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armydude52c

Jerky shifting

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armydude52c
Sorry if this question has been asked before but seems like either I'm rolling off the throttle too much or shifting to fast but between gears bike wants to jerk. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I'm pretty sure it's just my technique. Bike only has 34 miles on it so far. Do you completely roll off the throttle shift then roll back on or?
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norcal616
In general barely left off throttle...and the amount I pull my clutch in very little but the way i ride is not the same as you...so the solution is with more seat time i believe you will learn to get smoother with shifting and what not...it's just when you get a new car or truck, you learn the same thing how hard to hit the brakes for example...I also wanna point out there is reading material, videos, and classes on a wide range of motorcycle techniques, which I'm sure others may chime in on...

2015 fz-07- Hordpower Edition...2015 fj-09- 120whp- Graves Exhaust w/Woolich Race Kit- tuned by 2WDW
 

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Eastern Kayaker
You may need to work on your shifting technique and/or make some adjustments to your bike. Check out the "How to adjust the throttle cable" thread under "tech tips" to see if your throttle cable needs adjusting. Also, most riders need to adjust the shift pedal height to fit their foot. My bike was purchased new and had too much slack in the throttle cable. The shift pedal height was too low for me, so I raised it a little to make shifting more comfortable. 

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rewplayff
I think the shifting in this bike is pretty abrupt/solid. Not necessarily jerky, Does the bike actually jump a bit when you shift? or you catch a bit of engine break between? just curious.

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armydude52c
Feels like engine braking. Starts when I roll off to shift then when I roll on in jumps a Lil

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vroomvroom
Feels like engine braking. Starts when I roll off to shift then when I roll on in jumps a Lil
 
 
The FZ has notorious engine breaking... to the point that many people are getting ECU reflashes to combat it
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yamahazaki
I get an abrupt jerk occasionally when I do some bad shifting technique after I have ridden my other smoother throttled bikes around for a bit. After several hundred miles you will probably smooth yourself out after you adapt to the bike.

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Beemer
I don't know exactly how you're shifting but I'm pretty sure it's just your technique. It could be from different things but from what you've described it sounds like you're not giving it any gas (or not enough) when you release the clutch lever. It's a common noob mistake so just practice giving it some gas (match the revs) right when the clutch is released so that the bike doesn't nose dive when you release the clutch. 
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Beemer

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armydude52c
Thanks for the advice everyone. Put 100 miles on today my shifting if definitely improving. Still trying to master it but it's getting better
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tbi12904
My bike was very jerky when it was new, too. It improved over time, as I put more and more mileage on it.
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Beemer
I'm sure your shifting has improved by now but just in case it isn't to where it should be, have you watched any videos on shifting? If you haven't here's a decent one. 
 
 
[video src=https://youtu.be/Z9XCCDQOgyQ]
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Beemer

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x3rolink
I almost exclusively do clutch-less upshifts when accelerating. I find this to be THE smoothest shifting when you want to constantly accelerate and have none of that pause that takes place when you pull in the clutch.
 
The only time I do shift with the clutch is either when I am not accelerating hard or going relatively slow
 
I would recommend you to watch vids on clutch-less upshifts, but that's just me.

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Beemer
I almost exclusively do clutch-less upshifts when accelerating. I find this to be THE smoothest shifting when you want to constantly accelerate and have none of that pause that takes place when you pull in the clutch. 
The only time I do shift with the clutch is either when I am not accelerating hard or going relatively slow
 
I would recommend you to watch vids on clutch-less upshifts, but that's just me.
I agree it can be smoother shifting but you have to learn to do that right as well. Shouldn't a noob's time be spent learning how to clutch well before moving on to the more advanced clutch-less shifting? I think so. 
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Beemer

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Beemer
Just one other thing I would like to add about this bike, it's not like most other bikes that people learn to ride on. Some people say this is a good beginners bike and it is for certain reasons but it's not for the reason it's a hyper naked that has (unlike most beginners bikes) high compression pistons and low gearing and a very good power to weight ratio. This bike is made to be punchy and very quick in short distances so be very careful with this bike. One mistake and this bike can run away from you in a blink so throttle/clutch control is extra important on this bike.
 
