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dmoney

Helmet lifecycle

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dmoney
I've had a look through the forum and cant find what I'm after. Does anyome kniw hiw strict the helmet replacement thing is? In my case, i have an arai corsair v that has a manufacture date of 01/10 but i bought it in 12/12 when i wore it for 2 months and then stopped riding for a few years due to a cycling crash. I started using it again around 07/15. I know it says to replace after 5 years of use but is that continuous or is it a bit looser in this case? Arai also says to replace it within 7 years of manufacture date. How much does the helmet deteriorate over time?
 
The reason im asking is do i need a new helmet yet? And if i do, would a closeout one thats a few years old be ok?
 
Thanks in advance

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hobbs
The suggested cycle is, as far as I know, a 2 pronged thought process.
 
The first part being that to benefit from technological and material advances, you need something current. Overall, not that big a deal in my mind since helmets are indeed advancing, but not as rapid as say, electronics. It's still expanded polystyrene styrofoam with improved shapes and typically polycarbonate shells.
 
Part B being that UV rays from the sun, gasoline vapors, chemical irritants and repeated shock degrade the integrity of the structure over time.
 
If the helmet was kept away from those negative elements, I would consider it perfectly fine for a couple more years. Altought no longer cutting edge, the difference in performance is likely relatively minimal.
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dmoney
Thanks hobbs. The helmet was stored for those 2 and a bit years in a wardrobe so no UV exposure there. I guess what i wanted to know is if an old corsair v that was technically not under warranty would be better than a brand new helmet that costs $100

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faffi
I wouldn't worry. A long time ago. MOTORRAD together with ADAC tested an 11 year old Jebs helmet that had been used every day in all kinds of weather during that period. It had been treated that way most do, but shouldn't, like hanging it over the mirror etc. The old helmet still passed the (very strict) current EEC test.
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Beemer
Next thing ya know they'll be telling us to buy a new home every 20 years.
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dmoney
Oh Beemer, you must've not heard. Its every 15, the walls lose their structural integrity and it becomes a safety hazard for all the wiring..... ?
 
In all seriousness, thanks for the replies guys. I treat my helmets pretty well, never put them om floors, hang them off mirrors and stuff like that. Thanks again guys, much appreciated.
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Mr.Puss
I like hot dogs.
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Beemer
I like hot dogs.
I tried a bacon wrapped hot dog with bar-b-que sauce once and it was King Dog! 
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Mr.Puss
I like hot dogs.
I tried a bacon wrapped hot dog with bar-b-que sauce once and it was King Dog!
Never tried that it does sound divine. 

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johnakay
here in the UK it is recommended to change every 5 years.

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dmoney
here in the UK it is recommended to change every 5 years.
 
 
Its the same here in Australia. But ive seen people with newer helmets than mine that have obviously been treated poorly. Mine looks pretty much like its fresh off the shelf. Regular cleaning and all ?

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Beemer
I tried a bacon wrapped hot dog with bar-b-que sauce once and it was King Dog!
Never tried that it does sound divine.
Ooooh, it issss! You'll be smackin' your lips instead of the cat. 
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CarGuy7a
Mostly the reason they say to replace every so many years is the foam can break down overtime like others have said from the environment, sweat etc. Some of it also comes from the racing scene where Snell ratings play a big factor. Snell ratings are much more strict than DOT ratings (which is why a Snell rated helmet cost so much more than a DOT) and alot of tracks check and require you to use a helmet with current snell ratings. Yes there is a big difference between a Snell and DOT helmet I've owned both. A Snell helmet is more solid and robust feeling whereas a DOT (to me) just feels cheap. With that being said my Icon Variant is DOT rated only but it actually feels pretty robust IMO for a DOT helmet. Also a good rule of thumb is if the helmet has ever been significantly impacted IE a crash impact...replace it which is why you want to take good care of them avoiding dropping or in the event of a road rage incident throw your helmet at someone haha. Whether or not you buy a snell or DOT rated helmet and replace it between 5 and 10 years is purely up to you but I would say in that time frame it may be a good idea to at least start thinking about it depending on the frequency of use. As for racing, I've raced go carts for many years and they required us to use Snell helmets and every 5 years a new Snell rating is released so we were required to buy a new snell rated helmet for racing in that time frame or we couldn't race. But we got our money's worth out of the helmets using them pretty much every weekend in the summer months so they were subject to alot of sweat and abuse.
 
Here's a good read on Snell vs DOT rating. Pay close attention to the last paragraph. http://smf.org/docs/articles/dot
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faffi
I think Snell changed their certifications during the past decade. Previously, Snell made sure helmets could not absorb as much impact as a helmet approved by EEC because Snell demanded the helmet should tolerate to whacks in the same place. That meant you could not crush the helmet interior in the first prang, making the impact harder for the rider. And since you nearly never hit hard in the exact same spot twice, this is redundant - what you want is to soften the initial blow as much as possible.
 
A magazine tested Snell approved helmets against cheap DOT approved plastic helmets, and the latter typically offered better absorption of hits for two reasons; they could crush all their interior immediately and the plastic deformed, helping spread the load. Snell demand great protection against penetration, again something that rarely happen in the real life; you are more likely to hit a big surface that a really sharp object.
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r1limited
Look as long as you:
[ul type=disc][*]DO NOT Use a Petrolium cleaner or polisher on it
[*]DO NOT Expose it to the Elemints without cleaning
[*]Change the Liners, chins and straps each year or two
[*]Did not drop it crash in it or get a good impact to it[/ul]
That helmet depending on the make up of composites will lst 6 - 10 years.  OEMS will tell you every 4-5 years, F THAT if you are racing them race track officials will check the date of Manufacture and look for DOT and Snell dat stamp it will be up tothe race and track promoters to set thier standard and say her a 2006 DOT and SNell stamp is too old.  All that date stamp means is it passed the test standards of that year PERIOD.  The OEM manufacture date does not mean a expiration date clock.
 
Keep the helmet cleaned with proper non petroleum or alcohol products will safe guard that the composites and glues will not decompose.  The only thing I will add is thisGot a $100 noodle, buy a $100 lid.  Ya do not have to go buy them fangdangled $700 lids wait until bike bandits sells em for like 50% that  Nothing wrong with a 1 year or two year old lid.  My Arai Corser is coming up to 10 years old, I wil lpick up a new Helmet this coming next season
 
 
 
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