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Zephyr

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Zephyr

Hello all.  Figured that I would do a proper introduction.
 
From the title you can imagine that I live in Hawaii.  Apparently there was another Hawaii Island member who has since become dormant.  
 
I joined not too long ago.  I just got my Motorcycle Permit today.  Missed one question out of 25, so not too bad.  I took the test with a friend and he failed, so I felt a bit guilty about passing.  He did seem less engaged in the process than I am.  I have poured over motorcycle reviews, read riding books, and watched hours of video, whereas I'm not sure that he has done anything other than "dream about a bike".  We both went down to the only street bike dealer on the island (we have a Harley Dealer as well).  Got to sit on the FZ07 for the first time.  It was nice, but not exactly what I had envisioned.  They had some Honda CBR's in stock, a KTM 350 and the FZ07 & FZ09 among others; No XSR900 though :( .  I could probably get the 09 for about as much as the 07, though I think that the 07 is probably the better bike and certainly better for a beginner like me.  They only had the silver / blurple color 07 in stock and none other available (to them) in the islands.  I did not like the blurple color scheme at all, so I passed on the bike ($7800 otd with first break-in service *ie oil change* included).  The price was good, but not the color.  I plan on returning in a few weeks after they get in their next shipment to sit on as many bikes as possible and continue to develop a relationship.  The floor manager on duty was super cool to talk to and was completely understanding when I mentioned that I probably would end up buying from the continental US and shipping the bike over.  I mentioned that I wanted to give them first shot at my business, which is true.  I asked about the Kawasaki Z650, but unfortunately the company in charge of Kawasaki in Hawaii State is charging the local (Hawaii Island) dealer an upcharge if he wants to order a bike, so that we can't really get a Kawasaki here locally anymore without an added $1000 bucks tacked onto the price tag of which the local dealer isn't keen on.  I would need to travel to Oahu, purchase the bike from the monopoly distributor and have the bike shipped over.  Island life in a nutshell.
 
Overall today was a good day.  I suspect that I'll go by the local dealer as much as possible going into the new year.  2017 FZ07's are slated to hit here late Feb / early March if I can hold out that long, otherwise I'll be scouring the web for mainland snow season deals on a 2016 model.  I'm excited to be entering into this journey and can't wait for that first ride.  I will be signing up for the MSF course that will take place in February, so I should have my permanent motorcycle license no later than March 2017.
 
On a side note.  I have seen 3 different FZ07's on the road since joining this forum and expect that there are at least a few more around that I haven't seen.
 
That's all for now.
 
Aloha.

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Beemer

Welcome and congrats on your soon to be FZ. Got any pics of the island since you don't have any of your bike yet? Pics of paradise are always welcome. Tell us more about yourself, you from the main island or one of the smaller ones?

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Beemer

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Zephyr

I've got some pics of the island, but prefer to wait to post "ride" pics as that will give me an excuse to get out more. I'm on Hawaii Island, which is the largest of the island chain "anchoring" the lower right, also known appropriately as the "Big Island". Many people consider the "main" island to be Oahu which is where the state capitol Honolulu, pearl harbor, Waikiki, etc is.

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CapnKirk

Welcome!!
 
Ride Safe,
 
Kirk

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jetgirl

[div]Hi Zephyr! An introduction with some background; I like that.[/div]

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Zephyr

Update:
 
I am soon to be proud owner of 2016 FZ-07 in Armor Gray. After all tax, shipping, etc I will have ~$8,350 invested in the bike. I purchased for $6,200 not including tax and registration. Shipping will cost ~$1698 and tax/reg should be around $450. Delivery won't be until Late January though... 

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hamster

Happy for you, Zephyr!! Great news! I rushed to get an Armor Gray the second time too, as it'll not be available as a 2017 in the US (in Europe they are keeping it!).

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Safe riding!

