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aecker22

Lo warning

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aecker22
Hey guys,[div]
 
[/div][div]Have had my bike for a few months, only have around 400 miles on it. Just recently I've been getting a "lo" warning on the dash. Anyone know what that might mean? Doesn't say in the manual, just wondering before I take it in to the shop.[/div]

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Guest Ralph
Is it cold where you are, sounds like a temp warning.

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YZEtc
See page 4-8 of the FZ07F Owner's Manual.

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Guru
When do you get the warning? While riding or after starting the engine?

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missourifz07
Pretty sure that is just the dash telling you to let your bike warm up a lil. If you filter through the modes like outside temp or trip a and so on the low goes away until you get back to the engine temp. Let it warm up and when the engine temperature increases the low should disappear and give you the reading. If other that that, you may need to seek help.
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aecker22
Thanks guys! As for temp, I am in Seattle and the lowest its been when I drove is around 75°. The warning is only when I am starting it up, but I will see if it comes up at any other time. It does seem to go away so maybe it is just a temperature thing. I'll do some more investigation and let you guys know!

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jerryv
Hey guys,[div] 
[/div][div]Have had my bike for a few months, only have around 400 miles on it. Just recently I've been getting a "lo" warning on the dash. Anyone know what that might mean? Doesn't say in the manual, just wondering before I take it in to the shop.[/div]
First time I saw it was today too.   Goes out as soon as engine warms up ... will be useful on those cold mornings soon to be upon some of us.

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GAZ
Don't ride your bike with the 'lo' warning. As with all motorcycles they will need to warm up first before riding. Don't feel bad though, its been a few times that the kick stand kill stater has saved me.
 

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i28
Started getting this code too recently.
It was a little colder than usual lately but how cold can Los Angeles possibly get?
If it's the coolant temperature then it should go away after riding a little but I don't think it did.
Gonna have to keep an eye on this.

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Guru
I am pretty sure the LO warning is normal when you first start up the bike. The coolant temperature is just outside the range of what the gauge is able to display. It should go away pretty quickly. If not, you might have an issue with you thermostat.
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Eastern Kayaker
In the FZ-07 Service Manual page 1-7 it states LO is displayed on the dash under the following conditions: 
1). When the ambient temperature is below 14 degrees Fahrenheit
2). When the coolant temperature is below 104 degrees Fahrenheit
 
 
[attachment id=2504" thumbnail="1]
 
 
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i28
In the FZ-07 Service Manual page 1-7 it states LO is displayed on the dash under the following conditions:  1). When the ambient temperature is below 14 degrees Fahrenheit
2). When the coolant temperature is below 104 degrees Fahrenheit
 

Yep. Ambient temperature was nowhere near that (Maybe mid 50's). Isn't the coolant temperature supposed to rise in a few minutes so the warning should go away as you keep riding?
 
If the temperature is high, it recommends to shut off the bike and let it cool down but the manual doesn't tell you to do anything if it is low.
 

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Eastern Kayaker

Yep. Ambient temperature was nowhere near that (Maybe mid 50's). Isn't the coolant temperature supposed to rise in a few minutes so the warning should go away as you keep riding?
 
If the temperature is high, it recommends to shut off the bike and let it cool down but the manual doesn't tell you to do anything if it is low.

I agree with you and Guru, that the "Lo" warning should go away after riding a short time. I did not see anything in the service manual that covered if the "Lo" warning does not go away after riding the bike. The service manual may cover it, but I did not see anything. Guru mentioned the thermostat could be an issue. Usually if the thermostat does not open or open within a specified temp range the "Hi" temp warning should display on your dash. The thermostat could also be staying open, which is an overcooling issue. This may be the problem causing the "Lo" warning you are getting, but not sure.  There could also be an issue with some part that determines the ambient temperature. I would first see what the "Lo" is related to ambient or cooling. I believe if it is ambient it displays the word air, if related to cooling the word air is not displayed. 
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jhonore
The Lo is not for ambient temperature it is for coolant temp. Until the coolant temp reaches 106 degrees it will say low. Always try to warm up your bike to the min temp before riding. It's only displayed under the temp menu.
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i28
The Lo is not for ambient temperature it is for coolant temp. Until the coolant temp reaches 106 degrees it will say low. Always try to warm up your bike to the min temp before riding. It's only displayed under the temp menu.
Based on the manual, the "Lo" message can display on the ambient or coolant temperature screen (depending on what the display is on at the moment.) Guess I had never left my display on the coolant temperature to notice that message before.
Started my bike up and left it running for 2 minutes and it went away and started to display the temperature at around 105 degrees.
 
