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level41

Easiest (cheapest) way to increase tank capacity?

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Cruizin
RC cars don't weigh 400 plus pounds. I'd stick with soft bladder or MSR cans on a motorcycle. They are rated for fuel for a reason, heavy object crashes. In a skid under weight, asphalt could grind that plastic and cause you to burn.

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rhb
RC cars don't weigh 400 plus pounds. I'd stick with soft bladder or MSR cans on a motorcycle. They are rated for fuel for a reason, heavy object crashes. In a skid under weight, asphalt could grind that plastic and cause you to burn.
Just to clarfy, I''m not talking R/C cars, I'm talking about 50-100 pound aircraft with 200cc engines going 80-100 MPH, do the math. The tanks we used were often 64 oz. Personally I wouldn't carry any auxiliary gas on a motorcycle, it just does not make any sense for any good reason, just pointing out options for those looking for alternatives in that vein. Oh and if you install such a thing where it could scrape pavement, I believe that would qualify someone for the Darwin award. :)
 
102_9970.jpg
 

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martyinaustin
I wonder if the bikes frame will hold liquid, safely, without leaking???  ::)
haha...Buell style, right?  love that. 
 
 

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Beemer
I wonder if the bikes frame will hold liquid, safely, without leaking???  ::)
haha...Buell style, right?  love that. 
 

Yup, and it keeps the weight low. I've always liked what they did. 

Beemer

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Beemer
RC cars don't weigh 400 plus pounds. I'd stick with soft bladder or MSR cans on a motorcycle. They are rated for fuel for a reason, heavy object crashes. In a skid under weight, asphalt could grind that plastic and cause you to burn.
Just to clarfy, I''m not talking R/C cars, I'm talking about 50-100 pound aircraft with 200cc engines going 80-100 MPH, do the math. The tanks we used were often 64 oz. Personally I wouldn't carry any auxiliary gas on a motorcycle, it just does not make any sense for any good reason, just pointing out options for those looking for alternatives in that vein. Oh and if you install such a thing where it could scrape pavement, I believe that would qualify someone for the Darwin award. :)
 
102_9970.jpg

I wouldn't let my kid ride inside an RC plane like that. What kind of parent are you?!  ;) Seriously though, that's a real nice plane there, great hobby! Is that you, yours? I want one!! 

Beemer

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pineappleunderthesea
Interesting! Though too bad, the smaller ones can be crushed and leak so easily.

Not true for the ones I sourced, they would sustain a crash in an R/C plane and not rupture, very important to prevent fire. basically crash proof. 
 
2007.jpg
 
free upload no registration

I would be careful saying Nalgene bottles are fuel proof:  it depends on the plastic they are made of.  Some can be HDPE, for example, while others which are clear are made of Tritan material (which is a modified polyester) which will eventually craze, crack, and fail.  The pic you show seems to be the ones made from HDPE or something similar (the Tritan is typically clear).  
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rhb
Just to clarfy, I''m not talking R/C cars, I'm talking about 50-100 pound aircraft with 200cc engines going 80-100 MPH, do the math. The tanks we used were often 64 oz. Personally I wouldn't carry any auxiliary gas on a motorcycle, it just does not make any sense for any good reason, just pointing out options for those looking for alternatives in that vein. Oh and if you install such a thing where it could scrape pavement, I believe that would qualify someone for the Darwin award. :)
 
102_9970.jpg

I wouldn't let my kid ride inside an RC plane like that. What kind of parent are you?!  ;) Seriously though, that's a real nice plane there, great hobby! Is that you, yours? I want one!!
Sorry about the highjack ,,, but he asked. 
That is a picture of a plane identical to mine, I have a picture of the one I owned but no person to get the sense of size, this one since it is a bipe, has only a 100"wingspan at 46% scale, just under 50 pounds, 2 cylinder 150cc engine running av gas and synthetic oil, 18 HP, running a 32"prop. monoplanes at this scale have about 140" spans. BTW, it cost the same as an FZ-07, about 8,500 to build with a competition engine & premium parts including Titanium control rods :)
 
My version
ulti2600.jpg
 
 
The engine, about 2 grand.
3_W_157_Xi_B2_CS_02.jpg
 
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rhb
Not true for the ones I sourced, they would sustain a crash in an R/C plane and not rupture, very important to prevent fire. basically crash proof. 
 
