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Sweeps

Missing second gear consistently

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Sweeps

Been happening increasingly the past month. About every 40 shifts up I am not getting into second gear no matter my speed. Is it me or the bike? Been riding a good amount of time and don't think it's me being lazy on up shifts. So what's the remedy please?

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ddog

If it's not happening all the time, it's probably you.
 
You may want to try adjusting your shift lever down to make sure you're getting your toe high enough when you're upshifting.

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cmill189

How is your chain slack? When my bike was new the chain stretched like crazy over the first 1,000 miles. Every time I thought I couldn't shift at all it turned out to be way out of adjustment.

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ralph

Make sure you are letting the lever return to it.s rest position
and you are not letting your boot rest on it between changes also
that the linkage and lever are free to move.

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mecmar44

When you say missing, do you end up in 3rd or do you feel like your up-shift didn't shift into 2nd? I've noticed that depending on what shoes/boots I'm wearing has an effect on my shift habits. As Ralph mentioned make sure you are letting the lever return to its rest position. I noticed on the ride into work this morning wearing my riding boots that I had to be intentional about letting the lever return. Another thing I've tried was after the lever has returned to its rest position, apply light pressure prior to pulling in the clutch lever.

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elmo

Sweeps,
I agree with previous post.
My issue was randomly not getting to 3rd gear, and discovered my foot was not allowing shifter to completely return back to rest position. My solution was to raise the shifter 5mm.
 
 

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Sweeps

I have zero issues 3-4-5-6. It's always 1-2. So not thinking the shifter is too low. I adjusted the cable but still happening. I am at 4000 km. The chain is good. Really not enjoying this.

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rick

Hate to say this, but if it's just that gear change, you might have some wear or damage to the shift drum or the dogs that engage on those gears. There's no easy fix - the motor gets pulled and the cases split. You might be able to get to the shift fork w/o pulling the motor, but if the drum dog for that shift is worn, well, it's still some work to replace.
 
How many miles? What kind of oil are you using and how long ago was it last changed. If yer still running dino oil or worse, oil meant to be in a car and not a gearbox, switch to at least a semi-synth motorcycle specific oil. Not likely it'll change yer life, but, it's easy enough to do and might help.
 
Only other thing I can add to the good advice above, check the shift linkage for lube/smoothness and/or slop from wear.

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USMCFieldMP

Can you make it to second if you're just sitting still? Are you taking care to ensure you're pulling the shift lever all the way up?
 
Every now and again, I'll have a day when I'll hit neutral about 5 times when trying to go to 2nd. It's always a case of me trying to quick shift and not actually pulling the lever all the way up with my foot.
 
Outside of that, if you are ensuring your pulling the lever all the way up... and it's still not making it into second, you very likely have an internal problem.
 

How is your chain slack? When my bike was new the chain stretched like crazy over the first 1,000 miles. Every time I thought I couldn't shift at all it turned out to be way out of adjustment.
 
I don't think chain slack should affect your shifting. That's just not how things work mechanically. I've had a loose chain before... no affect on shifting.

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Sweeps

I have 4000 km did the factory service and had factory oil installed at 1500 km. Yes I can run the gears at a stand still without the engine running without difficulty

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USMCFieldMP

I didn't mean without the engine running... I meant with the engine running. If you're just sitting there, can you pop 1 to 2 without issue? If you can do it sitting still without issue, then it is most likely an issue with YOU if you can't do it properly when moving.

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norcal616

another idea, you can easily pull away at a stoplight in 2nd gear.. i hate 1st gear on this bike, its the same as 2nd gear to me...2nd gear is about 5mph faster at my shift point compared to 1st gear...
 
 
extreme option is to convert to GP style shifting...


2015 fz-07- Hordpower Edition...2015 fj-09- 120whp- Graves Exhaust w/Woolich Race Kit- tuned by 2WDW
 

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rick
I have 4000 km did the factory service and had factory oil installed at 1500 km. Yes I can run the gears at a stand still without the engine running without difficulty
Trying to get my head around why it would shift OK w/o the motor running 
Seems to me that if it shifts fine w/o the motor running, that says the drum and shift fork are probably OK. So it's gotta be something else.
 
Have you checked the clutch freeplay and adjusted it to spec. If there's too much freeplay, you might not be opening the clutch pack quite enough. W/neutral in between, 1st to 2nd is the longest shift of the bunch - and usually the easiest to miss anyway. I still do it on occasion if I don't get my big ol boot under the lever fully. But that's not the bike's fault, that would be me being lazy.
 
If it's still under warranty, ask the dealer to ride it - or find someone you trust to ride it.  If it's mis-shifting on them as well, something is wrong and it'll likely be a manufacturing issue. Hard to imagine those bits worn out so soon.
 
Personally, I'd dump the Yamalube stuff and switch to at least a semi-synthetic oil. Everything will work better. Might not help, but won't hurt.
 
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r1limited

^^ Accept the switch to semi.
 