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Zephyr

Just thinking out loud here for my own thoughts and reference more than for anyone's input, though all opinions are certainly welcome. I have been contemplating mods and what are the more practical functioning / rider experience improvement versus cosmetic / other type upgrades. Here will be my list and the order that I anticipate installing them... I thought about starting a "FZ-07 Must have upgrades" thread, but didn't want to go that route yet. Ultimately I think that it would be helpful to have a list of upgrades that can be voted on to formulate what members think are the best upgrades to get... Any rate - to my list.
 
1. Frame Sliders - Vagabond (Easy install, can be done prior to riding bike off lot)
2. Windscreen - Dart Manta (Considered by many as a must have for freeway / long rides. Can be installed prior to riding bike if desired. I chose the Dart as it appears to be of higher quality than others I have seen)
3. Suspension - Probably the most mentioned complaint against the FZ-07. Where to start & how far to go? I'll probably skip preload, etc and go straight to an entry level shock upgrade. I'm not going to do any racing and will set and forget once I have it adjusted to my liking.
4. ECU Flash - To many this is a must. General overall improvement from factory stock, perhaps a must depending on what other aftermarket items are installed. Also of note is the Boosterplug which has gotten good reviews as well.
5. Lockable Hard Case - (I will most likely do this first as I prefer to lock helmet and jacket into storage as opposed to carrying around a bag with everything in it. I plan on using the motorcycle to travel for work and will not be allowed to carry a bag onto job sites or into meetings. Also I carpool with my boss often who drives a 2016 Corvette. Not much room for large items like a helmet. I don't like the look of the luggage hanging way off the back, so will get the SW-Motech pillion rack and modify to accept Shad 40 Cargo hard case. I like this more compact look and I won't be riding anyone pillion anyways.)
6. R6 Throttle tube - Some swear by it, others may not like an even more abrupt throttle. I like the idea of less wrist rotation to WOT, but will most likely hold off on this one for a while.)
7. Tail Tidy - A must for some. I don't know that I will do this one since by eliminating the stock whale tail you create a problem with rain / mud, so that riding in the rain gets you filthy. Then you need a rear hugger, etc. For me aesthetics aren't more important than functionality. For now at least.)
8. Radiator Guard - This should probably be higher up on the list. Quick and easy protection. No brainer right?
9. Tail light kit - Thus far I have not been impressed with the kits that I have seen. I am paranoid about the brake light and turn signal not being distinguishable enough as they are so close together. Perhaps after a year or so, then we'll see.
10. Exhaust Upgrade - Akropovic is the prom king in this category. I like the (you tube video) sounds of others as well. Specifically M4 and SC Project. Looks also play a major role in this category along with price. Not a must have upgrade and I am not a fan of extremely loud pipes, though I do feel that eventually an exhaust upgrade will be done.
11. Centerstand - SW-Motech Centerstand makes sense to me as an early upgrade. Specifically because you could perhaps get away with the centerstand upgrade over purchasing a rear stand for awhile? I think.
12. Lighting - From aftermarket turn signals to drop in headlights, to full blown custom replacements. There really is no limit to how far accessory and lighting upgrades can go. Here are some ideas that I like thus far: Change out pumpkins to something a bit more discreet; I like the Euro factory signals a lot. Air intake accent lighting; rear undertail accent lighting; bar end turn signals.
13. Mirrors - Many people like to change out the mirrors. If they are functional, then it won't be a high priority for me, though if the stock mirrors do not do the job for me, then I don't think that I would look much further than CRG. They seem to get stellar reviews all around. Not only for good looks but also for low vibration and also for optical quality.
14. Other bits - The list could go on and on. Other items that tick the boxes are adjustable rearsets, additional sliders / crash protection, lever changeouts, brake lines and brake pad upgrades, horn upgrade, chain adjuster upgrade, rear axle nut upgrade, coolants, oils, chains, tires, handlebars, etc etc.
 
Still a great bang for the buck bike. I think so. Even with 1.5k in upgrades..., you'd have a much better bike that would easily outclass it's peers and most likely outclass a good many of it's so called superiors.

