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level41

Maintenance intervals?

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level41
What are some common maintenance intervals that are often overlooked?
 
I'm not talking about putting fuel in the tank, or changing the oil every 4k miles, or checking the tire pressure...
 
But things that may be less obvious for the riders that ride their bikes normally (not hooligan their bikes).
 
 
Like,
 
[ul type=disc][ol type=decimal][*]Do the forks need maintenance at some point? (like at 25k miles, 50k miles, 75k miles?) If yes, what usually needs to be done to them? Change seal, change oil?
[*]How long do crankcase seals usually last (provided you do oil changes at regular intervals)?[*]How long do the stock tires usually last? (10k miles?)[*]Valve adjustment interval is at 16k miles, but some people said theirs didn't need any adjusting until 50k miles?[*]Do the wheel bearings need grease?[*]How long on average does your battery last? (Mine has been changed after 2 years to a Li-Ion battery).[*]How long can you ride on the chain (with proper maintenance).[*]How long does the stock counter sprocket last?[*]In normal, city/sburban riding, how long until the air filter needs to be changed?[*]O2 sensor?[*]Anything else I should be aware of?[/ol][/ul]
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faffi
1. Fork oil should be replaced every 6k miles. Seals when they leak.
2. Usually forever.
3. Depend upon road surface, tyre model, tyre pressure and riding style. Anything from 1k to 25k miles possible.
4. 24k miles as per Yamaha, but if they need adjustment they usually require that sooner. Once they've settled, they are likely to stay in spec for 100k miles or more. You will know something is amiss if you year louder and louder ticking noises from the top end, or if idle becomes erratic.
5. No, they should be sealed for life, which can be anything from 0 to 300k miles.
6. From months to a decade. Use and climate and charging all affect life. I would expect 3-4 years on average.
7. Up to 50k miles, but typically 20k. Once it has come to its end of adjustment and/or needs frequent adjustment and/or has kinks in it and/or it has stretched unevenly the chain is toast.
8. Until it is worn out. Always replace chain and sprockets as sets.
9. Use the manual as a guide.
10. Will likely never fail.
11. Swingarm should be stripped down including linkages every year or two of you ride often in the wet. Steering stem bearing should be lubed and checked every second year. Brake fluid changed every 2 years. Brake calipers should be stripped and cleaned every 2 years if you ride a lot in the wet, every 5 years or so if you ride in the dry only.
 
 
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jbone
A lot of that stuff can be answered just by observations and reviewing the user manual .
 
1. I wouldn't mess with these unless you see fork oil leaking or notice performance issues. Manual says to check for operation and leakage every 4k miles and replace as needed.
2. I wouldn't bother with crankcase gaskets (or any for that matter) unless you see leaks or have to tap into the systems for other repairs.
3. Tires should last anywhere from 5k to 10k miles. This totally depends on your riding style, road conditions, age , etc. Good stands will greatly extend tires during prolonged storage. If you run in potholes frequently, you'll be replacing tires rapidly.
4. Valve adjustment is 26,600 miles. Most people don't bother unless there are performance issues.
5. I think these wheel bearings are sealed and don't need greasing until they go out and need replacement. Not 100% tho.
6. A well maintained battery should last 4 years or so. Get yourself a cheap meter and test its output if you're curious.
7. A well maintained chain could last you well into 20k miles. Manual says to clean / lube every 500 miles. I'm in humid conditions so I do mine every 300-400 miles. Check your o-rings and look for obvious wear. If you see slop in between links, replace. 
8. Sprockets should last you about as long as your chain at least. Google image worn sprockets and take note. They shouldn't have sharp pointy teeth.
9. Air filter change is about 24k miles in normal riding conditions per manual. Check it every 4-6k miles if you want peace of mind.
10. 02 sensor won't show you many problems until it's on its way out. You may notice check engine light, rough performance, gas mileage issues. Monitor as you go but most likely won't see any issues. 
 
11... Review the manual for coolant and brake fluid change intervals, clutch and chain adjustments, steering bearing greasing (12k miles), spark plug replacement, fuel sync every 4k miles per manual.
 
As you can see, a lot this isn't so much "you must replace at 'x' amount of miles" , but inspect and replace as needed. Obviously fluid and chain maintenance should be followed as closely as possible.
 

