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KamelReds

Stripped Oil Pan (re: I'm an idiot.)

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KamelReds
Long story short: 
 
Even though I hand threaded and tightened the plug all the way down, then used a torque wrench set to 15lbs, I somehow stripped my oil pan.  Not really sure how I did it other than it was extremely tight and hard to get off the pan and I'm wondering if the last person to change my oil over-torqued.
 
 
I will eventually be buying a new pan and gasket and replacing it.
 
Has anyone ever had experience with using an oversize plug as a temporary fix?  I've never done so, so I'm curious as to how to do it and how reliable it will be in the interim.

It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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jake
Tapping out a bigger hole is not an issue if you have never done it have a reliable shop do it.
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2015 FZ-07 2003 2014 GSXR 1000

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KamelReds
Tapping out a bigger hole is not an issue if you have never done it have a reliable shop do it.
I've retapped things before just not an oil pan, anything I should know about this?  I was thinking about picking up a helicoil repair kit and just doing that, hoping that I wouldn't have to replace the pan at all if I did so.
 
Or should I just rent a rethread set from Autozone and do it that way?  Then find the bolt to match?
 
EDIT: I'm not at home, so don't have access to service manual -- anyone know what size bolt is used for the plug?
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It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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jake
Tapping out a bigger hole is not an issue if you have never done it have a reliable shop do it.
I've retapped things before just not an oil pan, anything I should know about this?  I was thinking about picking up a helicoil repair kit and just doing that, hoping that I wouldn't have to replace the pan at all if I did so. 
Or should I just rent a rethread set from Autozone and do it that way?  Then find the bolt to match?
 
EDIT: I'm not at home, so don't have access to service manual -- anyone know what size bolt is used for the plug?
I hate tapping aluminum I always F it up... But I would just drill it tap it or put in a coil you have options. A kit with all the tools would be nice. Looks like a 14mm x 1.5
 

2015 FZ-07 2003 2014 GSXR 1000

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jmacas87
are you sure it's completely stripped? You may try a thread chaser at the very least IIRC it's an m14x1.5 thread.
 
If it's at a point of no return:
 
If you don't already have access to an m14 helicoil repair kit, you can use that however if you don't the cost of a kit is almost as much as the pan itself.
 
You could size up to an m16 drain bolt. An m16 tap could be had relatively cheap, and the tap hole size is already close to your existing stripped hole.
 
 
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ravenlord
For 70 bucks you are probably better off just RTVing or you gasket sealer of choice the drain bolt in place (unless it is more or less holding already) and replacing the entire pan. Not worth the hassle at that price.

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KamelReds
I hate tapping aluminum I always F it up... But I would just drill it tap it or put in a coil you have options. A kit with all the tools would be nice. Looks like a 14mm x 1.5
 
That was my concern, I've never done aluminum and I just have the feeling I would mess it up.
 

are you sure it's completely stripped? You may try a thread chaser at the very least IIRC it's an m14x1.5 thread. 
If it's at a point of no return:
 
If you don't already have access to an m14 helicoil repair kit, you can use that however if you don't the cost of a kit is almost as much as the pan itself.
 
You could size up to an m16 drain bolt. An m16 tap could be had relatively cheap, and the tap hole size is already close to your existing stripped hole.
 
Oh it's definitely done, the threads came out with the bolt in one complete piece.
 

For 70 bucks you are probably better off just RTVing or you gasket sealer of choice the drain bolt in place (unless it is more or less holding already) and replacing the entire pan. Not worth the hassle at that price.
 
This is more like a temporary fix as I was trying to make two rides this coming weekend. Probably just going to RTV it for the rides and get a new pan in the coming weeks, I just didn't want to pay overnight shipping to make it to these rides.
 