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robbo10

You are going to have fun modifying your bike. I initially did crash bungs (wheel spindle and frame). Later I added a rad guard - good for looks as well as protection. I like the seat design very much but it felt too thinly padded so I added extra neoprene foam. I have been thinking of making my own pillion top box but I may never do it.

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Just do it! 

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Beemer

With such a cool machine the native island girls may go primitive and and flash you when they see you on that bike, lucky you! ;)
 
 
 
coconut_bra.jpg
 

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Beemer

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Zephyr

Ha @Beemer. {Insert "Expectation vs Reality" meme here} I'll get flashed by frat boys and ogled by military "boots" out on day passes. SMH

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gregjet

Just a couple of points on your mods.
Crash knobs on the engine: Be careful of the bolts going into the engine. The engine threads are soft. Mine were stripped on the right from the factory. Use a torque wrench to do them up.
 
Suspension: Talk to pattonme on this forum. There are others that may be just as good but I have only experience with him and it has been productive. Front AND back need fixing even for ordinary spirited riding.
 
ECU reflash will make the bike much smoother and nicer to ride . MAKE SURE IT HASN'T ALREADY been flashed or it is possible to brick it.
 
Hard cases: There may be something by now but I had to modify a set of Givi racks to put my hard cases on. The used to be only soft cases and they flopped around. I don't use a top case but do use a tankbag on occasion and if I need more carry space strap a kayak roll seal bag across the top of the hard cases.
 
The seat is not a high point. I went Seat Concepts and love it, but there are others available

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Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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Zephyr
Just a couple of points on your mods. Crash knobs on the engine: Be careful of the bolts going into the engine. The engine threads are soft. Mine were stripped on the right from the factory. Use a torque wrench to do them up.
 
Vagabond utilizes O-rings and compression fit with set screws through the drain holes in the frame.  I specifically chose these for the fact that they do not modify/utilize the engine mount screws.  Thanks for looking out though.
 
Suspension: Talk to pattonme on this forum. There are others that may be just as good but I have only experience with him and it has been productive. Front AND back need fixing even for ordinary spirited riding.
 
Duly noted.
 
ECU reflash will make the bike much smoother and nicer to ride . MAKE SURE IT HASN'T ALREADY been flashed or it is possible to brick it.
 
Bike's brand new, so if it has already been flashed then we have a serious problem.
 
Hard cases: There may be something by now but I had to modify a set of Givi racks to put my hard cases on. The used to be only soft cases and they flopped around. I don't use a top case but do use a tankbag on occasion and if I need more carry space strap a kayak roll seal bag across the top of the hard cases.
 
Plan on modifying the SW-Motech pillion storage replacement to accept the Shad mount so that the SHad 40 is riding pillion.
 
The seat is not a high point. I went Seat Concepts and love it, but there are others available
 
Hmm.  Food for thought.  I guess saddle time will determine if / how quickly this becomes a priority.
 
Thanks for the comments.
 

