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philsyd

[Noob Question] Smooth Power Wheelies

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philsyd
Hi guys,
 
This might be a bit difficult to consult via text, but i'm giving it a shot hoping that there's an expert out there who can help me :-)
 
I think a big part of the fun of MT 07 is the ability to do power wheelies (I just prefer them to clutch ups). Really started to get into that recently.
 
At this stage, I taught myself how to get the front wheel up to a satisfyingly high level. However, this is about the only thing I'm happy with and need help regarding everything else.
 
So what I basically do is get in second gear, get to about 6k rpm, quickly close the then fully open the throttle which causes the front to lift quickly. Now my problem is that as that happens and I reach a "scarily" high level, I just release the throttle which causes the front to drop a bit hard, which is far from ideal.
 
What I would love to do is be able to still lift the front quite high but bring it back down smoother as to minimize the stress to the forks as well as eventually learn to keep riding on the wheelie for a few meters.
 
From what I could gather watching some videos, I think I should experiment with the following: as I open the throttle to lift the front up, instead of closing it once I get 'scarily high' try to quickly close and immediately slightly reopen and play with repeating that movement.
 
However, that's just my theory. Curious to hear from experts! If you got any video footage that would demonstrate what I should do that would be truly awesome!
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Cruizin
Not the answer you are hoping for, but wheelies just happen over time. Alot of times, people who try wheelies on purpose often end up wrecking their bikes and sliding down the road on their butts.
 
I learned how to wheelie as a kid, on a dirtbike. The best way to learn because dirtbikes are tough and built to wreck.
 
$8,000 bikes on the street arent built to be wrecked.
 
With that said, go find a lonely barely used road and just launch hard. Do some cruise in 4th gear, downshift fast into third and rip the throttle fast. You don't have to pull up, it just occurs.
 
I hate giving wheelie advice. Its just not a useful skill on a streetbike. It serves no purpose whatsoever. I ride with alot of track guys, we ride 35 mph corners at 90 mph fully leaned, rubbing knees and hardly anyone can keep up with us in the mountains. And honestly, I have never seen any of those guys wheelie. To us, it's more about maximum traction on two wheels at very very high speeds.
 
We do, however, enjoy going out at night and watching kids wreck their bikes trying to wheelie.
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mossrider
Hypothetically speaking, if I was to give wheelie advice which I would never do mind you, I would say to blend the rear brake and throttle as the bike comes to the balance point near the top of the wheelie.  
 
Instead of chopping the throttle as the bike comes up, feather the throttle, while simultaneously gently applying the rear brake, if needed as the bike rotates up underneath your right toe. This will keep the engine in the power band while giving you some control of the bike to prevent over rotating. You can then feather the throttle hopefully using wind resistance, power and weight transfer to control the height of the wheelie but giving you the option of using the rear brake as a safety.
 
With a little practice it worked for my dumb ass.
 
Done correctly it feels like the bike rotates up into a cushion as it approaches the top. You have to understand that without some brake or throttle or combination of each you are ballistic and basically out of control.
 
Just sayin.
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Beemer
I do the same thing in 2nd gear if I want to pull an occasional wheelie but I don't try to ride mine out like some people do. I did that sh*t when I was younger and more stupid with money. To prevent the front from slamming down just throttle it some (blip, blip, blip) after you initially let off the throttle to ease it down slowly and do the same if you want to hold it up longer. With practice you will find the sweet spot in the throttle to just hold it there and smoothly ride one out. I don't recommend doing them either, they're just for show and no one is going to be so impressed with your wheelies that they offer to help you pay for damages if you drop it. Just food for thought, do as you wish.
 
One last thing, keep your foot ready on the back brake in case it does start to come over backwards on you and just tap it, not too hard. I forget the newest dumb name for that. Stay frosty!
 
 
[video src=https://youtu.be/LW_xqcNmslg]
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ducttapewd40
I tried to figure it out on my dirt bike the other day since I've never been able to do decent ones on purpose. The best spot I have to practice is a horse riding/ roping corral on my property, but the ground is mostly sand. I mostly just spun the back tire in 1st gear but managed to pull it up a little in 2nd. The best result I got was when the neighbor drove his side by side over and I abandoned the wheelie practice for drag racing him back and forth. I actually got a few good ones in when I was just trying to get a good launch and beat him across the corral.

