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blackout

Maybe another FZ07R this winter....

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blackout
With only one trackday under my belt, I think I'm hooked.  This winter I hope to build an FZ07R using my current street FZ-07. My current bike already has most all the suspension goodies, so it's really only the R bodywork that will be added and maybe a little motor work.  I hope to attend more track days this year and next year to learn how to ride better and then eventually get my race license.  Not really sure how that works? Might be a stupid question, but how good do you have to be to race? In other words, how do you know when you are ready?   Anyhow, it's clear that the FZ-07 will benefit in the aerodynamic department on the long straights with the R bodywork, so that's the main reason for the upgrade.  My head faring helped a ton, but I know it's adding turbulence at higher that highway speeds.  Listed below are the current upgrades on my bike. 
 
K-Tech fork cartridges
Nitron R3 shock
Custom rear suspension link
Ohlins custom front mounted steering damper
Woodcraft rear sets
Woodcraft sliders all around
Tyga custom exhaust
FTecu bike side Data-Link
Drag handle bars
Bridgestone S21 tires
 
Oh yah, with this my street bike, I will want to add lights to keep the bike street legal.  Maybe something I can easily remove when I go to the track. 
 
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axemanblue
Might be a stupid question, but how good do you have to be to race? In other words, how do you know when you are ready?     
Not a stupid question at all, but maybe I'm biased because I asked it too. ;-) 
I have similar racing plans (track days are awesome, aren't they?) and my gauge is a simple one.  At the tracks I go to the club racers are the ones in the A group. When I'm fast enough to mix it up with them is when I plan to get my race license--because they're they people I'll be racing against.
 
I didn't see what area you live in, but I've found it really helpful to start doing track days at tracks that I eventually plan to race at. I've come across more than one club racer there doing testing or prep, and they've been happy to share their experiences and insight. 
 
Someone has a FZ07 race build thread that details all the steps he took to modifying his bike. I'll see if I can find it and I'll post it here if I do. 
 
Congrats on getting bit by track bug. Now be prepared to break out your wallet...
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blackout
Might be a stupid question, but how good do you have to be to race? In other words, how do you know when you are ready?     
Not a stupid question at all, but maybe I'm biased because I asked it too. ;-) 
I have similar racing plans (track days are awesome, aren't they?) and my gauge is a simple one.  At the tracks I go to the club racers are the ones in the A group. When I'm fast enough to mix it up with them is when I plan to get my race license--because they're they people I'll be racing against.
 
I didn't see what area you live in, but I've found it really helpful to start doing track days at tracks that I eventually plan to race at. I've come across more than one club racer there doing testing or prep, and they've been happy to share their experiences and insight. 
 
Someone has a FZ07 race build thread that details all the steps he took to modifying his bike. I'll see if I can find it and I'll post it here if I do. 
 
Congrats on getting bit by track bug. Now be prepared to break out your wallet...
Good  info, thanks. 
I live in Canandaigua, NY.  The closest track is NYST, but they only have races for 300cc bikes for zoning or maybe insurance reasons.  Not sure....  They only have been open since 2013.
 
 

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axemanblue
I'm not familiar with the club racing circuit on your side of the country. Hopefully someone else can chime in about that.
 
This is the race build I mentioned, for your reference. This guy was going for a dedicated race bike, so some mods would be different for you if you want to keep it street legal.
 
http://www.mnsportbikeriders.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=77573&st=0
 
We should have one of these here at FZ07.org (hint hint)

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mossrider
Both you guys need to put away your manginas and try racing. You don't need to be fast to do it. There are many 'average folks' racing at tracks all over the world.  No matter how many bikes on grid there is still only one winner, the rest of us suck. Once you feel comfortable in close proximity to other riders/bikes while passing or being passed you are ready. When you catch yourself trying to catch or pass faster riders during a track day as opposed to enjoying yourself by yourself, you are ready. No one starts out as a 'fast guy'. The main difference between enjoying a track day vs racing is simply your level of agression. Even at the highest levels of racing, see MotoGP, if you look closely there is a diverse level of skill and equipment. Most of the guys on that grid have no real hope of winning though it doesn't prevent them from gridding up! Same thing at all levels of racing, new folks coming up, mature folks winding down, fast guys grinding the rest up. 
 
Rock it!
 