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Zephyr
Just thinking out loud here for my own thoughts and reference more than for anyone's input, though all opinions are certainly welcome. I have been contemplating mods and what are the more practical functioning / rider experience improvement versus cosmetic / other type upgrades. Here will be my list and the order that I anticipate installing them... I thought about starting a "FZ-07 Must have upgrades" thread, but didn't want to go that route yet. Ultimately I think that it would be helpful to have a list of upgrades that can be voted on to formulate what members think are the best upgrades to get... Any rate - to my list. 
1. Frame Sliders - Vagabond (Easy install, can be done prior to riding bike off lot) Ordered _ Will install when I pick up bike from harbor. (Prior to first ride)
2. Windscreen - Dart Manta (Considered by many as a must have for freeway / long rides. Can be installed prior to riding bike if desired. I chose the Dart as it appears to be of higher quality than others I have seen)  Ordered - Will most likely install when I pick up bike from harbor. (Prior to first ride)
3. Suspension - Probably the most mentioned complaint against the FZ-07. Where to start & how far to go? I'll probably skip preload, etc and go straight to an entry level shock upgrade. I'm not going to do any racing and will set and forget once I have it adjusted to my liking.
4. ECU Flash - To many this is a must. General overall improvement from factory stock, perhaps a must depending on what other aftermarket items are installed. Also of note is the Boosterplug which has gotten good reviews as well.
5. Lockable Hard Case - (I will most likely do this first as I prefer to lock helmet and jacket into storage as opposed to carrying around a bag with everything in it. I plan on using the motorcycle to travel for work and will not be allowed to carry a bag onto job sites or into meetings. Also I carpool with my boss often who drives a 2016 Corvette. Not much room for large items like a helmet. I don't like the look of the luggage hanging way off the back, so will get the SW-Motech pillion rack and modify to accept Shad 40 Cargo hard case. I like this more compact look and I won't be riding anyone pillion anyways.)  Ordered.  I hope to have modified and ready for mounting when bike arrives.  The SW-Motech pillion rack is back ordered with an expected delivery of ~3-5weeks.  If it arrives and I can mod prior to bike arrival, then this also will be installed prior to first ride.
6. R6 Throttle tube - Some swear by it, others may not like an even more abrupt throttle. I like the idea of less wrist rotation to WOT, but will most likely hold off on this one for a while.)
7. Tail Tidy - A must for some. I don't know that I will do this one since by eliminating the stock whale tail you create a problem with rain / mud, so that riding in the rain gets you filthy. Then you need a rear hugger, etc. For me aesthetics aren't more important than functionality. For now at least.)
8. Radiator Guard - This should probably be higher up on the list. Quick and easy protection. No brainer right?  Ordered.  Should be installed prior to first ride.  We'll see.
9. Tail light kit - Thus far I have not been impressed with the kits that I have seen. I am paranoid about the brake light and turn signal not being distinguishable enough as they are so close together. Perhaps after a year or so, then we'll see.
10. Exhaust Upgrade - Akropovic is the prom king in this category. I like the (you tube video) sounds of others as well. Specifically M4 and SC Project. Looks also play a major role in this category along with price. Not a must have upgrade and I am not a fan of extremely loud pipes, though I do feel that eventually an exhaust upgrade will be done.
11. Centerstand - SW-Motech Centerstand makes sense to me as an early upgrade. Specifically because you could perhaps get away with the centerstand upgrade over purchasing a rear stand for awhile? I think.  Ordered.  Will most likely install once I get the bike home.  We'll see how I like the sidestand at first, but practically speaking the centerstand makes the most sense.
12. Lighting - From aftermarket turn signals to drop in headlights, to full blown custom replacements. There really is no limit to how far accessory and lighting upgrades can go. Here are some ideas that I like thus far: Change out pumpkins to something a bit more discreet; I like the Euro factory signals a lot. Air intake accent lighting; rear undertail accent lighting; bar end turn signals.
13. Mirrors - Many people like to change out the mirrors. If they are functional, then it won't be a high priority for me, though if the stock mirrors do not do the job for me, then I don't think that I would look much further than CRG. They seem to get stellar reviews all around. Not only for good looks but also for low vibration and also for optical quality.
14. Other bits - The list could go on and on. Other items that tick the boxes are adjustable rearsets, additional sliders / crash protection, lever changeouts, brake lines and brake pad upgrades, horn upgrade, chain adjuster upgrade, rear axle nut upgrade, coolants, oils, chains, tires, handlebars, etc etc.
 
Still a great bang for the buck bike. I think so. Even with 1.5k in upgrades..., you'd have a much better bike that would easily outclass it's peers and most likely outclass a good many of it's so called superiors.
 

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axemanblue

Congrats on the upcoming purchase and welcome to the forum. I had to go back and re-read your intro after seeing your mods list. When I was a brand new rider I didn't know what half the mods you listed even were! Are you a dirt-biker or come from an auto/mechanical background?
 