As many mentioned Ergo, Ergo Ergo, It can be anything from where the foot is placed under the lever, to clutch play. I have found the gear box a tad clunky compared to what I am used to. IMO only if you have a rear stand and a spare body around to assist (Not Required), set the bike up on the stand both feet on the pegs and note where your foot (Shift Side) or feet for that matter rest on the pegs when you are in riding position. Are you struggling to get your boot under the lever, will the boot hit the side of the lever? It is easy to adjust the shift linkage to get your boot to feel comfortable. Many riders do not attend to the ergonomics of their riding style to fit comfortable on the bike. Same as the rear brake, adjust it to be where you want it to be when in a riding position. Each location should take minimal effort to engage.

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“Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.” --Thomas Jefferson quoting Cesare Beccaria

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Sweeps

My riding ergonomics are really good. One of the reasons I like the bike is it fits my preferred riding position. My foot isn't prematurely lifting or not fully disengaging the lever on shifts. Maybe I am shifting too low on the rpm around town? I will switch to new synthetic oil asap.

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ralph

With the first to second change you have to go through neutral
could you be feeling that and not completing the change?
only other thing get someone else to ride it see if they get the same.

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faffi

My son hangs up between 1st and 2nd on his CB400SF all the time when under full acceleration. I find it to be a superb shifter, never hit a false neutral. Not sure what we do different. I used to own a GSX600F that I never managed to shift 1st-2nd if revs were above 8000, but my brother had no issues with it. My conclusion; it's about ergonomics and shifter/clutch/throttle coordination. The Honda somehow doesn't fit the kid, that Suzuki didn't fit me. Some bikes are more sensitive than others. I have no issues with my FZ-07, but the box definitely works best with very quick shifts for me.

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ralph

I have to agree on the quick shifts.

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rick

W/o synchronizers, all of these boxes shift better when it's done with some crispness. Some boxes respond well to a wee bit of pressure on the pedal, right before pulling the clutch. Do that on my Aprilia and it's gonna shift before yer ready. But my old R bikes needed such behavior as those boxes were a tad clunky. I find the FZ is somewhere between those 2 extremes.
 
Usually, shift quality will improve with the miles. .

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cmill189

How is your chain slack? When my bike was new the chain stretched like crazy over the first 1,000 miles. Every time I thought I couldn't shift at all it turned out to be way out of adjustment.
I don't think chain slack should affect your shifting. That's just not how things work mechanically. I've had a loose chain before... no affect on shifting.
How is that not how things work mechanically? The chain and the trans sprocket are directly connected...mechanically. Go tighten your chain too much, you're going to have a hard time shifting. When it's too loose it's flopping around when you're off throttle. 

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r1limited

Riding in today I paid particular attention to shifting. I found 1 missed shift from 1 - 2 and the root cause was my lackadaisical approach to shifting caused the problem. The FZ has a need to be intentional when foot applies pressure to change a gear especially between 1st and 2nd, this is true for "ANY" motorcycle between 1 and second as normally neutral is between the two. So based on the four steps of Scientific method and thus formulating my hypothesis and analyzing the results through observation and confirming the existence of the phenomenon. Since I have proven the hypothesis the theory I have produces is simple:
 
The subject has either not gained muscle memory to justify the linkage between brain, foot, shifter or The subject looses concentration based on a percentage and environment exemplifying the attribute of missed shift which really boils down to a variation of 1: a short between the seat and handle bars or 2: lose of cognitive reaction due to a hottie that just walked across the street aka loss of concentration

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“Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.” --Thomas Jefferson quoting Cesare Beccaria

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USMCFieldMP

I don't think chain slack should affect your shifting. That's just not how things work mechanically. I've had a loose chain before... no affect on shifting.
 
How is that not how things work mechanically? The chain and the trans sprocket are directly connected...mechanically. Go tighten your chain too much, you're going to have a hard time shifting. When it's too loose it's flopping around when you're off throttle. 
 
If your chain is too loose, it won't affect your ability to shift - that's what I was addressing. But to address what you just said, if you're chain is tight enough to the point where it's moving your transmission hardware enough to affect your shifting, you have larger problems. I've heard more than my share of people say that shifting trouble can be attributed to chain slack... but that's just not the case.
 
Your shifter should not be affected by the amount of slack in your chain. That's just not how a sequential transmission operates.

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rick

A tight chain will do no good to the output shaft bearing, sprockets or chain, but that bearing holds the shaft still regardless how tight the chain. Besides, when you are hard on the gas, the top run of the chain is gonna be really tight. Even still, you should be able to shift at redline - even w/o the clutch
 
this is a nice vid to show how this works

 
here's another look  
 
the gear shifting really is isolated from the chain. 
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Sweeps

My chain tension is spot on. I did switch oil last night to Shell Rotella triple T 15w40 the diesel rated stuff with wet clutch approval and the shifts have been a lot smoother all day.

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rick

Cool. You and your gear box will be happier for it.
 
 

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