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moonlit

FZ07 for my first bike?

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moonlit
Hello!
My name is Nick, I live in Atlanta GA, and I have been seriously considering getting a pre-owned FZ07.
 
A bit about me:
19 years old, No I'm not your typical 19 year old wanting a bike, I won't be doing wheelies, or anything of the sort, just want to enjoy the world around me, through a new set of eyes.. full time job, currently drive a car (Ford fusion) and I've been trying to get into bikes for a while now.
I'm at 6ft, and just a smudge over 300lbs, yes, it's a lot, but I am working on it.
My question is; will I be able to ride the Fz07? Will it break from the weight?
I'm absolutely in love with the bike, love everything about it. The looks, the sound, ect. Once I do a bit more research, and make sure that I'll be able to ride it, I hope to be on one by the end of the month (I'm going to take my test within the next week or so for my permit.)
 
Also; I know a lot of people suggest 250-500cc bikes for starters, but I don't think that it will be able to hold up on the interstate, with my weight, and size considered.
 
Thanks so much in advance for the help, and I hope to become a part of this community soon :)
 

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pattonme

you've be fine (subframe structurally) and being a new rider and all you don't know any better (yet), but crank that shock to max spring preload. Ride and ride and ride some more. Invent excuses to go ride.
 
Practice your new-found starting and braking drills in convenient, open parking lots and such. And do it a lot. Do reasonably tight figure-eights around islands and other convenient items so you practice steady throttle control, clutch control as needed and most importantly getting your head cranked hard over. Think of it as willing your bike and body to follow your head. Your chin leads the way of your intended path.
 
 

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moonlit
you've be fine (subframe structurally) and being a new rider and all you don't know any better (yet), but crank that shock to max spring preload. Ride and ride and ride some more. Invent excuses to go ride.  
Practice your new-found starting and braking drills in convenient, open parking lots and such. And do it a lot. Do reasonably tight figure-eights around islands and other convenient items so you practice steady throttle control, clutch control as needed and most importantly getting your head cranked hard over. Think of it as willing your bike and body to follow your head. Your chin leads the way of your intended path.
 

Thanks mate  

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Zephyr

Go for it if you can find one that you like. Meanwhile find one at a dealer and go sit on it, fondle it, etc. to see how you fit on it and if you're comfortable. The bike is rated for something like 385 lbs (total additional weight) if I recall, so I think you'll be good to go weight wise. Get into the next MSF course available in your area. Ride safe and watch out for that city traffic. I would avoid the interstate for a bit while you get a feel for the bike, but that's just me.

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moonlit

Another question: Should I buy new; or used? There's only one that I can find in ATL that's used, and it has almost 35k miles. Not sure what to do 0.0

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Guest 2wheeler

Hi Nick,
 
I'm likely to hear some crap for what I'm going to say, but I ABSOLUTELY do not consider the FZ-07 a starter bike. That comes with one big exception, and that is if you have some serious experience riding dirt motorcycles, and fairly powerful ones at that.
 
The two problems with the FZ-07 for a newbie are the right-off-idle torque and the engine braking. You don't need to look far on youtube to see that the FZ-07 is a wheelie monster. That can translate into easily and accidentally popping wheelies in at least 1st gear when you seriously do not want to. Regardless of you flipping the bike, it would be easy for you to get out of control in bad places like right in the middle of an intersection during rush hour. The engine braking could also get you in serious trouble if you let the clutch out with the bike being in a much lower gear than you thought you were in. While compared to other bikes, the FZ-07's 75 horsepower may not seem like a lot, but it is the power delivery that makes this bike a potential wreck waiting to happen for a newbie.
 
I have no idea what your riding experience is, but if you are a guy who knows how to ride a motorcycle by riding friend's bikes but has never owned a motorcycle, I would consider going the 250-500cc route, and defintely buy used, then upgrade in a year. If you are a dirt bike guy, and have owned either 2-stroke MX bikes or big 4-stroke MX bikes, well have at it and enjoy the heck out of your new FZ-07.
 
If you decide to get one and you are a true newbie, I would highly recommend getting the ECU flashed by 2WDW (2 Wheel DynoWorks) after you get the bike. They are a vendor on this forum, and they will tweak your computer (ECU) where the power hit is smoothed out and the engine braking is cut in half. It is an awesome upgrade that is worth every penny. It makes the bike much more rideable.
 
Whatever you end up doing, ride safe.
 

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sorkyah

Welcome @moonlit
 
Im not going to agree 100% with @2wheeler above me about this being a beginner's bike. Getting the instruction will help you more than just getting your permit and teaching yourself. It is lightweight and torquey, but taking a riders course through msf or ycrs would be the best way to teach you to deal with that power. Most of what else he says though is spot on.
 
With your weight i dont see this bike being an issue for you. I was 250 when i bought the bike, have since lost a bit. i do believe there are other husky fellas riding it around on here as well. The extra weight does help a little with the lightweight front of this bike, but not aa much as youd think. I was still wheelieing under hard accel.
 