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faffi
jbone, have you ever smelled old, worn fork oil? Nasty! And full of metal. There is a reason why it should be replaced - both due to viscosity breakdown and to get rid of wear particals that act like a grinding paste on the internals. After just 4500 miles, the oil in my fork was already pretty contaminated.
 
Otherwise I agree in that most things can be left alone until they show signs of giving trouble. Good you picked up the coolant issue also.

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r1limited
 
 
[ul type=disc][*] Do the forks need maintenance at some point? (like at 25k miles, 50k miles, 75k miles?) If yes, what usually needs to be done to them? Change seal, change oil?
Yes, dependng on how aggressive you ride every season to everyother, that oil gets beat up pretty quick.  Change seals when leaking or 4 years IMO
[*]How long do crankcase seals usually last (provided you do oil changes at regular intervals)?
I have seen seals last forever, however if you pulling the cases apart replace the seals
[*] How long do the stock tires usually last? (10k miles?)
Varies per rider, for me one season, if Q3 well I can go through 2 a season 10k no
[*] Valve adjustment interval is at 16k miles, but some people said theirs didn't need any adjusting until 50k miles?
Depends how it is ridden and maintained, I have close to 45k on the R1 as this coming winter new shim and buckets will be done (Valves) 40 k is the suggested. 
[*] Do the wheel bearings need grease?
These are normally sealed, FZ is sealed, but greasing the internal area and packing some grease between seal and bearing is a good practice including a little grease on the axle while installing
[*] How long on average does your battery last? (Mine has been changed after 2 years to a Li-Ion battery).
The Yuasa stock went dead in 2 years (R1) I replaced it with a Bike Master TruGel 5 years ago.  It died just the other day.  On average change the battery every 4 - 5 years.  Always keep a trickle on it.
[*] How long can you ride on the chain (with proper maintenance).
This again depends on how you ride and maintain the chain.  The type of chain wax used has a lot to do with it, I use amsoil HD best stuff I have ever used all the rest just allows for road shit to be glued to the chain.  Inspect every ride for kinks or loose links.  Replace at 10k or sooner
[*] How long does the stock counter sprocket last?
See Above, a good clean and maintained chain will preserve sprokets.
[*] In normal, city/sburban riding, how long until the air filter needs to be changed?
Not often actually, I use K&N it can be cleaned maintained air filters are expensive, OEM is a toss in the garbage, K&N can be used up to 50k they claim, well claim.  I clean my Filter twice a year.
[*] O2 sensor?
When it goes out or the Errro code pops up
[*] Anything else I should be aware of?
Always wear a rubber, check for an adams apple.  All I could think of
[/ul]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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level41
Change fork oil at 6k miles?
I have bikes with almost 50k miles on, that never had this job done!
Mostly used on asphalt roads, not offroad, or tracks.
 
Same with my brake fluid, I hardly ever brake hard; ride very gentle.
I have bikes of 2013 that still run on their factory brake fluid.
And it still looks tea-color, with no signs of brake fluid loss, leaks, or sponginess.
 
 
I do live in a hot environment, so I understand why my battery and tires last less long.
I got like 15k miles out of one set of tires, and went through the rubber on the rear tire.
Front tire had no thread in the center, but was still rideable.
 
Personally I have only once changed an air filter, of a 10yr old bike; but the filter still looked ok (just decolored).
I guess it really has to do with the environment. Just a small dust road on a daily commute may make a big impact on filter replacement, compared to riding in clean air, with asphalt roads.
 

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faffi
I don't know about you, but for the me the brakes are the most important items on any vehicle. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, meaning it absorb water. The water will cause internal corrosion and will lower the boiling point. So if you go charging down a winding road, braking hard for every hairpin, you risk having no brakes whatsoever when you need them the most.
 
 
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r1limited
Change fork oil at 6k miles? I have bikes with almost 50k miles on, that never had this job done!
Mostly used on asphalt roads, not offroad, or tracks.
 
Same with my brake fluid, I hardly ever brake hard; ride very gentle.
I have bikes of 2013 that still run on their factory brake fluid.
And it still looks tea-color, with no signs of brake fluid loss, leaks, or sponginess.
 