You covered a lot of bases, so I don't really think there's much more to add for a brand new bike. But since you mentioned rubber I thought I'd ask if you're doing "spirited" riding. I'm not sure what the streets are like in Hawaii but with the elevation changes there I'd imagine you have some nice roads to carve into that the PR3s aren't really the best for.

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Zephyr
Congrats on the upcoming purchase and welcome to the forum. I had to go back and re-read your intro after seeing your mods list. When I was a brand new rider I didn't know what half the mods you listed even were! Are you a dirt-biker or come from an auto/mechanical background? 
You covered a lot of bases, so I don't really think there's much more to add for a brand new bike. But since you mentioned rubber I thought I'd ask if you're doing "spirited" riding. I'm not sure what the streets are like in Hawaii but with the elevation changes there I'd imagine you have some nice roads to carve into that the PR3s aren't really the best for.
No real riding background.  I am a mechanical engineer, so by nature am very detailed and research most things rather thoroughly before moving.  Though once I decide to move I am all out, all the way.  Unfortunately the roads are a mixed bag here.  There are some decent twisties south of where I live, but the speed limit is very low (30ish) and the road leads to nowhere (unless you're trying to get to the other side of the island).  Everything heading north into town are mostly straight with a ton of elevation change and traffic (I live at 1250ft and town is at sea level ~16 miles away)  There is a nice twisty road from here down to the beach but again it has a low speed limit, narrow, and residential.  That road drops the same 1250ft in elevation in 4 miles.
 
 
No superb canyon runs or anything and no track either.  There are a few roads that should offer a nice combination of curves and cruising, specifically one heading from Kona (area that I live) into Waimea at the north end of the island.  That would be a specific "ride" day as there isn't anything in Waimea that I would need to make the trip for.  I have heard great things about the PR3's and have them in the back of my mind for the replacements once the stock tires are used up, unless something better has hit the market.
 
 
Thanks for chiming in!

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axemanblue

Ah, got it. Yeah, if the MEs I knew in college were college were inclined to ride I could see them being as thorough as you from the outset. ;-)
 
For some people modding the hell out of a bike is half the fun of having one at all, and I respect that. But I also think there's something cool to starting out with a capable but near-stock bike, getting a couple thousand miles out of it, and then doing performance mods on it. Because then you'll be able to really get the difference and appreciate it more. And if your experience is anything like mine, when you first start out you don't miss what you've never had.
 
My first bike was a bone stock Ninja 650. I would have loved to put a pipe on it (stock sounded like a cross between a helicopter and a consistent fart). And I would ALWAYS recommend frame sliders for newbs, as the infamous Low Speed Drop is a near-universal experience. And cosmetic mods are fine, in my book. But unlike you I didn't know squat about suspension adjustments, braided lines, ECU flashes, or even good rubber. And still I took that thing to the canyons every weekend, usually twice a weekend, for three months straight. Was I hauling ass? No, I was a newb and guys blew by me regularly. But I also didn't know what feeling planted in a corner actually felt like, so I was also fearless--because I didn't know what I didn't know.
 
So ten months and 8k miles later, when I got a better bike it was the best thing to me since sliced bread. I could barely believe the difference. So I think being able to really utilize and appreciate the upgrades is what some people miss out on when they start on really well-sorted bikes.
 
I'm just offering my opinion so do take it FWIW. I'm certainly not telling you what to do. It's more that personally I got a lot out of doing the performance upgrades after I'd been in the saddle a while, and I'd be remiss not to share that.
 
Sorry you don't have some better roads out there! A friend of mine owns a Tuono out there and now I'm understanding why he has so many tickets. According to him, it's not technically illegal to run from the police--if they catch you, you just get ticketed for the other offenses you commit during the chase but not the chase itself. (I don't know that it's true, but I suspect he's tested this theory...)

