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mjdavis1994

Any tips for frame swap

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mjdavis1994
So I've been a mechanic for 5-6 years now but never worked on bikes till my FZ. Everything is straight forward so far for any upgrades I've done. However unfortunately my subframe is bent slightly at the right rear peg and by the looks of it where the swing arm is connected is slightly tweaked. I've ordered a new frame/rims and am ordering a load of upgrades (integrated tail, rear sets, flush turn signal for the front, CRG Arrow bar end mirrors, crash cage and sub cage, and a few other goodies). So to my question, for the engine swap, is there any tips I should be aware about while pulling the engine? I know on the cager side of mechanics some engines are tricky or there are tricks to make things go so much easier. It'll be 2-3 months before I do this work being that I'm deployed but I'm trying to get all my ducks in a row first. I know there's a specialty tool for removing the lower triple tree mount and everything else looks pretty straight forward. Any tips to make things go smooth?
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jbone
I don't know the answer to your question, but how did you get the damage? I don't see anything that points to a crash?

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mossrider
There realy is no secret.
 
Lotsa patience, a good radio station and allow for double the time you think it should take. Then just be methodical and try to move assemblies from the bike to the frame directly, building the bIke as you go. Avoid completely stripping the old one down to a pile of nuts and bolts  before begining rebuild. I've had mine apart several times to the frame and had the motor out three or four times. I use good notes, digital pics on my phone/Ipad, different sized zip lock bags and small boxes for sub assemblies or related parts groups. I still fark up tho so allow extra time for re-dos ?. 
 
Oh, and a case of beer helps, to pay assistants after job is done.

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mjdavis1994
I don't know the answer to your question, but how did you get the damage? I don't see anything that points to a crash?
 
 
Put a throttle assist on after my 34 hour trip to TN and went out for a test run to see if I wanted it for the ride back. Went over the crest of a hill and it locked onto my shortie levers and I landed on my back going about 55. Cracked both rims, both rear pegs, both front pegs, handlebar, exhaust was crushed and subframe bent, and cracked the housing for water pump. Moral of the story, if you use a throttle assist don't point it directly down when you first take off. When you give it throttle it will lock onto the levers if they're adjusted in.
 
On a brighter note, a lot of the stuff I'm replacing was planned anyways. With the exception of the frame, rims, and exhaust. But yoshi is dropping the price for me to 300. So that helps. Overall cost is around 1300 for all parts.

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mjdavis1994
There realy is no secret. 
Lotsa patience, a good radio station and allow for double the time you think it should take. Then just be methodical and try to move assemblies from the bike to the frame directly, building the bIke as you go. Avoid completely stripping the old one down to a pile of nuts and bolts  before begining rebuild. I've had mine apart several times to the frame and had the motor out three or four times. I use good notes, digital pics on my phone/Ipad, different sized zip lock bags and small boxes for sub assemblies or related parts groups. I still fark up tho so allow extra time for re-dos ?. 
 
Oh, and a case of beer helps, to pay assistants after job is done.
 
 
Yeah when I swap motors out on cars or do any big job I use a couple magnetic trays and as the bolts come out they go in the tray in that order. I'm hoping to be able to swap everything in a day. It's doable just gotta be careful not to fudge anything up in the process. Nothing ever goes as planned though. Thanks for taking the time to reply much appreciated.

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ducttapewd40
Not motorcycle specific, but I will mark each electrical connector with masking tape and corresponding numbers. Before I disconnect one I'll just put a peice of tape with a 1 written on it on each side of the plug, then a 2 on the next and so on. Takes a lot of thinking and tracing wires out of reassembly to just find a connector labeled 14 and plug it into the other one labeled 14.

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markstertt
All very good tips, being a retired aircraft mechanic, I had to keep track of hundreds of screws and such on inspections so would use old muffin/cupcake pans sourced from the local thrift store, usually around $.50 each. If need be, I would mark individual cups with tape or felt marker, I'd label pans for left and right sides to keep hardware for each wing or component separated. I now use my old pans for the bikes.
 
 

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