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gregjet
As mossrider says, wheelies are about balancing the engine with the back brake. DON'T tap it , evenly apply it against the engine. I don't purposly wheelie ( I spent too much time trying to get front traction) but all the articles on it say engine smooth and work against the back brake.
Having said that the 07's crappy throttle/fuelling will make it less successful than it should be unless you have it refuelled.
Gearing down also helps if it is you true hearts desire.
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Cruizin
Over on the FZ-10 forum the topic is how to reduce wheelies. That damn bike just wants to take off like a rocket towards the moon.
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r1limited
In order to do smooth power wheelies, you have to change to a Smooth Bpowerband.  Many use the Kawi 650 powrband from Yosh, but some swear by the old CB450 powrband for HRD.  Power bands are not hard to change out if you have the right tools.
 
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Beemer
As mossrider says, wheelies are about balancing the engine with the back brake. DON'T tap it , evenly apply it against the engine. I don't purposly wheelie ( I spent too much time trying to get front traction) but all the articles on it say engine smooth and work against the back brake. Having said that the 07's crappy throttle/fuelling will make it less successful than it should be unless you have it refuelled.
Gearing down also helps if it is you true hearts desire.
He's only at the stage of just trying to bring it up to the right point without it flipping backwards and also not slam the front end down. Tapping it lightly is just a noob measure to prevent it from going backwards on him. Better than wrecking. Using the brake control to 'ride a wheelie out' is more advanced. He's not there yet (wants to be eventually) or at least that's how I see it according to what he described. 
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gregjet
Beemer, better to try and learn the right way from the start than to have to unlearn ingrained habits , I reckon.
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philsyd
Thanks for all the great answers, guys.

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Beemer
Beemer, better to try and learn the right way from the start than to have to unlearn ingrained habits , I reckon.
The right way? We are talking about a person that is very close to flipping his bike over when he pulls the front end up and being that he's a noob that hasn't mastered the fine art of wheeling like a pro just yet the best thing he can hope for to prevent a crash is to tap the brake quickly before it flips over.  
Don't worry, slamming the front end down some isn't going to hurt anything, that's what shocks are for and it's part of the learning process. (won't affect his ability to learn controlled braking for controlled wheelies when he's gained some experience) Get on your bike and try doing some wheelies and I guarantee the front coming down harshly and if you yank it up too far and fast past the balance point you'll be tapping that back brake real quick. It's going to be more of an emergency type braking than a controlled one because you'll feel panicked suddenly. You'll see and then you'll believe.
 

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ducttapewd40
I did finally get some decent ones in the other day and was happy enough to be able to keep the wheel a half a foot off the ground for a few seconds. Nowhere near needing to think about balancing the brake yet.
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crsnhppr
Be careful , between 5 and 7k rpm your getting into dangerous torque levels in 1st gear if you don't have much exp. start working right now on your 2nd gear clutch ups. Roll about 25-30 mph then pull clutch in till you lose friction at the same time your doing that roll on throttle about 1/4 a revolution to build rpms (it's gonna be about a 1/2 second of movement and motion very quick ) then release clutch. The front end will creep up slowly and maybe a foot or two off the ground if at all. Squeeze with your thighs against the bike, chop the throttle as soon as the wheel lightens or gets airborne with your foot covering the rear brake. Then get use to that feeling and slowly work on that snap motion and feeling.
 
 
I have my clutch pretty far out in the adjustment so take up is very quick . I give throttle WHEN I am pulling in the clutch to pop it. That way I don't over rev the bike to a point when it's gonna be too high in the Rpms for it to be violent. I release the clutch when I know where it's smoothest for my bike and weight . It will likelyy be different for you and it's only something you can gradually feel out as to how long you let the Rpms build while the clutch is being disengaged. It's. A very quick motion. The sound the bike will make should be a slight drop in rpm that lasts a fraction of a second then a quick spike then another drop off ass the clutch re engages. The reason for the initial quick drop is because in my case I'm bringing throttle in before the clutch completely disengages and I'm releasing during the rpm climbing when it reengages. It's very quick
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Beemer
I did finally get some decent ones in the other day and was happy enough to be able to keep the wheel a half a foot off the ground for a few seconds. Nowhere near needing to think about balancing the brake yet.
Thank you! Just like how the guy in the video explains, a little more each time until you get to that point, way up high, where you do use brake and throttle combo to ride one at a constant speed.  

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