Almost all tracks or race clubs have a licensing program, ask around they'd love to help you get started. It usualy takes a full day of on track and classroom training that ends in a test race for licensure. Licensing isnt so much about being fast as it is about being safe and predictable so everyone can work on becoming fast in relative safety. I guarantee you'll never regret it.
 
That link above is me/my bike by the way. I started racing w/o ever doing a single track day. I enjoy both now for their own merits. Ask the fastest guy at any track and they'll tell you the same thing, "without slower guys to pass it's not called racing it's called riding". Get passed enough and you'll wick it up. 
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mossrider
To take this a step further; 
   Some Clubs don't require lights be removed but merely taped or otherwise prevented from creating shrapnel in a crash.  Unclipped, unhooked, covered, removed etc. Kickstand generally must be removed, not difficult.  License plate and rear light pod can easily be removed trackside for racing, again required for safety. 
 
You could easily french a headlight into the race fairings OR race it half faired by just adding a fluid containing belly pan to your current set up. At the speeds these bikes are capable of (130-140ish) the aero package isn't that critical. Full fairings are unnecessary and prolly only give you a mile an hour or so in reality. I routinely get beat by several nekid bikes.
 
Numbers can be affixed in any manner of clever ways or plastic plates zip tied onto bodywork temporarily.
 
He's right tho, get out your wallet. Everyones budget is diffferent but somehow I always seem to go over mine, by a mile, if my wife reads this "its not my fault,"
 
tablet_143.jpg
A cheap alternative to full fairings...
 
 
I blame Beemer ?
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axemanblue
Bahahaha, some excellent points, man-gina notwithstanding!
 
My competition-minded ego doesn't want to admit it, but you're right about just jumping in after a certain point. More than one fast guy has told me he became so by chasing other faster guys. It's my pride wants to insists that I'm at least competitive when I get there, as I've been lapped once on track and that absolutely sucked. (And I knew the f*cker, which made it worse.)
 
But hey, even if Tito Rabat doesn't score another point this season, he's still a former champion who's living the dream and could probably beat all of us on a stock 300 with one eye closed. Cause what I'm ultimately hearing you say is that it's all about getting out there and having fun.
 
Thanks for the kick in the ass and the inside view. And yeah, nice bodywork! :D

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faffi
If you want to go fast to feed your ego, you will probably end up slow, yet dangerous. If, OTOH, you want to become a better rider and enjoy yourself, speed will come naturally together with your increase in skills. It's about mindset ;)

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stickshift
Go naked! (with bellypan).
 
Check out Rafael Paschoalin's naked FZ, he finished second in middleweight bike at this year's Pikes Peak hillclimb.
 
Naked7.png
 
 
Naked7a.png
 
Seth Starnes was 4th in middlweight, also on a naked FZ (90 hp).
 
 
 
 
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rhb
If you want to go fast to feed your ego, you will probably end up slow, yet dangerous. If, OTOH, you want to become a better rider and enjoy yourself, speed will come naturally together with your increase in skills. It's about mindset ;)
The other side of that is ride within your limits, (first knowing them), then push them little by little, getting comfortable, but not complacent at every increased speed. Know your bike and respect it's ability to throw you off if you screw up.
 
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faffi
Good points - I should have mentioned the benefits of attending a proper riding school like Freddie Spencer or CSS etc.

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blackout
Go naked! (with bellypan). 
Check out Rafael Paschoalin's naked FZ, he finished second in middleweight bike at this year's Pikes Peak hillclimb.
 
hyyTpagy1EUastyle=max-width:100%https://preview.ibb.co/cVgEUa/Naked7a.png"]

Thanks for sharing!  Love the piggyback shock and custom airbox to make it fit!   

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blackout
Racing naked sounds cool, but I will most likely order the R bodywork this October once the school taxes get paid. :)

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stickshift
Another pic of Paschaolin's naked race bike.
 
A surprising amount of standard plastic parts still on it!
 
 
 
Paschoalin13.jpg
 
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rhb
Another pic of Paschaolin's naked race bike. 
A surprising amount of standard plastic parts still on it!
 
 
 
 

An interesting application of what is important and what is not, aftermarket pipe, but stock headers, stock clutch lever, but looks like radial front brake lever and braided lines. plastic is irrelevant, no radiator guard, maximum air flow. stickers make it go faster. 

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