 
 

It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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jake
I would not just RTV it if it was me just my 2 cents. I would tap it with the closet next size what ever thread and then RTV a bolt in for a temp fix.
If that plug falls out while you are riding the cost of a oil pan will be the least of your worries.
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2015 FZ-07 2003 2014 GSXR 1000

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KamelReds
I would not just RTV it if it was me just my 2 cents. I would tap it with the closet next size what ever thread and then RTV a bolt in for a temp fix. If that plug falls out while you are riding the cost of a oil pan will be the least of your worries.
Probably going to do this.  I'm going to try to retap to a larger size and see if it holds, if it doesn't, then I'll add some RTV and ride through the weekend. 
 
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It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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jake
make sure you flush out your shavings from tapping.
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2015 FZ-07 2003 2014 GSXR 1000

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KamelReds
make sure you flush out your shavings from tapping.
What do you think about just doing an oversized plug instead of rethreading?  I don't want to put too much work into what will be a one week temp fix until the pan comes in.

It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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hobbs
Did you check any local machine shops? Can only speak locally, but I've had similar repairs done for not much more than about 20 bucks. That is of course taking the clean, prepped part to them and not the whole bike. That might complicate things a little.
 
To fit an oversized plug you would still have to drill and tap a larger orifice.

Everything went braap.

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KamelReds
Did you check any local machine shops? Can only speak locally, but I've had similar repairs done for not much more than about 20 bucks. That is of course taking the clean, prepped part to them and not the whole bike. That might complicate things a little. 
To fit an oversized plug you would still have to drill and tap a larger orifice.
I haven't, but if I'm pulling the drain pan I am going to be replacing it. 
An oversized plug is a plug that threads/taps the hole as it's put in place.  They usually don't require drilling of any kind -- they look like this.
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It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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jake
It looks legit
 
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2015 FZ-07 2003 2014 GSXR 1000

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hobbs
Ahh I see, I thought you meant just stuffing a larger bolt in there. Nifty little item, couldn't make it any worse than it is I suppose.

Everything went braap.

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norcal616
In my 10+ yrs of working with alum on a daily basis, i make some of the worlds largest radiators... The oil pan is nothing more than a powdered aluminum cast mold...extremely light but brittle, your better off buying a new pan unless you can actually use a TIG welder to plug the hole and retap it, even then it would be difficult due to not known nature/quality of powered alum and also Without known how much build up of material is around the drain plug to make a bigger bolt hole, you run the risk of cracking the build up as you get closer to the edge of it...
 
My solution is to drop the pan and use Titanium putty if you can buy it locally.. First clran the pan, stick it your oven at 150° for an hr, then coat the drain plug with putty and and pop it back in till you get a new pan...gotta let it cure 24hrs...  Very similar to how we repair busted bolt holes in castings at work...this solution is not recommended if you need to change your oil again :\\
 
 
Edit: my solution cost $20 more than a new pan... Eeekkk 
 
 
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2015 fz-07- Hordpower Edition...2015 fj-09- 120whp- Graves Exhaust w/Woolich Race Kit- tuned by 2WDW
 

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KamelReds
Thanks for the help all, doing a M14x1.5 oversized +1 was the trick as far as a temp solution. New pan and everything should be here next week.
 
I also grabbed some Mobil1 "High Mileage" Synthetic oil that according to all info on the bottle matched what works for our bike, not only was it cheaper than Yamalube, but it makes the transmission less clunky.  This is just to keep the bike running until I replace the pan, local yamaha shop was closed by the time I was off work.

It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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rick
That oil will be better than no oil and might have the proper viscosity rating, but it's probably missing additives to deal with the shear that's present in a gearbox and likely has all manner of friction modifiers not friendly to a wet clutch.
 
When you've swapped out the oil pan, switch to either a semi or full synth oil meant to be in a motorcycle with a unit gearbox and wet clutch. Most auto parts stores will carry Mobil 1 or Valvoline versions. All bike shops will give other choices as well. There are far better choices and Yamalube is way overpriced anyway for what ya get, imo