2007.jpg
 
free upload no registration

I would be careful saying Nalgene bottles are fuel proof:  it depends on the plastic they are made of.  Some can be HDPE, for example, while others which are clear are made of Tritan material (which is a modified polyester) which will eventually craze, crack, and fail.  The pic you show seems to be the ones made from HDPE or something similar (the Tritan is typically clear).  
Originally when I was buying these, all Nalgene bottles were HDPE not the LDPE bicycle bottles that they also make now.  thanks for the update. 

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msesma
Facer tank is bigger. I think it must be easy to adapt, but platics won't fit...
 
Anothe rsolution is cutting the filling tube to allow one liter or so more

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faffi
Or just drill a hole at the top of the filler.

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gregjet
Tracer tank should be perfect. Fuel pump will supply correct pressure or probably the std 07 pump will bolt straight in. I couldn't care less about the tank plastics and if necessary happily make some glass or carbon covers to replace anyway.
If you run solo only ( I do), you could easily make a well protected tank to fit into the rear seat area and even use the top as a carrier. On my Husky I have aux tanks and transfer fuel with a car fuel pump into the main tank.

Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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rhb
Tracer tank should be perfect. Fuel pump will supply correct pressure or probably the std 07 pump will bolt straight in. I couldn't care less about the tank plastics and if necessary happily make some glass or carbon covers to replace anyway. If you run solo only ( I do), you could easily make a well protected tank to fit into the rear seat area and even use the top as a carrier. On my Husky I have aux tanks and transfer fuel with a car fuel pump into the main tank.
But you live in Australia where Mad Max came from, it's understood you don't have many Petrol stations outback and need to come up with outlandish solutions :) like carrying people here in the Philippines. 
 
 
habal_habal3.jpg
 

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ducttapewd40
I found that if you just drive it until it dies, someone will eventually stop with a gas can for you while you're walking it down the interstate in the hot assed July sun. Boom, extra gallon tank.
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fzob1
If you run solo only ( I do), you could easily make a well protected tank to fit into the rear seat area and even use the top as a carrier. On my Husky I have aux tanks and transfer fuel with a car fuel pump into the main tank.
This ^^ I would love to see this done on a FZ07.  Only change I wish would be gravity feed to keep it simple.
 

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rhb
Here is something that popped on my FB feed. SW-Motech about 80 bucks (in Philippines) with hardware for mounting.
 
gas_canister.jpg
 
 
 

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Beemer
Tracer tank should be perfect. Fuel pump will supply correct pressure or probably the std 07 pump will bolt straight in. I couldn't care less about the tank plastics and if necessary happily make some glass or carbon covers to replace anyway. If you run solo only ( I do), you could easily make a well protected tank to fit into the rear seat area and even use the top as a carrier. On my Husky I have aux tanks and transfer fuel with a car fuel pump into the main tank.
But you live in Australia where Mad Max came from, it's understood you don't have many Petrol stations outback and need to come up with outlandish solutions :) like carrying people here in the Philippines. 
 
 
habal_habal3.jpg

HAAAA!! I can't stop myself from envisioning everyone putting their feet to the ground (if they can reach it) for extra stopping power, like in the Flintstones. Good leather bottomed sandals don't get the attention they deserve. 

Beemer

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pegasus46
Here are the parts for the tank. I cannot see any fuel level sender, which correspond with my previous suspicion that the "reserve" is calculated, not factual.  
http://www.partzilla.com/parts/search/Yamaha/Motorcycle/2015/FZ07+-+FZ07FCGY/FUEL+TANK/parts.html
I am not sure what you mean by calculated. The only kind that is not calculated is a sight glass. I would imagine that it uses a pressure sensor. These take up less room and are more accurate than a float system.
 
