Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
wabill

CHAIN LUBE - The best, in my book anyway

Recommended Posts

rowdy
What is a good chain lube that won't throw black crap all over the rear rim and swing arm?
Look at the posts above. Dupont Chain Saver, and wipe it down after (the places that need lubing will still have lube), or just let it dry for the evening.
It won't fling.
 
 
 

Why can't left turners see us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yamahaha
A lot of this stuff is great in dry weather. How is it in wet?
 
I pack a small can of wd40 on long trips. Wd is the only thing I found to keep the chain from rusting in wet riding. Mind you, spraying the chain down a couple times a day is a pain. I would love to find something else more rugged.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
rowdy
I would not use WD40 for an o-ring chain. It has enough solvent in it to do a number on the o-rings and lube underneath them.
I won't even use WD-40 on my bicycle chain, because it won't last through a long ride.
 
  • Like 1

Why can't left turners see us?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bmwpowere36m3
I would not use WD40 for an o-ring chain. It has enough solvent in it to do a number on the o-rings and lube underneath them. I won't even use WD-40 on my bicycle chain, because it won't last through a long ride.

Let me preface by saying, chain lube discussions are like engine oil ones  (rofl)
 
My take/experience… WD-40 is essentially light mineral oil and "spirits".  Yes, WD-40 is a good solvent (I like cleaning rims with it), but if it's getting past the chain's o-rings you've got bigger problems anyway and the chain should be replaced.  With any "o-ring" chain, you're really only cleaning and conditioning the o-rings, which retain the factory applied lubricant inside the bushings/pins.  Coating the "outside" of the chain doesn't do anything for wear and only helps keep down corrosion.
 
Now non-o-ring chains are totally different (like a bicycle chain and I wouldn't use WD-40 either, or at least for long) and in my book a waste of money due to the amount of maintenance they need and their life-span.  Initially they are cheaper, but require MUCH more frequent cleaning and still don't last nearly as long as o-ring chains.  Their only real benefit is weight and friction (less).
 
That said… I've used WD-40, chain waxes, "teflon" chain lubricants and traditional "sticky" lubricants.  As far as chain life, they all faired the same for me.  However in terms of ease of application and cleanliness… WD-40 wins out.  Its "cheap", easy to apply, cleans the chain simultaneously (I also use a grunge brush) and wipes off too a very light coating (no fling and crud'd up sprockets).
 
Sorry, rant off.
 
 
 
 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aeisan
So, pop quiz... Anyone know what the WD in WD-40 stands for? Bonus question for you history buffs.. What's the 40 stand for?
 
Answer: Water Displacement
 
Bonus answer: 40th formula
 
I never use WD-40 as a lubricant, though some do with decent results.  For O-ring chains, it can actually get in there and dissolve the real lubricant.  For non-O-ring chains (like on my bicycles) I use it as a chain cleaner after I wash my bikes and I always make sure to let it sit at least over night to dry before applying lube; it does a great job of - who woulda thunk it? - displacing the water and drying the chain without letting it start to rust.  
 
It's a well known and followed rule in mountain biking that you never use WD-40 as chain lube.  It's just not a good idea and as rowdy stated, it will not last long enough to properly lube the chain for even one ride (for me).  
  • Like 1

Life is good on 2 wheels!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sorkyah
I kinda lucked out i guess, Im not sure what they use, but the dealership I take my bike to for service screwed up one of the rear fender pieces and i kinda milked a years worth of Clean/Lube/Adjust services out of em. After this october(when that year is up) i plan on using that du-pont chain saver, i already have a can of it in the garage from my stepbrother's dirt bike

ATGATT... ATTATT, two acronyms I live by.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
norcal616
Bell Ray or maxima if bell Ray is out at dealership...
  • Like 1

2015 fz-07- Hordpower Edition...2015 fj-09- 120whp- Graves Exhaust w/Woolich Race Kit- tuned by 2WDW
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
thomascrown
I use motul off road. Dont like the road formula.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ornery
I washed the bike a couple days ago, so wanted the chain lubed with something, even if not "the best".  Rode about 15 miles to a Super Walmart, hoping to find oil filters that would work (I have the first 600 mile maintenance due in about 150 miles).  No dice on the filters, but they had tiny aerosol cans of Dupont chain lube w/ Teflon, which said it was OK for O-Ring chain, and only $4.00.   Perfect, it would fit nicely in my pocket, price was right and not a bad product.
 
