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xcsp

Fuel requirements? Valve Check/Adjustment Intervals?

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xcsp
I do not recall it being discussed yet but is there a specific fuel requirement for the FZ07 and what is the valve check/adjustment mileage interval ?   Just curious.

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Guest ybcheese
From what I have seen valve adjustment intervals are every 40,000 kms that would be about every 25000 miles ( disclaimer check with your dealer). I hear that you are to run 87. I wonder if it will be OK to use better stuff. In pa our 87 is sucks during the summer. Believe it or not we have summer and winter blends. Not a lot of people know about it; but its true, you can tell the summer blend burns like shit. I noticed a big difference with my old 81 flh shovel head.

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xcsp
Thanks. I asked the sales guys at the shop and they seemed cluelesss on the maintenance schedule. Fuel-shouldn't be a problem to run better grade fuel, but sometimes you may be in an area where the only choice is to run the low grade.

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Cruizin
I'm told that Yamaha recommends 87 octane, which surprises me. Also, first service is at 600 miles, oil change and as important, Throttle body sync.
 

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Guru
A valve check is required every 40000 km (or 24000 miles)
 
 
According to the European MT-07 owners manual:
 
Screen%20Shot%202014-07-01%20at%2010.33.49%20AM.png
 
 
If someone is interested in a copy  of the European manual, just le me know. I can put up a download link if that's allowed. 
 
 
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Cruizin
Yes, allowed!

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Guru
CLICK HERE if you would like to download a European MT-07 manual  8-)
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Guest ybcheese
Guru thaks for the link, much appreciated. I downloaded and will enjoy it later. !!
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Guest brickst3r
I'm told that Yamaha recommends 87 octane, which surprises me. Also, first service is at 600 miles, oil change and as important, Throttle body sync.
What is a throttle body sync? 

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TwistedTorque
I'm told that Yamaha recommends 87 octane, which surprises me. Also, first service is at 600 miles, oil change and as important, Throttle body sync.
What is a throttle body sync? 
The throttle body is a unit that controls the air intake into the engine even during idle. There can be more than one TB: IE One per cylinder each responsible for the air intake for that particular one. As part of the first service, and routine maintenance, the TB's are checked to ensure consistency across the cylinders so one isn't working harder than the other. 
That is about as high level as I know. You can find a ton of videos about what that process entails.
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Cruizin
The TBI Sync is important, and I recomend it being done once per riding year. The first TBI sync is the most important.
 
On my other bikes, the dealers wanted $250 to do it and the first oil change. Screw that! I changed my own oil and then paid a private shop $60 for the TBI Sync.

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Guest brickst3r
Cool good to know. I will try and do my own services. I already do them on my car, just hope it's about the same process just different locations.

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Cruizin
Gotta have the gauges to read the pressures.

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xcsp
A factory service manual is worth having.
 
On the throttle body sync, will be interesting to see what owners of the 07 find-if the tb's are in or out of sync at the recommended intervals to check them.
 
 
 
 

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MeanMug
The mechanic at my dealer also recommended 93 octane (premium ) and he also said startron or the yamaha version is recommended. I have had good results with Startron too. Especially for off season fuel storage.

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Cruizin
Part of the reason for high octane fuel is because the USA has dirty gas. I remember the days of clean purple gas. It was all high octane.
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qjohnson
So some people are saying 87 octane and the euro manual is saying 95. So which one is it? Haha. Is it premium or regular? Anybody run both and see which one the bike likes better?

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mjh937
The US manual says regular, unless knocking or pinging occurs, then it recommends a different brand or premium. I am not sure why it would be different in Europe.

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fechner
I think the US manual says "87 or better", I just filled up with 93 - Haven't noticed any differences. With such a small fuel tank the cost is negligible, I just want to use what's best for the bike.

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Guru
I have tried to explain the fuel confusion HERE

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qjohnson
I think I'll try out premium and see how it goes. The cost difference is so little for such a small tank I might as well get the better stuff.

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mericc
Day I bought my bike, the dealer hooked up with 91 from shell, so I've been using 91 ever since

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carnav0r
The naming of gas leads a lot to confusion. Premium does not mean its actaully better. The difference between grades(types) of gas is when the gas actaully combusts. The FZ-07 as a compression ratio of 11.5:1. That means at top dead center the air and fuel mixture in the cylinder is compressed to 11.5 times that of the sea level atmosphere. This is well in the range of 87 octane. 87 does not mean the fuel is any worse or any better. 87 means that it is easier to ignite at a lower pressure.
 
If you use 87 in an engine that is built with a higher compression ratio then it might ignite by compression and and not by the spark, thats when you get the knocking sound.
 
Puting higher "grade" gas into an engine that is made with a lower compression ratio will cause a lost of fuel economy.
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jerryv
I used to sync the carbs on my Triumph thunderbird. It is a 3 cylinder. I built a manometer to monitor the vacuum as I turned the screws. Is this the same thing they do to fuel injected bikes like ours?

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qjohnson
Where I live it's either 87, 91, or 93. I'll prolly go with 91.

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