One key thing, gear up.
If you're serious about persuing a motorcycle, buy gear alongside or before you purchase your bike


ATGATT... ATTATT, two acronyms I live by.
 

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hamster

Hey Nick, welcome!
 
I'd go for it, but in Europe you can limit it (this is for new license riders in Europe), I just found on eBay a kit that would allow you to limit the throttle movement, therefore the power delivery:
 
http://vi.raptor.ebaydesc.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItemDescV4&item=321483435547&category=179753&pm=1&ds=0&t=1486128933754
 
It is removable later and comes with fitment instructions. This just limits the upper rpm range, but you can still hit 80-90mph. :)
 
And I agree with pattonme, and sign up for the MSF course! :))
 
 

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Safe riding!

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Eastern Kayaker

Since you are 19 and a new rider, make sure you get estimates for insurance. A few members purchased their bike first and were surprised by the cost of insurance. Insurance can be very expensive for young new riders. 

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Guest 2wheeler
Since you are 19 and a new rider, make sure you get estimates for insurance. A few members purchased their bike first and were surprised by the cost of insurance. Insurance can be very expensive for young new riders. 
Check with Dairyland as they don't consider the FZ-07 a sport bike. I dropped my rate dramatically by coming with them, as in $920 to $383 for full coverage. 
 
 
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Duke

I'm on board with what @2wheeler said here.
 
I was looking for my first bike 2 years ago and was also deciding on whether I should start with a 300cc or 600cc bike.
 
After starting on a 250cc and then upgrading to the FZ-07 1.5 years later, I would definitely recommend that route. As a brand new rider, starting on an 700cc would've been too much bike for me. And let's be realistic, as a new rider, you're bound to ding/drop/stall/etc. the bike more than once. So it'll hurt your ego and wallet less when you ding up a 250cc instead of that expensive FZ-07. As careful as you think you'll be, you will drop the bike (not even at high speeds either, usually at the low speeds in an empty parking lot or during a U-turn). It happens. It's called learning. The way I see it is you're done with middle school and now asking if you should go to high school or just jump to college. You know in college, it's much more demanding, has a lot higher costs (classes, books, parking permit, residence) and much less hand-holding/guidance. 
 
At 250-300cc, the bike is much lighter and more forgiving/lenient when you make mistakes in braking, gear shifting, etc. AND it'll help you build confidence as a rider. Also insurance will be lower rate for you since it'll be rating on 300cc instead of 700cc. And you're 19 years old, your insurance is going to be expensive already, no need to add in another reason for them to hike it up even higher.
 
If I had to start over, I'd get a used dual sport bike like the Yamaha WR250R because it's built to take abuse and keep going. And since it's dual sport, I would still be able to keep the bike for off-roading and such while getting the FZ-07 as a second bike. That way you now have 2 bikes to enjoy 2 different modes of riding.
 
Lastly, take an MSF course before considering buying anything! It'll give you a better idea of what riding is like. And if you could handle their rental bikes (usually 125cc or 250cc) like a superstar then it'll give you an idea on whether or not you could handle a 700cc bike.


You do you and I'll do me.

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Beemer

With your concerns about your weight I can't help but think the monster torque on this 689cc bike is going to be a huge plus compared to any 250 or 500. At 300 lbs. those bikes are going to feel wimpy to you and no one wants a bike that is slow to get them up to speed, especially on highways. I think the FZ-07 will do the job just fine. Just be careful of how much & how fast you twist the throttle, even at 300 lbs. this bike can surprise you but I really believe you'll need the extra torque & power to be satisfied for awhile or else with anything less you'll just end up trading up for something more powerful too soon. The suspension on this bike isn't the best so you may want to upgrade that anyway if you get one. GL!
 


Beemer

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Duke

Ahh yes, forgot about your height and weight. A 250cc/300cc won't be adequate which means on a 689cc bike, you'll have to be extra diligent! Good luck!


You do you and I'll do me.

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pattonme

I would normally say buy used - you should get a decent price break and the PO often has spent some money on upgrades. My first bike was a CB750 with 40,000 miles on it. Ran good for another 50,000 before I sold it. Those kind of mile I would expect a price comfortably south of 3K and ideally bumping around the 2K point.
 
And *absolutely* git thee to a MSF or other training course before riding your bike even so much as an inch. Also you don't need collision coverage since you should be buying that one for cash.
 
Otherwise look at the used bike listings for a NON-sportbike in the 400-600cc class. You should be able to find an 8+ year old SV650 in fine fettle for little money.


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Guest 2wheeler

A good family of used bikes are the Yamaha in-line four cylinders that went under the Seca and Maxim names. They came mostly in the 550, 650 and 750 sizes although they also made 600, 700 and 900 sizes too. All of these bikes are a good buy as they are stone reliable, and very forgiving. They would have plenty of power for your weight, but due to the power delivery, are very easy to ride. They typically go for $1500 in good condition.
 