Ten miles from the store, it was no longer in my pocket!  So, went to my local Walmart for more... none.  Off to Lowes, nope.  Then, to local hardware, zilch.  Finally stopped at Federated Auto Parts, where they had Lucas Chain Lube Aerosol.  "Suitable for use on all chains including O-ring types".  Cost was $7.00, which isn't too bad.
 
[div align=center]zhd-chain-lube.jpg
 
[div align=left]I washed the chain off with a 2" paint brush and kerosene.  Wiped that off, then sprayed the lube on.  It sprays out in a kind of foam.  I'd rather brush it on than have that, but oh well.  Let it soak a bit and wiped off the excess.  It leaves a real silky smooth, but dry surface.  Hopefully, it won't attract dust.
 
I then check my chain slack.  Only 450 miles on the bike, but it was WAY out of spec.  Had to tighten the adjusting nuts at least two full turns each, and that was just to bring it to the 2.20" upper limit.  I'll adjust it again when my paddock stands arrive.  Had to jury-rig a stand for this first lube & adjustment.
[/div][/div]
  • Like 1

“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yamahaha
 

Lucas Chain Lube Aerosol. "Suitable for use on all chains including O-ring types". Cost was $7.00, which isn't too bad.
Let us know how this stuff works out for you especially if you ride over gravel road or in the rain. Goes on dry and feels smooth tells me it won't attract dirt and turn into grinding compound. I think I've seen it locally. Thanks.
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ornery
After a 25 mile ride on dry pavement, it still feels the same.
 
Honestly, I'd rather have something that brushed on. Spraying all over the place seems so wasteful. I'll be keeping an eye out for a liquid version if they make it.

“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
crazycracka501
After a 25 mile ride on dry pavement, it still feels the same.  
Honestly, I'd rather have something that brushed on. Spraying all over the place seems so wasteful. I'll be keeping an eye out for a liquid version if they make it.
That squirrel picture makes me laugh every damn time I see it.  

Make it stop!....Now make it go faster!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
hippiebikerchick
After a 25 mile ride on dry pavement, it still feels the same.  
Honestly, I'd rather have something that brushed on. Spraying all over the place seems so wasteful. I'll be keeping an eye out for a liquid version if they make it.
That squirrel picture makes me laugh every damn time I see it.  
Me too! 
  • Like 1

Illegitimi non carborundum

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ornery
Poor little guy doesn't even know what he's packin', or that he's famous!
 
BTW, that song is a hoot!  :D
 
Bike got rained on today, so I washed it.  The chain had the same grime on it as the wheels.  No more, no less.  Still had a silky smoothness on the surface.  Nevertheless, I washed it again with kerosene on a brush.  Wiped it with terrycloth, then blew it out with compressed air.  Sprayed the Lucus Lube on liberally and brushed it in with a clean, new brush.  Waited 5 minutes and wiped it as completely as possible with a fresh terrycloth rag.  At this point I had a lot of lube on my fingers, so I asked my son to feel the finish on the chain.  He said it felt a little "oily".  A few minutes later I asked if he could still feel the "oil" on his fingers.  He said, no.
 
So, I'll keep on eye on its dust collecting properties.  I will say, no matter how much I wiped it, it will not be completely removed.  Not without a detergent or solvent.
 
 

“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yamahaha
Thanks for the update Ornery. Sounds good so far.
 
I've still got a full can of PJ1 blue label left. PJ is ok except it remains tacky and forces me to clean the chain more often than I would like.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cassecou
Be aware that riding in the rain, or just a simple rain on your bike, is not going to remove any kind of grease out of your chain.
Ask people living in rainy places like, Seattle, London, Paris, Dublin, etc. They don't grease their chain everyday.
Winter where I used to live was, well, rainy. And I drove on and on, without greasing anything on those rainy and dreary days for month. And never had any issues.
Just grease the chain every 500 miles (rain or shine) and you will be just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ornery
Guess I'm good for a few hundred miles now:
 
Edit: Video removed due to safety concerns. While I'm new at riding, as a machinist and carpenter, I've worked with spinning spindles, chucks and other various "dangerous" machinery and power tools my whole life. But, that's obviously not true of most others, so to keep it safe, video is history!
 
