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AlbatrossCafe

Yamaha OEM Heated Grips Review

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faffi

The aux connector only has a 2A fuse, not enough for the grips.

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shinyribs

This makes me kinda regret my Oxfords. I really wanted these grips because they look so clean on the bike, but I couldn't find any solid info on what temps they could reach. These looks so nice on the bike, though. 

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VertigoTX
37 minutes ago, faffi said:

The aux connector only has a 2A fuse, not enough for the grips.

Thanks for that clarification!  I assume I confused watts and amps, again....    ./sigh

 

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faffi

In my experience, they are better than any aftermarket set I've had. Only tried one set of Oxfords, and they gave comparable heat. But the OEM grips are nicer to look at, comfy and easy to operate, so for me, they are a better product.

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faffi
2 minutes ago, VertigoTX said:

Thanks for that clarification!  I assume I confused watts and amps, again....    ./sigh

 

2A = 28W

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digitalsteve

These look great.... but not for the $306 they're worth here in Australia!!

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cyow5
29 minutes ago, VertigoTX said:

Correct me if I'm wrong, but they only seem to need 22 watts, which falls under 2 amps.

 

https://tinyurl.com/yal8bdau

 

You would only put a 2A fuse on something that draws less than 2A normally, so that makes sense

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Burley

@AlbatrossCafe -- exact same situation for me.  3rd winter with the bike and that's enough.  Ordered them last weekend, expect them in the next few business days.  Just a stone's throw north of you in Victoria BC.  Weather sucks these days with the wind, rain and debris on the road but it is certainly rideable.  

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faffi

I didn't know that they only draw 22w - it surprise me because I wouldn't expect that much heat with such low effect. Also, it is rather surprising that the wiring harness with the appropriate plug that Yamaha sell is (was) for the MT09 and, IIRC, one other model, but not for the MT07. I assumed, wrongly apparently, that it was because of the small fuse on the 07.

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rick

If ya go look to see what aftermarket grips draw, 22w output is quite a bit low. Oxford grips are up around 48w for the pair (needing at least a 5 amp fuse ) and others are nearer to 36-40w..  So, yeah, that's a bit of a surprise. Maybe Yamaha rate limited the draw to match up with the 2A accessory plug circuit - for ease of installation. It'll still be better than stone cold grips and combined with decent guards to take the wind off of knuckles, will definitely increase hand comfort in cold weather.

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AlbatrossCafe

I think I remember seeing that the heated grips themselves have a 15A inline fuse coming off the power that goes to the battery. Not sure why it is so high...

 

Wouldn't hurt to try connecting them in the aux spot though... worse that can happen is that you blow a fuse and your hands are cold.

Edited by AlbatrossCafe

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faffi

Rick, I must say I do find it hard to believe Yamaha can manage to get so much heat with just 22 watt - perhaps it's estimated average drain? OTOH, if they have found a trick to limit power consumption without a drop in perceived heat - well, hat's off to them. I would still expect a peak draw when turning them on to exceed the 2 amp fuse.

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rick
2 hours ago, faffi said:

Rick, I must say I do find it hard to believe Yamaha can manage to get so much heat with just 22 watt - perhaps it's estimated average drain? OTOH, if they have found a trick to limit power consumption without a drop in perceived heat - well, hat's off to them. I would still expect a peak draw when turning them on to exceed the 2 amp fuse.

The controller might be very efficient. I'm guessing the heating wires or maybe an efficient resistor fabirc like what's found in some big dollar vests, is imbedded right in the rubber of the grip? - as opposed to aftermarket grips where the elements are underneath the grips - between the grips and the metal bar. This would allow a far better heat transfer to where it counts - yer hands instead losing heat to the bars. Better looks and more efficient! 

 

That 22w will be continuous. I'm thinking there's no thermostat. My last BMW's grips were either on or not.  Keep in mind that the system will run 14V, not 12. They could almost get away with closer to 26w w/o popping the fuse - assuming charge voltage will drop a bit at idle - especially with the grips on. 

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digitalsteve

There's no way I'd have these wired in on a non-switched connection...

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norcal616

YAMAHA claims they have an auto-shut off feature if battery gets low...

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digitalsteve

Call me untrusting......

 

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Thrasherg

I suspect that by the time the battery voltage has dropped sufficiently for these to detect a low battery, there would not be enough charge left in the battery to start the engine. I would strongly recommend putting them on a switched circuit, i also doubt that they only consume 22watts, that is the same power as a single brake light, there is no way that those 2 grips will consume such a small amount of power and get hot!! If someone has these grips, maybe they could connect an amp meter to the positive feed and tell us how much current they really take on the high setting and then everyone else can make sure they have a sufficient switched supply to run them.

