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dkm376

Training Videos for Beginner-Intermediate Rider

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dkm376
Hey guys,
 
I'm a 'new' rider looking for training videos on things like proper cornering, emergency braking, training exercises etc.    I've ridden dirt bikes my whole life, so I'm not completely clueless, but I recognize street riding is a whole new kettle of fish.  I've found it difficult to find training videos that are aimed beyond the absolute basics (i.e. how to use a clutch, throttle, shift gears, etc).  Does anyone have suggestions for riders who know how to operate a motorcycle but want more specifics on road techniques/safety?
 
Cheers,
 
DKM
 

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i28
Definitely take the MSF if you haven't.
 
Then read books like Total Control, Proficient Motorcycling, Motorcycling the right way.
 
Here's another good resource from a guy who teaches people to ride as a MSF instructor and more:
http://www.mcrider.com/
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Zephyr
I've been watching RoadcraftNottingham on YouTube. I think that he's got pretty good stuff, has some well organized playlists (very helpful), and is an instructor himself. I've also watched Twist of the Wrist; SuperBike school; and full series of MSF course videos (will be taking MSF Feb10-12). I've also read the DMV motorcycle manual, which I thought had some good material and just finished the "Proficient Motorcycling" book as well. I enjoyed all of them to varying degrees. I would recommend starting a journal to list out things that you want to try to implement; prioritize the list as you see fit; then make a conscious effort when riding to hone each skill until you complete the list. Then rinse and repeat.
 
 

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pitapola
I've been watching RoadcraftNottingham on YouTube. I think that he's got pretty good stuff, has some well organized playlists (very helpful), and is an instructor himself. I've also watched Twist of the Wrist; SuperBike school; and full series of MSF course videos (will be taking MSF Feb10-12)...
Excuse me for the "spam" but you just made me wonder. The MSF course is only three days long? Like, you take classes for three days and that's it?  
Sorry if this is a stupid question but I'm not from the states.

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mjh937
I've been watching RoadcraftNottingham on YouTube. I think that he's got pretty good stuff, has some well organized playlists (very helpful), and is an instructor himself. I've also watched Twist of the Wrist; SuperBike school; and full series of MSF course videos (will be taking MSF Feb10-12)...
Excuse me for the "spam" but you just made me wonder. The MSF course is only three days long? Like, you take classes for three days and that's it?  
Sorry if this is a stupid question but I'm not from the states.
Actually when I took it it was more like two and a half days.  It was Friday evening in the classroom, Saturday morning riding on the the range, Saturday afternoon classroom (including the written test) and Sunday morning on the range with the testing on the motorcycle early Sunday afternoon.  While it was a good course and definitely worthwhile it is nowhere near as comprehensive as most of the rest of the world.  The truly nutty thing is that when you are done you are legal to ride any motorcycle you want, from a Grom to a Hayabusa.
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pitapola
Actually when I took it it was more like two and a half days.  It was Friday evening in the classroom, Saturday morning riding on the the range, Saturday afternoon classroom (including the written test) and Sunday morning on the range with the testing on the motorcycle early Sunday afternoon.  While it was a good course and definitely worthwhile it is nowhere near as comprehensive as most of the rest of the world.  The truly nutty thing is that when you are done you are legal to ride any motorcycle you want, from a Grom to a Hayabusa.
Holy shiet!  :o 
So a couple of hours on a bike for two days and you're good to go! Enjoy your H2 or Hayabusa! I guess that's got to have something to do with the really high cost of insurance I keep reading about, especially for new riders, huh?
 
Thanks for the reply BTW.
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duenan
Yeah mine was just 2 eight hour days (and second day was only like 4 hours on the range) and I got handed a legal document to ride any motorcycle (well, a waiver that I had to hand over to the licensing and pay for my legal document). And I agree, it is ridiculous. It should be more like other countries with tiers and stuff. Although I admit there are some people who really don't need tiers. But it will still do them good. Well, it would do everyone else good.
 
I only say this because after 3 years of riding, I have rode with many newbies who really have no business riding a motorcycle even after they pass their MSF. The kind of people where you have to think to yourself "dear god they are going to kill themselves".
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Engaging with people that have personality disorders on a message board is like arguing with a rock.

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Zephyr
Yep 2.5 days and you're a pro (SMH). I am happy that we don't have tiers, but it would be nice to have perhaps a beginner's course, intermediate course, and advanced course with minimum 3-6 months period between each class. It would also perhaps be a selling point to drop insurance a bit lower for those who complete all three within say a 24 month period. I think that I did see an advanced MSF course when I signed up for the MSf, but will find out more when I go. I am all for as much training as I can get, especially since there are zero track day options here.
 
Hopefully the video and book suggestions help you out as well.

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gregjet
If you are an experienced dirt rider you are starting from a position of high throttle and dynamic control. This can make you a way better rider on the road than someone who hasn't ridden dirt BUT ...you have to learn the differences and apply them rigorously. You won't be as afraid of the bike moving around unexpectedly as much as road only riders, and you will tend to ride looser, which is an advantage.
My suggestion is watch BOTH twist of the wrist videos. Go to a track day, if at all possible, with a racer or VERY experienced rider and get critique.
The road bike steers much more from the front than in the dirt.
You biggest problem is most likely to be leaning to the wrong side of the bike. That's what happened to me. Made worse because I ride mountain bikes as well. In the dirt often you will push the bike lower than your body position line especially when sliding. You have to chuck this notion for the hard road surfaces. Also you will need to put more weight on the front than in the dirt. More of you weight shifting is side to side rather than forward and back. Particularly down to the inside of the corner.
Most people DON'T do the following because they just fit themselves to the bike rather than vice verse. Because you move so much less on a road bike , it is important to your reaction time and fatigue reduction that you fit the bike to you. Comfort and ergonomics ( including clothing and protective wear) are very important for any real saddle time.
Oh yeah and an extra pair of eyes on each side of your head would help , compared to the dirt, but that tends to be a bit more difficult.

Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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