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jonathsk

"New" FZ-07 and Break-in Question

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jonathsk
I know the "proper" break-in method(s) have been (are) widely debated.  My question is purely circumstantial.
 
I am the second owner of a FZ-07 2016, purchased with only 300 miles.  Oil change done at time of sale.
I don't recall asking the seller about any break-in methods applied.  I rode the bike about 80 miles on highway (70-80 mph) without pushing hard and then another 80 miles just cruising (small portion of the ride going full throttle).  I am just NOW reading about the controversial hard vs. soft break-in.
 
Assuming I prefer the hard break-in method, the bike being at 500 miles, and not knowing if the previous owner followed either method, what should I do?  Is it too late to go through with the hard break-in procedure at this point?  It's been 200 miles since purchase and last oil change, should I change oil/filter?
 
Any suggestions/advice would be appreciated!  I want to increase the longevity of my bike if there's still a way.
 

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CapnKirk
Just enjoy and ride it. It wont make a bit of difference either way.
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Beemer
Since you have 100 miles to go before the start of it being broke in (600-1k miles) you still have plenty of time. Just look at it as the bike being broke in in stages and the last 100 miles is the last step. I wouldn't sweat it.
 

Beemer

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13boutbr

Give this guy a watch on YouTube. He's a motorcycle blogger who also went to school to be a motorcycle mechanic. He makes a great case for hard break ins.

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CarGuy7a
Couldn't agree more with the hard break in method. Those rings need to seat in fast, all the other tolerances in the engine are all ready set to what they need to be. I've raced go carts for many years and every engine we've built, we ran them hard right off the bat. We would start them up and let them get up to temp and let them high idle for about 20 minutes then shut it down and change the oil. Next step of break in was put it on the track and race it. Pretty much every ATV/Motorcycle I've bought or rebuilt I've always broken them in hard with 0 problems. Granted I didn't run my FZ-07 to rev limiter when brand new (because I had to get used to the bike) but I did put plenty of good hard 3/4 throttle pulls on it up to about 7000 to 8000 RPM.

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avanti
Yeah, right... I'm sure everyone with access to the Internet (who can claim anything they wish, btw) knows more than Yamaha about Yamaha engine break-in... so, sure, do whatever ya want!
 
(p.s. Did everyone you went to school with have enough where-with-it to find their a** with both hands? Did any of them who did not graduate, anyway? Now, add to that their paying tuition in any given program???)
 
All the best and Merry Christmas!!!
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13boutbr
Never said hard break in is fact best way to go about it. But many people with mechanical aptitude seem to prefer it. To each their own

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CarGuy7a
Yeah, right... I'm sure everyone with access to the Internet (who can claim anything they wish, btw) knows more than Yamaha about Yamaha engine break-in... so, sure, do whatever ya want!  
(p.s. Did everyone you went to school with have enough where-with-it to find their a** with both hands? Did any of them who did not graduate, anyway? Now, add to that their paying tuition in any given program???)
 
All the best and Merry Christmas!!!
Not bashing your opinion on this but like the video Jake TGS put up explaining how this easy break in thing manufacturers claim in their owner's manual is all because of legal reasons. With the sue happy society we live in today you can practically sue someone for looking at you wrong. Well maybe not that drastic but you get the point. They have to put this in the manual so people who have no clue on how to ride doesn't go out and buy a liter bike and then read in the manual "the best way we recommend breaking in your new engine is to run it hard". Then you have a guy running it full throttle into the side of an 18 wheeler and killing himself and the family sues the bike manufacturer for stating to run it hard in their manual.
 
Besides they run these bikes on a dyno all the way up to rev limiter before they even make it out of the factory to the show room floor so the majority of break in is already done so either way when it comes to brand new motorcycles, it really doesn't matter too much because it's already had that first hard run on it. I believe they also state the easy break in method as a way for the rider to become accustom to how the bike rides and the power of it.
 
I've used this method on every race engine we've built from go carts, atv's, motorcycles, to Chevy small block V8 dirt car engines with zero failures. At the end of hard race seasons we've dis assembled the engines and the cylinders still looked like they were freshly honed with minimal scarring or signs of blow by. Me personally I'm not going off anything the internet says but on experience.
 

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avanti
CarGuy7a, obviously in our litigious society many things are stated conservatively for the reason you state... at least, IN PART. However, Yamaha-esque recommendations aren't as recent as all that. I've been buying and breaking-in new vehicles of all sorts since the '60 and have not in all that time seen any in which it was recommended to drive or ride the h**l out of 'em. Btw, I have never had an issue ever, doing it according to the manufactures' recommendations. But, having worked in a car dealership (yeah, yeah, I know... it's not motorcycles) I have seen the results of an occasional genius who did it differently and typically it wasn't pretty... and, warranty did not cover these.
 
Yousa buy da vehicle, it's yours to treat or mistreat as ya wish... Good luck! (Why do I bother belaboring this... still... only on the off chance I might save just one gullible person who thinks everything they encounter on the Internet is equally valid some needless headaches. I'll not do so further on this topic.)

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johnakay
I've bought a couple of demo bikes with no problems.
my current one is a ex demo with 355 miles on the clock.
I cannot imagine riders taking it for a ride will be babying it from the start.
an old work mate had a new bike he hammered it from the start where as his mate ran it in correctly.
Rob just road it and as it turn out it was faster than his mate who ran it in.
now this going back to the early 80's.
my own personal feeling is that the 1st 100 miles or so running (critical)in should be ok after which gradually bring the revs up and down.
most folks only think of the head area but forgetting the gear box!
gear box do need bedding in.when I run my bike in(short ones 100/200 miles)I alway go on country roads or farmers road.up'n' down in the gears.
never had any problems doing it this way.
most folks sell or pass their bikes on after a couple of years anyway..

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