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Zephyr
Ah, got it. Yeah, if the MEs I knew in college were college were inclined to ride I could see them being as thorough as you from the outset. ;-) 
For some people modding the hell out of a bike is half the fun of having one at all, and I respect that. But I also think there's something cool to starting out with a capable but near-stock bike, getting a couple thousand miles out of it, and then doing performance mods on it. Because then you'll be able to really get the difference and appreciate it more. And if your experience is anything like mine, when you first start out you don't miss what you've never had.
 
My first bike was a bone stock Ninja 650. I would have loved to put a pipe on it (stock sounded like a cross between a helicopter and a consistent fart). And I would ALWAYS recommend frame sliders for newbs, as the infamous Low Speed Drop is a near-universal experience. And cosmetic mods are fine, in my book. But unlike you I didn't know squat about suspension adjustments, braided lines, ECU flashes, or even good rubber. And still I took that thing to the canyons every weekend, usually twice a weekend, for three months straight. Was I hauling ass? No, I was a newb and guys blew by me regularly. But I also didn't know what feeling planted in a corner actually felt like, so I was also fearless--because I didn't know what I didn't know.
 
So ten months and 8k miles later, when I got a better bike it was the best thing to me since sliced bread. I could barely believe the difference. So I think being able to really utilize and appreciate the upgrades is what some people miss out on when they start on really well-sorted bikes.
 
I'm just offering my opinion so do take it FWIW. I'm certainly not telling you what to do. It's more that personally I got a lot out of doing the performance upgrades after I'd been in the saddle a while, and I'd be remiss not to share that.
 
Sorry you don't have some better roads out there! A friend of mine owns a Tuono out there and now I'm understanding why he has so many tickets. According to him, it's not technically illegal to run from the police--if they catch you, you just get ticketed for the other offenses you commit during the chase but not the chase itself. (I don't know that it's true, but I suspect he's tested this theory...)
 
Yeah.  If you'll notice the mod items that I purchased are practical mods that do not affect performance.  I will probably put at least 3k miles on it before any performance mods unless I am feeling a deficiency in some area.  As for your friend....  Running is probably against the law (and imho not a good idea), but the law states that police are not allowed to pursue as that would put other motorists and pedestrians in danger.  At least that is the way it was explained to me over here on the Big Island...  Other islands may be different.  The biggest issue over here is the lack of good roads and the speed limit does not exceed 55 anywhere.  Also if you get off the tarmac then you are usually in some pretty nasty lava rock (like broken glass) or in some cases steep drop offs.
 

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rick

Was in Maui for week (not nearly long enough) in October. Saw lots of flip-flop/helmet-less ridden scooters and not many bikes that weren't 20-30 year old Harleys. Think if I lived there (and I'm truly jealous), my riding gear would get traded for scuba stuff.
 
Oh yeah, you couldn't spit w/o hitting a rag-top Mustang

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Zephyr

Tried to start a Member's Gallery to have a bike build progression timeline, but I can't seem to get that to work, so I will post and update in this thread. The bike is set to arrive next week and be available for pick up on Friday Feb 3. I will be installing some "bolt-on" items prior to riding the bike, so it will never be ridden stock....
 
Stock Bike: 2016 FZ-07 Armor Gray
 
Current Mods:
 
Vagabond Frame Sliders
https://www.vagabondmotorsports.com/collections/yamaha-fz-07-2015/products/yamaha-fz-07-2015-frame-sliders
 
Dart Flyscreen
http://www.dartflyscreens.com/products/yamaha-fz07-mt07
 
Radiator Guard
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Yamaha-MT-07-Radiator-Guard-FZ-07-Rad-Cover-2014-2015-2016-2017-Stainless-Steel-/252723625156?
 