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KamelReds
That oil will be better than no oil and might have the proper viscosity rating, but it's probably missing additives to deal with the shear that's present in a gearbox and likely has all manner of friction modifiers not friendly to a wet clutch. 
When you've swapped out the oil pan, switch to either a semi or full synth oil meant to be in a motorcycle with a unit gearbox and wet clutch. Most auto parts stores will carry Mobil 1 or Valvoline versions. All bike shops will give other choices as well. There are far better choices and Yamalube is way overpriced anyway for what ya get, imo
I looked at more than the weight, I checked to make sure it wasn't "energy conserving" or "resource conserving" which is the auto oil that makes wet clutches slip.   
Chart tells you what you can use in a bike:
IZp3dq4.jpg

It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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rick
Well, not being energy is good, but still - what makes it special for high mileage (additives you won't need) and how well will it deal with the shear forces that come with a unit gearbox? Gear oils are designed to be in gear boxes, but you'd never run it in a motor.
 
Most cars - especially worn out ones - will rarely see RPMs over 3k, our bikes don't make real power until 5k.
 
Motorcycle oils are usually more expensive for a reason (or more). Only "car" oil I'd use in a bike would be maybe full synth Shell RotellaT - pretty tough stuff meant for diesel motors. In the scheme of things, oil is cheap - even if it says Amsoil on the bottle.
 
Put a magnetic drain plug in your new case (you'll be surprised by how much metal spooge the filter misses). If you have a whole lot of metal on that magnet after your 1st change - change to a more purpose-built oil.

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jmacas87
Well, not being energy is good, but still - what makes it special for high mileage (additives you won't need) and how well will it deal with the shear forces that come with a unit gearbox? Gear oils are designed to be in gear boxes, but you'd never run it in a motor.  
Most cars - especially worn out ones - will rarely see RPMs over 3k, our bikes don't make real power until 5k.
 
Motorcycle oils are usually more expensive for a reason (or more). Only "car" oil I'd use in a bike would be maybe full synth Shell RotellaT - pretty tough stuff meant for diesel motors. In the scheme of things, oil is cheap - even if it says Amsoil on the bottle.
 
Put a magnetic drain plug in your new case (you'll be surprised by how much metal spooge the filter misses). If you have a whole lot of metal on that magnet after your 1st change - change to a more purpose-built oil.
agreed here.  
I'm no oil snob but at least make sure the oil you use is JASO-MA certified. Cert ratings are labeled on the back of the container.  That's the cert that ensures it's rated for motorcycles.
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gregjet
Personally I would have retapped a bigger hole for a bigger bolt. It makes it empty easier. Magnetic plug easy to get in larger sizes. I use to do it on my racing bikes for that reason. Plenty of quality drain plugs available. The problem is that where you are the pan is so cheap the tap would be almost as expensive as the pan. The pan is 4 times the price in Aus ( price gouging capital of the world).
BTW High quality synthetic Diesel oil in the correct grade is perfectly fine in motorcycles. It lasts well and doesn't have friction modifiers in it. It works well and won't hurt your wet clutch. Found this out in a fantastic discussion on a US Ducati site where a discussion ( note "discussion", not argument) occurred between 3 oil engineers. All of them use the aforementioned in their bikes rather than "motorcycle oil.

Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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rick
Personally I would have retapped a bigger hole for a bigger bolt. It makes it empty easier. Magnetic plug easy to get in larger sizes. I use to do it on my racing bikes for that reason. Plenty of quality drain plugs available. The problem is that where you are the pan is so cheap the tap would be almost as expensive as the pan. The pan is 4 times the price in Aus ( price gouging capital of the world). BTW High quality synthetic Diesel oil in the correct grade is perfectly fine in motorcycles. It lasts well and doesn't have friction modifiers in it. It works well and won't hurt your wet clutch. Found this out in a fantastic discussion on a US Ducati site where a discussion ( note "discussion", not argument) occurred between 3 oil engineers. All of them use the aforementioned in their bikes rather than "motorcycle oil.
Parts for this bike are just crazy cheap - well, at least here. 
Yep, that RotellaT Synth is diesel oil. Lots of guys on the Aprilia forum sing praise for the stuff.  It's available pretty much anywhere by the gallon - including Wallyworld 

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derekfz
15 lbs? The manual says 31 I torqued mine to 31 foot pounds. No problems at all for me. Maybe you kept going after the torque wrench clicked?

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