Looks like I'll get my wish to have a brush on type lube.  My can fell off the bench and broke the nozzle off!  The lid was on it when it fell, but still managed to break.  Just a stub left of the stem, so I don't think the nozzle will work anymore.  What luck! :|
 

“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
YZEtc
Doing that with the engine turning the rear wheel is not a good idea.
Just a short lapse in concentration, and say goodbye to a finger.
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ornery
You are correct, but if you're proficient using a circular hand saw, chain saw, engine lathe or even a 1/2" drill press (Hell, even a lawn mower!), this would be about on par in the "take care" department.
Just asked the head of our maintenance department, on a scale of 1-10, 10 being most dangerous, how dangerous it is to clean a chain like this? He said 8. I asked how dangerous it was to ride a motorcycle? He said 7-10.

“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yamahaha
Wife and I did about 500 kms today. She had a newly cleaned and lubed chain with Motul factory. Mine cleaned and lubed with PJ1 blue label. Both lubes are tacky to the touch after sitting overnight.
 
End results were:
 
The Motul flung quite a lot. Chain still looked well lubed and it was not real dirty but the rollers were black. Side plates were still white.
The PJ1 did not fling. Chain was black but still looked lubed. This stuff really attracts dirt.
 
Canada tube sells Dupont teflon spray (non stick, dry film formula). Decided to give that a try, after all the original Dupont Multi surface formula is legend. I gave my chain a good cleaning and drying. Sprayed the Dupont on liberally. This stuff drys almost immediately. Non tacky, very smooth, and mostly clear. Wheel spun smoothly with little noise. I've yet to ride the bike but I have high hopes from initial impressions. Will update later on.
 
http://www.performancelubricantsusa.com/product/non-stick-dry-film-lubricant.php
 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aeisan
You are correct, but if you're proficient using a circular hand saw, chain saw, engine lathe or even a 1/2" drill press (Hell, even a lawn mower!), this would be about on par in the "take care" department. Just asked the head of our maintenance department, on a scale of 1-10, 10 being most dangerous, how dangerous it is to clean a chain like this? He said 8. I asked how dangerous it was to ride a motorcycle? He said 7-10.
Quit being lazy and do it the right way.  Spray with the left hand while you spin the wheel with your right hand with the bike in NEUTRAL.  Might only be an 8 on the danger scale, but it's an 11 on the stupid scale.   
Also... If that was your lube that you were brushing on, you should only be putting it on the "inside" of the chain, not on the outside or sides.  Centrifugal force will spread the lube from the inside out to where it needs to be, anything you add to the outside will just spray right off the chain on your first ride.  Get it all on the inside and the wipe down clean the outside and sides as clean as you can.  That will also help the chain stay cleaner by attracting less dirt.  
  • Like 1

Life is good on 2 wheels!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ornery
My biggest concern is keeping the O-rings clean and lubed. The oil has to soak into them. I'm assuming that just takes 5 minutes or so. Everything else on the chain is extraneous, so wiped away. There's nothing slinging off when I'm done.

“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aeisan
My biggest concern is keeping the O-rings clean and lubed. The oil has to soak into them. I'm assuming that just takes 5 minutes or so. Everything else on the chain is extraneous, so wiped away. There's nothing slinging off when I'm done.
Another tip is to lube your chain AFTER a ride rather than before.  The lube soaks in much better when the chain is warm.  Again, don't apply to the outside or sides, as that is just wasted because you're wiping it off anyway.  The lube on the inside will soak outwards once the chain goes in motion due to the centrifugal forces.  Apply to the inside of a nice warm chain and you'll be golden.  
  • Like 1

Life is good on 2 wheels!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
ornery
Just spoke with two riders here about cleaning while it's running. One was horrified. Not about the safety aspect, but concern about the chain carrying the brush or other item into the small sprocket and trashing the case etc.. $$$$$$$
 
He also said the same about putting chain wax on after the bike has been ridden, and chain warm, so it soaks in, then dries on as it cools. Said what flings off is easier to remove from the wheel than chain lube.
 
So, thanks for the help. I'll change up my routine in the future. Whatever it takes to extend the life of these expensive parts!
  • Like 1

“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
aeisan
You're learning. That's what really counts. We've all been there. You gotta start somewhere.
 
I had the same thought about that brush. Eek.
 
Also... I never seem to be able to keep track of the little red tubes that come with the lube, so I never really use them. If you do it by hand like suggested, it's not that hard to get the spray nozzle close enough to the chain that you get the lube on the chain and not much else. I always put a towel down below it so any excess doesn't get on the garage floor and then onto the tire later.

Life is good on 2 wheels!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  


×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.