This is while being so focused on fixing my current rear brake issue so it just caused me to notice all these little things. B-|
 

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ralph
It's normal as the engine temp comes up it will change to a temperature display,
just ride it gently till the temp comes up.
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Guru
They say it is better just to start the engine and drive off. The 2 minute idling isn't recommended and is a waste of fuel. The engine heats up quicker and more evenly spread (is that even English?) when riding. Just don't pin it and bolt off like a crazy man.
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zsoci
They say it is better just to start the engine and drive off. The 2 minute idling isn't recommended and is a waste of fuel. The engine heats up quicker and more evenly spread (is that even English?) when riding. Just don't pin it and bolt off like a crazy man.
 
 
The same comment I got from the dealer when he saw me waiting to get the bike a bit warmed up after the first oil change. So now I let it run on idle until I put on my helmet and gloves and gentle with it until it fully warms up...
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faffi
This is a bit like discussing what engine oil to use - opinions differ and many have very strong opinions. Personally, I belive warming up at idle is the worst kind of warmup. Why? Because it takes longer to warm the engine up. And what is the case when the engine is cold? Fuel mixture is richer and combustion incomplete, meaning unburned fuel is present in the combustion chamber and cylinder. Petrol is "dry", meaning not only does it not lubricate in any way, it also wash away oil. In this case the oil film from the cylinder walls. The result is metal-to-metal contact between piston rings and cylinder walls. This is also the reason why the majority of engine wear take place just after start-up. Once warm, there is next to no wear to speak of.
 
Another negative of the surplous fuel is that some will leak past the piston rings and dilute the engine oil, shorting the life cycle of the oil.
 
All that said, in reality there will not be a dramatic difference for most owners. People who swear by letting their engines idle themselves warm are unlikely to wear them out rapidly as a result. They will waste a lot of fuel and time in the process, but each to their own. I, however, invariably set off immediately after start-up on every vehicle I own - and have owned. But I never use a lot of revs or throttle until the engine is fully warm.
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7inthe6
When starting the bike, wait for the LO to turn into a number and you are good to go.
like any engine, it needs a minute to get up to operating temps.
 
nothing wrong here! enjoy!

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avanti
In over two years I've never seen this and never ridden when the ambient temp was THAT high.

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tarmac
It's not a code. It just means the engine temp is below the range of the thermometer. Same as when you start a car and the coolant sensor starts in the cold end of the guage. There is absolutely no reason to warm it up while parked, but yous do yous. I just ride gently until about 150F
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Cruizin
That's just yamaha telling you that the bike isn't fully warmed up yet. It's ok and normal to ride it when lo. In fact, it's better to ride off low rpm when lo temp, instead of letting it just idle until it warms up.
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Beemer
That's just yamaha telling you that the bike isn't fully warmed up yet. It's ok and normal to ride it when lo. In fact, it's better to ride off low rpm when lo temp, instead of letting it just idle until it warms up.
Agreed, does it say anywhere in the manual that you have to let it warm up idling before you can take off? Don't think so. Where is this coming from? My father was an air craft/car mechanic and he always told me that if you take off easy (low rpm) while it's cold it will warm up faster and the gears will turn faster, therefore getting oil to the top of the engine quicker where it's needed. It doesn't hurt a thing. Just don't get stupid on the gas before it's warmed up. Stay frosty while warming up. ;) 
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mjh937
My car owners manual says not to let it warm up, just drive gently until the engine is warm. It has almost 200,000 miles now so I must be doing something right.
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