 
I do live in a hot environment, so I understand why my battery and tires last less long.
I got like 15k miles out of one set of tires, and went through the rubber on the rear tire.
Front tire had no thread in the center, but was still rideable.
 
Personally I have only once changed an air filter, of a 10yr old bike; but the filter still looked ok (just decolored).
I guess it really has to do with the environment. Just a small dust road on a daily commute may make a big impact on filter replacement, compared to riding in clean air, with asphalt roads.

I am sorry, I cannot let this one go "BAD BAD BAD ADVISE" This is what not to do. 
 
 

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ralph
When I worked for a dealer one of our biggest businesses was sorting out the
the mess after those that could not leave well alone, finger trouble payed well,
There were also the others that only ever came in when it stopped, between the two
extremes are the happy bikes and owners.
 

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tlstaj
I don't know about you, but for the me the brakes are the most important items on any vehicle. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, meaning it absorb water. The water will cause internal corrosion and will lower the boiling point. So if you go charging down a winding road, braking hard for every hairpin, you risk having no brakes whatsoever when you need them the most.  

Plus brake fluid is cheap, very cheap. The process of bleeding brakelines is simple and easy aswell. There isn't an excuse for neglecting brake fluid
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r1limited
I don't know about you, but for the me the brakes are the most important items on any vehicle. Brake fluid is hygroscopic, meaning it absorb water. The water will cause internal corrosion and will lower the boiling point. So if you go charging down a winding road, braking hard for every hairpin, you risk having no brakes whatsoever when you need them the most.  

Plus brake fluid is cheap, very cheap. The process of bleeding brakelines is simple and easy aswell. There isn't an excuse for neglecting brake fluid
Brakes are sooooo over rated, I mean they just slow you down. 
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level41
Brakes will work, even if you don't do the meticulous biweekly bleeding, like some recommend...
 
A friend of mine had a 10 year old scooter that finally gave up the ghost. Never ever had an oil change done! Believe it or not!
It was a smoking puffing blue cloud farting thing. She said when the bike would overheat, she just added oil. Never even knew how much to add. Just 'a bit'.
Still, she had the scoot for 10 years (it ran with kickstart, no battery), as a testimony to Honda.
Scoot needed seals replaced, a piston job, filter changes, and exhaust cleaning, as the entire rusty muffler was full of black gunk. The engine could barely breathe! ???

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faffi
And the moral of that story is? Ignore the bike and let it perform poorly until it dies a decade down the road? I don't get it. There is of course a difference between being anal and totally ignorant, but replacing fluids and lubing moving parts every now and then will ensure better performance, less trouble and more miles until dead. For someone so occupied by economy, that should be logical.
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r1limited
Brakes will work, even if you don't do the meticulous biweekly bleeding, like some recommend... 
A friend of mine had a 10 year old scooter that finally gave up the ghost. Never ever had an oil change done! Believe it or not!
It was a smoking puffing blue cloud farting thing. She said when the bike would overheat, she just added oil. Never even knew how much to add. Just 'a bit'.
Still, she had the scoot for 10 years (it ran with kickstart, no battery), as a testimony to Honda.
Scoot needed seals replaced, a piston job, filter changes, and exhaust cleaning, as the entire rusty muffler was full of black gunk. The engine could barely breathe! ???
Sometimes I read things so profound, so absolutely altruistic it defies rational logic.  I just wanted to point that out. 

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level41
Yeah, point is, that sometimes in the long run, it pays off doing less maintenance.
Not to mention, every time you take apart the bike, and put it together again, there's a chance on a loose bolt (with the risk of losing parts along the way), one that breaks off, new thread tapping, or parts that end up damaged.
The fact that a scoot ran 10 years without ever having the oil changed, is a miracle. It probably burned the bad oil.
This, just to say that if we miss the 6 monthly interval, we'll still be fine.
I've worked with Volkswagen beetles, many came in, that didn't have had an oil change done in years, and had a milky substance. Smelled horrible.
They still ran many more years.
 
I do believe in doing maintenance, but fork oil? Every 6 months? really?
What manual does that come from?
If I do it every 4-5 years, it will be a lot!
Only do it when the ride becomes too spongy.
On the streets I really don't need a stiff suspension anyway.

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