 

Gary

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AlbatrossCafe
18 hours ago, digitalsteve said:

There's no way I'd have these wired in on a non-switched connection...

 

1 hour ago, Thrasherg said:

I suspect that by the time the battery voltage has dropped sufficiently for these to detect a low battery, there would not be enough charge left in the battery to start the engine. I would strongly recommend putting them on a switched circuit, i also doubt that they only consume 22watts, that is the same power as a single brake light, there is no way that those 2 grips will consume such a small amount of power and get hot!! If someone has these grips, maybe they could connect an amp meter to the positive feed and tell us how much current they really take on the high setting and then everyone else can make sure they have a sufficient switched supply to run them.

 

Gary

 

17 hours ago, norcal616 said:

YAMAHA claims they have an auto-shut off feature if battery gets low...

For all you naysayers... in just my week of use I have already observed this feature working its magic on multiple occasions. I have the grips hooked directly up to the battery.

 

Usually at long stop lights, I will turn the bike off rather than idle for 3-4 minutes. This morning I did the same (out of habit) and when I started moving again I felt a lack of heat. The grips had auto-shutoff before the light was green again. My bike was OFF and they correctly detected a drop in voltage.

 

This has even happened once after my bike was warm and I let it idle at a light. Apparently, even low idling can trigger the "low voltage shutoff" if you are doing it for too long (this has only happened once - I don't think you can expect the grips to turn off every time you pull in the clutch). So if the grips detect low voltage with the bike still idling (on rare occasions) you can bet that it will detect low voltage with the bike off consistently.

 

I also left my grips on intentionally after arriving at work this morning. I shut the bike off in the parking lot and watched. Within a minute or two they turned off. 

 

Sure, putting it on switched power would be ideal, but I would say it is far from necessary.

Edited by AlbatrossCafe
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bornagainbiker
2 hours ago, AlbatrossCafe said:

 

 

For all you naysayers... in just my week of use I have already observed this feature working its magic on multiple occasions. I have the grips hooked directly up to the battery.

 

Usually at long stop lights, I will turn the bike off rather than idle for 3-4 minutes. This morning I did the same (out of habit) and when I started moving again I felt a lack of heat. The grips had auto-shutoff before the light was green again. My bike was OFF and they correctly detected a drop in voltage.

 

This has even happened once after my bike was warm and I let it idle at a light. Apparently, even low idling can trigger the "low voltage shutoff" if you are doing it for too long (this has only happened once - I don't think you can expect the grips to turn off every time you pull in the clutch). So if the grips detect low voltage with the bike still idling (on rare occasions) you can bet that it will detect low voltage with the bike off consistently.

 

I also left my grips on intentionally after arriving at work this morning. I shut the bike off in the parking lot and watched. Within a minute or two they turned off. 

 

Sure, putting it on switched power would be ideal, but I would say it is far from necessary.

Very helpful info, thanks--I want these grips even more now. :D

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sniperelite

i have the oxford ones, i don't really care about the square controller. It's actually very easy to use with gloves. they are derectly hooked up to the battery and they auto shut off (even too quick if i'm putting on my gear whilst i let them warm up). Best mod i've done!

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digitalsteve

@AlbatrossCafecall me untrusting, but anything like that would have to be on a switched connection for me. 

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rick
6 hours ago, digitalsteve said:

@AlbatrossCafecall me untrusting, but anything like that would have to be on a switched connection for me. 

That would be easy enough to do - just use the accessory plug to control a relay and then power the grips directly from the battery. 

 

Iirc, my heated vest is 40w and it gets pretty dang hot. The Oxford grips are in that ballpark. Wonder if that Yamaha spec was 22w per side? Maybe the same guy who spec'd the gas tank at 3.7 gallons also wrote the specs for the grips? hmmm. 

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VertigoTX
4 hours ago, rick said:

just use the accessory plug to control a relay and then power the grips directly from the battery. 

@rick, I'm pretty new to all this, and not very mechanically or electrically oriented.  Can you make any recommendations on a "relay" that would allow this type of setup?  Thanks

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rick

Something like this will work https://www.denniskirk.com/rivco/waterproof-30-amp-electric-relay-relay.p215597.prd/215597.sku    30amp will be more than enough to power the grips and you definitely want it water proof. Auto parts store will have as well. 

 

If you use a switched circuit like the accessory plug, turning on the key closes the relay (this requires very little current) and then the heavy contacts inside the relay close, sending power directly from the battery to the grips or a big horn or whatever that will draw a lot of juice. The heaviest duty relay on the bike will be the starter relay under the seat, behind the battery. 

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