Another good one would be the Honda 750 Nighthawk. It's basically the Honda version of the Yamahas.
 

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twoxo7

Hi Nick.
I too am a new rider and bought my FZ the same week that I finished the MSF course. The bike does have pretty strong engine braking and I've had the front wheel lift slightly on me once. I've never ridden before the course and wouldn't have known that there was a problem with engine brake, etc , if not for reviews and this forum ( would have thought that it was normal for motorcycles). I've found that it just made me extra cautious when riding. And in my opinion that's a good thing. I bought mine new btw. The prices I found for used wasn't that much off from new. Well good luck to you and I highly recommend the msf course. I plan on taking the advanced course once the season starts.

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peteinpa

The FZ-07 is a great starter bike. Low weight, low seat height, good power.
 
If you always remember the throttle twists both ways your golden.

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Got new red 2015 FZ-07 on 7/22/16!
Black 2006 Honda ST1300 53K miles.

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reboot

I can't add anything that other have not said. I am in the "start on a 250" group but weight will be an issue on those cc bikes. Take the MSF class before even looking at bikes, pass that then start window shopping.

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pattybags

I'm 290 lbs myself. The FZ-07 is my first bike.
 
Make sure to take an MSF course. Respect the throttle and you'll be fine.
 
Oh yeah, and I bought my bike brand new.  I had 0 experience with motorcycles, so I wouldn't have been able to tell if a used bike was good or not.  So I just bought it brand new and I'm learning about the bike as I go along.
 
 
 

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xcarbonsteelx

I'll chime in too.
 
This was also my first bike with zero ridding experience. When I first starting riding it I weighed about 250 and am 6'1".
 
I second taking a MSF. If you ride within your limits, practice what others have already mentioned then IMHO you'll be fine. Once you start to get cocky is when you'll run into issues with the torque (I know from experience).
 
The 07 is a great motorcycle and I say go for it!


- xCarbonSteelx

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azuryn

I think it could be a good starter bike if you take your time and be cautious. That engine braking can be a pain to deal with until you get used it. (Rev-matching helps a lot.) But I think you might have to pay quite a bit on insurance if that is a deterrent at all, you are young with I am presuming new class M permit/license on a high cc sport bike. MSF course really is invaluable, I took it while never have been on a bike and after a few hours of struggle felt pretty confident.
 
 

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jmacas87

My 2 cents.
 
For your size/weight, I'm gonna agree with some folks here. I think the fz-07 will be fine for a starter bike, but BE MINDFULL of the throttle since these bikes are torquey and engine braking is very pronounced.
 
Ideally, get a flash or exhaust/flash as soon as you can since it can help smooth out some of the low speed abruptness.
 
Be buttery smooth on that throttle, and the rest of the fz-07 is newbie friendly. It's flickable, easy to put a foot down, and the riding position is relaxed. One of the best things about this bike is that newbies AND veterans enjoy this bike. That's not always a trait on many bikes...
 
 

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username

 
[span]    [/span]This was my first bike and I had 0 dirt bike or road experience and no safety courses. Bought new and luckily haven't crashed it yet or rested it on the road. Honestly just practice when your alert and awake and in a area you know well and you will be amazed at how fast you get used to the bike. Like everyone says don't be an idiot on it and try doing dank whoolies off the hop and you'll be golden! I would go used do to the fact that you'll hopefully find one with an EJK or fuel programmer which really smooths out the throttle which can catch you off guard while just starting out. Tis pretty snappy without the programmer I found. The good thing about used is you'll save a bit and be able to buy them lovely upgrades with your savings.
 
[span]    [/span]People say start small but I think poo on that because it's just a hassle switching to another bike in a month or so when you get the idea you are too slow with a 250 cc or in that range. 

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duenan

I think disposition helps. Also make sure you are not a clumsy person.
 
FZ07 was my very first bike as well. And to help the point that you will be fine TC, I weigh 115-120 lbs! and the FZ07 was absolutely fine for me. I did take the MSF course prior to buying.
 
I will say it is not a good bike to start on for everyone. Certain people should really stick with a 300cc starter. But if you truly know yourself (you will be surprised at how many people DO NOT KNOW THEMSELVES), if you are competent and not aggressive, the FZ will be a great starter and/or forever bike.


Engaging with people that have personality disorders on a message board is like arguing with a rock.

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texastj

The FZ is my first bike. I had no previous riding experience, with the exception of taking the MSF course on a 250 Nighthawk. I am pretty chill and just use my bike to cruise around, not do wheelies and what not. Even then, I've had the front wheel come up a bit a time or two unintentionally. Everyone told me to start on a 250cc Ninja, but I didn't listen. Honestly, I am glad I skipped the little bike route and started with the FZ.
 
I bought new because most of the used ones I was seeing weren't discounted enough for me to justify buying them. I also like the fact that I know how it was treated from mile 1.

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