 

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msesma
The fuel sender is in the same ass'y than the pump:s-l225.jpg
 
 

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faffi
Thank you.
 
By calculated I mean that it doesn't say it is at reserve when there is a certain amount left, but when the bike think you have a certain amount of miles left to go. I could be wrong. It could be that it is very difficult to fill the bike up to the same level every time and that there can be a litre or more in difference between fill-ups despite the level appearing to be the same. I have experience everything from 9 to 11 litre fitting into the tank when it goes on reserve.

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rhb
Thank you. 
By calculated I mean that it doesn't say it is at reserve when there is a certain amount left, but when the bike think you have a certain amount of miles left to go. I could be wrong. It could be that it is very difficult to fill the bike up to the same level every time and that there can be a litre or more in difference between fill-ups despite the level appearing to be the same. I have experience everything from 9 to 11 litre fitting into the tank when it goes on reserve.
the manual is a wonderful document, it clearly states you have .7 of a gallon left after the Trip "f"starts. it shouldn't matter how much gas you put in or have, it is reserve meaning what's left after reaching a certain level. So how far can you go on 3/4 of a gallon? 25 or 30 miles driving conservatively. 

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level41
Yeah, the fuel meter itself isn't correct.
Sometimes I come home having like 3 bars or so, but when I start it up again cold the next day, it's 2 bars. Then it jumps back to 3 after warming up.
Sometimes it shows different bars on the sidestand peg compared to riding upright (or park uphill vs downhill). Not sure where the fuel sensor is located.
 
Building a tank in the passenger compartment would be cool, however, it would probably load just 0.5 GAL max. THere's not a lot of space there, plus, I always put my papers, and an extra set of goggles there.
Forget about the rear suspension adjustment tools, they're pretty much worthless lowering the suspension, I can't see myself using them successfully to increase it.

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faffi
Thank you for clarifying that, but that will also mean I must take much more time making sure the fuel tank really is full. .7 gallon = 2.7 litre, which means I should be able to get 11.3 litres into the tank. Every time. Something I have not been able to, although I was close once.
 
Ridden gently, I can get 50 miles from reserve, then. The time it started missing for about 5 miles prior to me having a chance to fill up, I managed to get 12.9 litres into the tank when fuel was sitting above the filler neck. However, the distance I managed on reserve match fairly well with the .7 gal listed in the manual.
 
Anyway, from now on I will consider a limit of 40 miles from the point where the E is flashing, which is a worst case scenario for me.

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faffi
Yeah, the fuel meter itself isn't correct. Sometimes I come home having like 3 bars or so, but when I start it up again cold the next day, it's 2 bars. Then it jumps back to 3 after warming up.
Sometimes it shows different bars on the sidestand peg compared to riding upright (or park uphill vs downhill). Not sure where the fuel sensor is located.
 
Building a tank in the passenger compartment would be cool, however, it would probably load just 0.5 GAL max. THere's not a lot of space there, plus, I always put my papers, and an extra set of goggles there.
Forget about the rear suspension adjustment tools, they're pretty much worthless lowering the suspension, I can't see myself using them successfully to increase it.
You could build a tank on top of the pillion seat pad, removing the foam first. I think a gallon should be possible.

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ralph
Most I ever got in mine was 13.44 ltr it did not stop but was missing on acceleration.
 
From full
6 blocks full miles
5 70
4 100
3 130
2 160
1 184
Flash 213
Missing 268
 
I got 268 miles on a tank
but that was out with slower bikes and
dont think we got above 50 mph it would
likely do better now as it has about 12000
miles on the clock.
Been very happy to see a fuel station on 
a few occasions used to have a Suzy Vstrom
that had a near 20 ltr tank it was great but
you felt the weight when you filled the tank.
 
 
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faffi
Thanks for giving us more date, Ralph! IIRC, I got flash at around 170 miles / 290 km on my best run, the one I basically ran dry at 227 / 365 km. I managed to get 12.9 litres in for a comsumption of 3.53 litre per 100 km, which correspond well with the computer saying 3.5. That equals 66.5 mpgUS. Your consumption was only 3.12 litre per 100 km!

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