SW-Motech Pillion Seat Rack - Converted to mount Shad Top Case
http://www.twistedthrottle.com/sw-motech-seat-rack-for-yamaha-fz-07-14-16
 
SW-Motech Centerstand
http://www.twistedthrottle.com/sw-motech-centerstand-for-yamaha-fz-07-14-16
 
Shad 40 Top Case
http://www.twistedthrottle.com/shad-sh-40-cargo-top-case-matte-black-finish
 
Cyclops H4 7000 Lumen Led Headlight module
https://www.cyclopsadventuresports.com/7000-Lumen-H4-LED-Headlight-Bulb_p_169.html
 
 
Future Mods:
2WDW Flash (Purchased gift certificate for future upgrade)
 
Marine Grade 12V "lighter plug" with voltmeter to be wired directly to battery with switch to turn on/off as needed for items that require more than the 2A that the AUX DC will provide.  Mounting location on bike undetermined at this time.  Adding this specifically for a 12V DC tire inflator that I plan on keeping in my "road side" kit.
 
Marine Grade USB outlet wired to 2A Aux connection.  Mounted to Handlebars.
 
RAM Phone mount
 
Exhaust Upgrade - Undetermined at this time.
 
Brake Pad upgrade - Probably the EBC - HH Series, though that may change.
 
Suspension upgrade - Undetermined at this time.
 
Front and Rear turn signal upgrade - LED conversion, type undetermined.
 
Rim Tape - Undetermined
 
Horn Upgrade - Denali Soundbomb Mini
 
Additional lighting - I like the rear under cowl and front air scoop turn signal mods, so will be looking into that.  Maybe a fender eliminator, but am weary of the rain issues since I expect to be riding in some form of rain many (50-100) days out of the year.
 
 
Current "Road Side kit":
Rain Suit
https://www.revzilla.com/product/nelson-rigg-sr-6000-stormrider-rain-suit
 
Tire Repair Kit
https://www.revzilla.com/product/stop-go-tubeless-tire-shop-repair-kit
 
Tire Inflator
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000ET9SB4/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 
Digital Tire Guage
https://www.amazon.com/Slime-20017-Digital-Gauge-Lighted/dp/B000ET5264/ref=sr_1_8?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1485233761&sr=1-8&keywords=digital+tire+gauge
 
Mini Flashlight
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01BV63GCK/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 
 
Current Riding Gear:
Helmet - Shoei RF-1200 Parameter Hi Viz
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/shoei-rf-1200-parameter-helmet
 
Jacket - Rukka AiRider w/ Back protector
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/rukka-airider-jacket
 
Pants - Klim K Fifty 1 Jeans (Drk Blue)
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/klim-k-fifty-1-jeans
 
Gloves - Alpinestars SMX-1 Air (Blk/HiViz)
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/alpinestars-smx-1-air-gloves
 
Shoes - TCX X-Street Waterproof
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/tcx-x-street-waterproof-shoes
 
Ear Protection - NoNoise Music Noise Filter
https://www.revzilla.com/motorcycle/nonoise-music-noise-filter-ear-protection
 
 
 
 

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jmacas87

Good looking list. Have fun and keep us posted ?..!

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Zephyr

Picked up the bike today, after what felt like an eternity of waiting. Bike checked out ok for the pre-check, though on of the steering clamp bolts was loose and had to be tightened. Such a pain, thought I was going to have to remove the instrument panel to get to it, but barely had enough room to sneak a wrench in and make tiny turns.
 
Brought along some goodies to bolt on after pre-checks had been done. Installed the frame sliders and radiator guard and also dropped the sw-motech / shad40 top case combo on in place of the pillion seat. I had planned on putting the Dart Manta windscreen on, but had been burning in the blazing heat for over an hour, so decided to fore-go the windscreen.
 
