkbusters extra weights and the bars smoothed way back down. 

 

Maybe adding some bar-end mirrors that clamp to the OE weights can help smooth the bars some. Maybe a thicker glove might help as well. 

 

Before throwing money at the brakes - bleed them. Mine were terrible - the worst I'd experienced in decades - when the bike was brand new. I had an air bubble trapped in that loop of hose that crosses over top of the fender. The brakes improved dramatically after that and I've not had any need to upgrade since. . 

 

you'll need to remove one caliper and hoist it up higher than the other to get any air up there out. 

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gregjet

Ok been through this before but here goes.

Numb arms are not likely to be from vibration on this bike. , ESPECIALLY if you ride  a vibrator and it doesn't cause the problem. Arm numbness is more likely caused from uneven pressure on the palm of your hand/hunching your shoulders, tight arms or ( as in my case) damaged cartilages in you neck.

I have no bars weights and pretty close to no unpleasant vibration. I do have Renthal ultralow bars that have an anti- vibration core.

First check that you are not hunching your shoulders. That will pinch the nerves where they come out of your neck and can cause numbness in your arms. Consciously pull your elbows downwards and relax your trapezius muscles ( google it). If you are a computer gamer it could be caused by mouse arms. You might want to address that as it can cause permanant problems.

Next is the bar angle. Most people do nothing about the bar angle where you grip. If it is at a largish wrong angle  it will cause arm and shoulder problems. If I had video equipment I would make a video as it is easier to show than explain. if the angle is wrong it can cause the following...arm pump, shoulder tightness and accompaning bike handling problems, headaches, arm numbness or tingling, hand numbness or tingling, and can cause PERMANANT damage to nerves and/or blood supply to your hand ( procyclists have the problem a lot).  You tend not to notice on an offroad motorcycle as you move around a lot more and change position.   

  SO:

Getting the correct bar hand angle.

It is easy to see what natural angle your hand wants by gripping the correct size and shaped object you want to use with ONE hand. To this end I have used a set of Renthal ultra lows for the demo.

First I am standing upright with straight arms. This is NOT how you find the correct angle but to demonstrate that body position will change the angle your hand grasps. To find the correct angle you need to be on the bike sitting in the psotiion you will spend the most riding time. However , we continue

I used the lines on the table to help show the angle changes.

The first is the angle of the bars with both hands. Your hands are forced to confrom to the bars angle.

Next I let go of one hand and the bars can now move to the natural angle IN THAT BODY POSITION! As you can see it has considerably more angle than the bar angle. That means that there is uneven pressure on you hand which can press on nerve or blood supply depending on which way the bars now slope. You will notice that the bars are not flat any longer as the hand has a natural vertical angle as well. Everybody's angle will be different. width of bars also changes the angle.

Last one is what happens when you rotate your body and arms down. The angle is now different ( in this case almost right for me). This is why setting you bar angle while sitting on the bike in you riding position is so important, and in my case why these bars are a nice fit.

Getting the right bars, at the right orientation will make a huge difference to bike comfort and control. It also helps show, to some extent, why clip ons slope downwards and dirt bars slope upwards.

 

P4110002.JPG

P4110003.JPG

P4110004.JPG

Edited by gregjet
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Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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angus

Thank you Gregjet, that was a thoughtful and well presented bit of hard earned wisdom that you shared.   The second picture really gave me something to think about.

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