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cyow5

I will add though - this doesn't mean it can't be operating less than optimally, it just means there is nothing in the posts to indicate that conclusively. A restricted t-stat is a bugger to diagnose, but this one is surely meeting at least the minimum performance it needs and that's all we can conclude from what we know here. 

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rick

I agree with what you guys are saying. And as long as it doesn't overheat in traffic, all should be well.  I'm just basing my speculation on his observation that it's getting hotter faster, than what's been his past experience.

 

Maybe his OE coolant is tired, losing some heat capacity and it's just time for new.

 

 

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pattonme

water is water. the additives are for preventing the formation of ice. Oh sure there might be some small benefit to surface tension and (lack of) surface adhesion with the compounds but nothing that would explain rapid changes in temps. Now that we've apparently ruled water level out, my money is on a questionable temp sensor or more likely something amiss on the water pump impeller that under idle conditions it's not circulating water as fast as it should be vs high(er) RPM.

 

But unless the bike won't cool down I don't think it's worth getting too excited over. My SMR had no fans so during track days I had to putter around the paddock waiting for the session to get underway or the temps would climb VERY rapidly.

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r1limited
8 hours ago, rick said:

I agree with what you guys are saying. And as long as it doesn't overheat in traffic, all should be well.  I'm just basing my speculation on his observation that it's getting hotter faster, than what's been his past experience.

 

Maybe his OE coolant is tired, losing some heat capacity and it's just time for new.

 

 

2 Years is the life span, or less depending on heat / enviroment.  Everything breaks down

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r1limited
1 hour ago, pattonme said:

water is water. the additives are for preventing the formation of ice. Oh sure there might be some small benefit to surface tension and (lack of) surface adhesion with the compounds but nothing that would explain rapid changes in temps. Now that we've apparently ruled water level out, my money is on a questionable temp sensor or more likely something amiss on the water pump impeller that under idle conditions it's not circulating water as fast as it should be vs high(er) RPM.

 

But unless the bike won't cool down I don't think it's worth getting too excited over. My SMR had no fans so during track days I had to putter around the paddock waiting for the session to get underway or the temps would climb VERY rapidly.

No actually correct, most antifreeze also has inhibiters that will stop corrosioon on Alumimun as well as lubercants to keep things flowing, most miz like water wetter states to use Distilled as tap water has hard elemiments that is distructive to aluminum.  Water in itself will reach a boiling point much fatser as well as steam away faster without an additive like water wetter as the example.  Its never a good thing to use tap water or distilled straight.

I am sure you know that just wanted to clairify

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rick

Yep, coolants are only 50% water. The other half is mostly glycol based along with some lubricants and chemicals to maintain pH -  critical to keep an aluminum system from electrolytically eating itself to death. The mixture has a much higher boiling temp than straight water and has a much higher heat capacity.

 

Wouldn't hurt to pull the connector off the back of the sensor and give those prongs a spritz of contact cleaner - after finding this stuff, I'll never use dielectric grease again  https://www.amazon.com/Hosa-D5S-6-DeoxIT-Contact-Cleaner/dp/B00006LVEU/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1512563015&sr=8-1&keywords=deoxit+d5

 

the connector is at the back of the motor and is pretty easy to reach

 

 

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pattonme

by 'water is water' I should have said 'coolant is coolant'. There isn't a worthwhile difference between them where it concerns the movement of heat from one place to another. Just need to find an in-line flow-meter to rule out the impeller. *grin*

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rick

The gear that drives the oil pump/water pump assembly in my Rotax is made of nylon or some kind of plastic. There have been some tooth failures ( and it's like going to the dentist to pay to have it fixed) 

 

Sure hope we don't see failures due to design engineers saving an ounce or just cutting down on a little gear noise by using plastic bits instead of steel or even alloy.

 

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shinyribs

Stop and go traffic can cause some crazy looking fluctuations on temperature readouts in colder weather. The temps have a harder time normalizing when the outside air temp is low. You can have situations where the thermostat senses to open itself, then the radiator releases a "super cooled" dose of coolant in to the engine, causing the thermostat to shut it self again- then you may see the temps spike up briefly since the cooling system never got to flow normally and cool the engine correctly. 

 

Some engines have a small thermostat bypass circuit to help reduce this effect, since there is always at least a small amount of constantly flowing coolant in the system. I don't know what the FZ has, but if there is no bypass circuit, weird temp swings in colder temps is not unusual....just very alarming if you catch it when it's being wonky. 

 

I'm not sure how to explain this well. If it's not making sense, google "KLR 650 T-bob". Those guys can explain it much better. 

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FZ07R WaNaB
19 hours ago, shinyribs said:

Stop and go traffic can cause some crazy looking fluctuations on temperature readouts in colder weather. The temps have a harder time normalizing when the outside air temp is low. You can have situations where the thermostat senses to open itself, then the radiator releases a "super cooled" dose of coolant in to the engine, causing the thermostat to shut it self again- then you may see the temps spike up briefly since the cooling system never got to flow normally and cool the engine correctly. 

 

Well, I finally got out on my bike again - first time since my post. Today it was 50 degrees out, and I had a wide variety of riding situations which included 70mph highway and total stop-and-go in rush hour.

 

Shinyribs may have something with the last post. It stayed at 176-178 at highway speed., but it was going all over the place when stopped. It would jump 10 degrees in the matter of 20 seconds. It was definitely erratic to say the least fluctuating both up and down. Once again, it would climb quickly at a complete stop. I rode last winter but I didn't keep an eye of the temp as much as I do now, so it may have been spastic then and I didn't catch it. As all the fluids actually appear good, I decided to try another test and repeatedly let it get hot enough to kick in the fan when stopped, and then stayed stop. It consistently brought it down to around 185 shortly after the fan started.

 

I'm not sure what to think other than I will keep an eye on it, and if anything gets too over the top, I'll take it to my mechanic.

 

 

 

 

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r1limited

I thin I know what the problem is

 

I am too lazy to read all three pages got to ask

  1. How many miles on the bike?
  2. How old is the bike?
  3. when was the last time you changed coolant?
  4. is the Over flow tank filling up or have fluid in it?
  5. Are the fans coming on?

 

In all honesty it sounds like you need to flush your fluids, put fresh in and make sure you BURP that system.  It sounds like and feels like you got a bubble in da system and it needs to burp

Edited by r1limited

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norcal616

It's a super sensitive sensor... I don't pay attention to coolant temp till it keeps climbing past 220°F when im actually riding along at 55 mph type of deal... that is when I start thinking something may be wrong such as a leak, actual physical impact to rad surface, is the exhaust putting out colored smoked?... 

 

Stop and go traffic will cause more extreme temp bounces due to airflow

 

Wanna talk about extreme coolant temps? Come on down to my work and check these massive locomotive exhaust coolers out 😂 or the full sized pickup truck bed sized turbo intercoolers 😁

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rick

Mine fluctuates over a 4F range while I ride - up and down and up and down all the time. My Aprilia never does this.  it bothered me for a while when I 1st got the bike. I now just ignore it as, erm, normal

 

But if it's holding temp while you ride and the fan will quickly bring the temp back down, your rides will be more enjoyable if you tab thru the menu on the clocks to the trip meter. 

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r1limited

Does this thread seem hot :)

  • Haha 1

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