Let me say this... I thought that I understood the concept of the bike being a bit torquey, but was caught off-guard and almost dumped the bike when I first left the parking lot. Afterwards I was initially freaked, but soon got over that. I stopped down the road to get gas as the tank was almost empty on arrival, then traveled only a mile or so before stopping for some lunch with my ever so patient wife and infant daughter whom had been waiting for me while I squared away the bike. After a decent lunch and loads of water to re-hydrate, I "begged off" from going to Target to shop and instead hit the road out of town. A good decision; as it turned out that my wife got caught in traffic leaving town. Outside of town I soon cleared traffic and had a good stretch of open road ahead of me. I took advantage of the open road to get a better feel for the bike, specifically changing gears up and down and also practicing controlled firm braking technique to get acquainted with the weight transfer when under heavy braking and also to feel for that transfer so that I can apply firmer pressure for heavier braking.
After the long stretch of empty roads I was met with heavy and gusty winds coming around the south side of the island as I had expected. I almost regretted foregoing the windscreen, but a bit of tank hugging helped me get through what was mostly head winds with occasional side gusts. Another pit-stop shortly thereafter to check in wife the wife and then the last leg home. I was looking forward to the last leg as it had some curves! I enjoyed the curves a lot and the bike was so agile that I wanted to push the tempo a bit. I practiced self restraint and held off pushing the speed and instead focused on good "push/pull" technique through the corners with the inside hand... Push to set the bike for the curve, easy throttle on and a bit of a pull with the same inside hand to bike the bike upright. I was all smiles as I shifted hand to hand through the turns and grinned even more when I found myself leaned over further than expected only to flick the bike back upright at will. Sadly the curves melted away in short fashion and I signaled a left turn as my driveway came into view... Looking forward to getting her bike on the road soon. Supposed to be rain tomorrow, so I'll keep my eyes open for Wednesday.
 
Some things to take away from today's ride: Low speed practice is a must! I felt like I had "bambi legs" when going at low speeds. Practice proper shifting technique. I was at near max capacity with all of the information input, so I made small "mistakes" here and there like not rolling off the throttle completely when up-shifting resulting in a small lurch forward, also downshifts were a touch problematic as well since there is the combined engine breaking with the lower gear that would give a small lunge at times. I did not try to rev match this go around and tried to decel into the right gear before shifting. Lastly. Body position. I need to focus on more legs and less hands to maintain body position. The rearsets seemed a bit "tight" for my oversized US 13 shoes as I couldn't get a natural feel for where to place the foot to have confidence in the shift lever location and the rear brakes nearly did not exist for this first ride as I could never tell if I was on the brake lever or not.
 
Sigh... Lot's of work to do. On the upside I will be taking the MSF course starting this Friday, so there's that. And I'm thinking seriously about going ahead  with the 2WDW reflash sooner than later.  The fuel cut-out is a bit nonsensical. 
 
Well if you've read this far then you deserve a little eye candy... the bike as she sits right now:
 
 
 
 
Zephyr_FZ07.jpg
 
get url for photo
 

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hamster

Congrats!!!!!! And little by little, new slippery tires!!

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Safe riding!

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Zephyr

Got the wife's approval to slip out for a while to take the bike for a ride. I had adjusted the rear preload when I first got the bike and it was ok, but felt a bit harsh over bumps. Knocked it down 2 notches and felt much better over bumps, but a bit less stable in the turns. I think I'll go up one and see if it hits closer to a sweet spot for me. That test ride will have to wait as I plan on sending the ECU out on Monday for the 2WDW treatment. The fuel cut-out is driving me crazy.
 
A quick pic from today's ride:
 
 
FZ_07_Keauhou.jpg
 

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rick

Keep in mind, changing the spring preload is really only changing the height of the seat. You are neither changing the rate of the spring nor the damping of the POS shock. Way too much preload and you will overpower what little damping the thing does have
 
You need to check sag measurements - and adjust preload to get those numbers in the right ballpark. Ultimately, that's gonna depend on your weight. The real fix is a real shock.
 
1st time I slammed the throttle shut in 3rd gear on the way home from picking mine up, I slid forward and dang near kissed the clocks. The fuel cut-off takes a lot of getting used to imo. It would be the one and only thing I'd change to the FI. You'll not regret having that done.

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