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maz20

Taking off the chain?

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maz20

The FZ-07 service manual suggests it is possible to "take off" the entire chain, and shows a little procedure how to do it. But has anyone done it so far? Is it actually possible? (No chain breaker tools lol)

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cornerslider

Most OEM chains do NOT have a removable master link.

 

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maz20

I know about that, I'm just referring to the service manual's suggested procedure involving pushing the rear axle forward and sliding out one of the swingarm links. Odd procedure : ) but has anyone done it? No breaking the chain!

Edited by maz20

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YZEtc

Yes, I've done it.

I actually go further than just remove only what's needed to remove the drive chain because I remove my chain when the swingarm and shock and shock linkage come out during winter down time maintenance.

I basically remove the rear wheel and the whole rear suspension.

 

If you have the tools and the Service Manual, go for it.

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maz20

Ahh i see, I was wondering if there was anything "extra" that actually needs to be done (e.g., like some extra part taken out) for that procedure but is "hidden" or not mentioned in the service manual. Haven't taken my bike apart anywhere that far yet, compared that winterization! : )

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r1limited

Do yourself a favor, buy yourself a chain breaker from Motion Pro, buy a half dozen master links to keep, and buy a couple of clip master links for your duffel bag or tool pouch.

Far easier then removing half that crap

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rick

Dare we ask why you want to remove the chain?

 

W/o breaking down the chain with a good tool like that Motion Pro r1 mentioned ( and I'm not gonna recommend reusing a chain that's had a link pressed out - unless it's an emergency) and then swaging a new master link back in, I'm thinking the swing arm has to be pulled - not all that hard, but certainly not trivial. Lots of stuff needs to get out of the way.

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gregjet

Been using MATCHED clipped masterlinks put in properly in chains for decades. NOTE: "matched". Chains , even from the same manufacturers, come in varied widths.

I have never had one fail.

On my racing bikes it is one of the first things to do so you can get them on and off easily to change ratios.

The load on the masterlink is the same as it is on an ordinary link , THROUGH the plate. The clip carries no load. In fact, where you can get a thicker plated master link it is stronger . It is also the only link in the cahin you can clean and lube properly.

 

Even on mountain bikes where the chain actually has quite a bit of bend sideways I do the same ( shimano chains come with push pins that I never use).

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digitalsteve

I use master links on my road bicycles.... had no idea they made them for motorbikes; I might have to get one.

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r1limited

In my tool pouch I have a small breaker and spare links (Clip Type) a just in case.  I do not race either bike, so I opt for the rivet.  All of my race bikes like @gregjetsays are clipped, I never spun a chain because of a master link they always snapped at the rivet links ***KNOCK ON WOOD***

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gregjet

R1, pretty much my experience as well. Though nowdays I tend to swap out my road and track bike chains before they get stuffed.

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cornerslider
On 11/25/2017 at 5:15 PM, r1limited said:

Do yourself a favor, buy yourself a chain breaker from Motion Pro, buy a half dozen master links to keep, and buy a couple of clip master links for your duffel bag or tool pouch.

Far easier then removing half that crap

+1 for what r1limited said..... Been there, done that- best choice I ever made.

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maz20
On 11/27/2017 at 11:14 AM, rick said:

Dare we ask why you want to remove the chain?

 

W/o breaking down the chain with a good tool like that Motion Pro r1 mentioned ( and I'm not gonna recommend reusing a chain that's had a link pressed out - unless it's an emergency) and then swaging a new master link back in, I'm thinking the swing arm has to be pulled - not all that hard, but certainly not trivial. Lots of stuff needs to get out of the way.

Mostly just in case I botch the operation of putting on the new chain, or it turns out I need more than the stock number of 108 links on the new/un-stretched chain to fit my custom 15/45 gearing setup (had this setup for a while now). I'm only about 3-4 bars from minimum wheelbase even with my current chain anyway (~19k miles original chain)

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rick

Chains don't stretch, they wear out. New chains should stay stable for a long time. The 525 DID chain on my Aprilia Futura (100+ lbs heavier and and 40% more HP) didn't need its 1st adjustment until nearly 10k miles. 

 

That Motion Pro Jumbo chain tool is worth every penny if yer gonna do your own chains. 

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shinyribs

If you can't spend big money on a Motion Po branded tool, I can highly recommend this exact tool. It's currently $39.99, but Cyclegear almost always runs them on sale right before Christmas for about $25-30. 

 

https://www.cyclegear.com/accessories/stockton-chain-breaker-and-rivet-tool-kit

 

I bought this tool several years ago and took it to a buddy's motorcycle shop to compare it to his Motion Pro tool. All the parts interchanged. His MP breaker had bent a few pins, so he bought one of these for replacement parts after we inspected it, rather than paying MP $$$ for replacement parts. I can't make any claims that they come from the same manufacturer, or that the metallurgy is the same between the two, but it's been a great tool. I have removed and replaced at least 20 drive chains with mine with no issues or signs of giving up any time soon. It may explode tomorrow. It comes with pins and guides to accommodate cam chains, too, which has also worked flawlessly for me. 

 

The key to keeping any chain breaker tool healthy is to grind the riveted heads off th chain link before pressing with the tool. 

 

I also agree that clip-on master links do not give problems. I cannot understand why some people call them weak, and those same people cannot explain why they think that. The only time I don't use a clip-on link is on dirt bikes/dual sports that have offroad-style chain guides. They have a tendency to get chewed up in that situation. I see no problem running a clip-on master link on a FZ 07. $0.02

 

 

XR4 link.jpg

Edited by shinyribs

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rider

I agree with what @r1limited & @shinyribs said about clip masterlinks.  I've used them on dirt bikes and dual sports so I can take them off and soak them.  They go through so much more water and mud and sand than a road bike.  Never had one fail and I magine the stress on an off-road trail is lots more than on the road.

I have the same chain breaker as shinyribs also (or its cousin from another corner of the same factory in China), and it's been great.

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gregjet

"The only time I don't use a clip-on link is on dirt bikes/dual sports that have offroad-style chain guides"

VERY VERY good point shineyribs. I flagellate myself for neglecting to mention this exception and beg forgiveness.

PS It looks like you have the same bikelift as me...

 

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shinyribs
5 hours ago, gregjet said:

I flagellate myself for neglecting to mention this exception and beg forgiveness.

 

 

I'm assuming this was in jest ;D At least I hope!

 

That's a HF lift in that photo. I've nabbed two of those over the years of CL. $150 each. Some of the best money I ever spent.

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gregjet

Video available on request... ( OK maybe not)

 

The problem with the high lifts is that they works so well you tend to leave them there. My GS500 project has sat up on it for the last 18months. My poor 07 languishes unattended in the big shed...

 

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