Look at this bike as you would a wild horse wanting to buck you off and never get too relaxed on it. ;)
 
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Beemer

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r1limited
Just one other thing I would like to add about this bike, it's not like most other bikes that people learn to ride on. Some people say this is a good beginners bike and it is for certain reasons but it's not for the reason it's a hyper naked that has (unlike most beginners bikes) high compression pistons and low gearing and a very good power to weight ratio. This bike is made to be punchy and very quick in short distances so be very careful with this bike. One mistake and this bike can run away from you in a blink so throttle/clutch control is extra important on this bike. 
Look at this bike as you would a wild horse wanting to buck you off and never get too relaxed on it. ;)

^^^ That in itself is some very good insight on the FZ.  Yamaha tried to create a bike that would appease and cater to novice riders on up.  I use novice as this would be a good jump bike from someone off a 250 like a ninja or the R3.  I have not ridden the CBR500 so I cannot comment on that but its a honda and honda sucks just because of Dani Padreosa and that other midget [HASH]95 guy :) 
I am going to add no matter what experiance you have, no matter how many years or first time bike ALWAYS RESPECT THE BIKE, never fear it and have confidence in your ability or lack of it.  Saddle time is the best teacher. What I always recommend for the New rider is this, get a 125 or 250 dirt bike and beat the hell out of it for at minimum 1 year in mud, sleet, rain and snow... You will thank me later .
 
For the shifting itself, first off my clutch was so far out of adjustment it was not pretty and made ofr a horrid ride.  Second the Shift lever should fit loosing on top of your boot and you should not strain to shift or worry where it is, should be nutral in your feel sitting on the seat feet on the pegs.  Third that damn ECU has a big at low Rs causing the feel of a crappy shift all this makes one feel uncertain if your doing it right or the bikes shifting sucks.  It dont suck.  Techniuque becomes muscle memory as you learn the bikes power band when to shit when to down shift etc.  The bike is so thumpy leaving it in 3rd in city traffic is normal for me, just clutch and rolling the throttle and keeping the Rs at a point the bike is smooth.
 
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“Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.” --Thomas Jefferson quoting Cesare Beccaria

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daviziko
I almost exclusively do clutch-less upshifts when accelerating. I find this to be THE smoothest shifting when you want to constantly accelerate and have none of that pause that takes place when you pull in the clutch. 
The only time I do shift with the clutch is either when I am not accelerating hard or going relatively slow
 
I would recommend you to watch vids on clutch-less upshifts, but that's just me.
I agree with this... I find my gearbox to be clunky, so I do clutch-less upshitfting and downshifting. 

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Beemer
I misunderstood you the first time, sorry. I sounds to me like you're letting off the throttle before you pull the clutch in enough to disengage. The bike will engine brake between shifts doing it that way. It's just about your timing, it will come. When you let the clutch out do it quick and smooth, don't pop it and don't give it too much throttle or yes, it will jump. Maybe practice a half hour a day in a parking lot until it comes to you.

Beemer

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roosterxp
I was the same way about the shifting.. I drive semi Trucks for a living and when you shift between gears there is a pause so the RPMS can go down to catch the next gear.. well it took my brain about 100 miles to reprogram and shift faster.. 2 cylinder motorcycle engines rev just a tick faster than a diesel semi... haha
long story short I have learned that these bikes like to be shifted quick..not necessarily accelerating as fast as it can, about as fast as you can grab the cluch, foot shift, then release the clutch..

2017 Yamaha FZ07 Black on Black. Akrapovic Carbon, 2WDW tune. Punisher Rad guard. National Cycle windscreen,

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phyciocc
Smooth shifting is a dance with three "feet" (well, two hands and a foot :) ).
 
Pull the clutch, roll off the throttle just enough to match the rev to the new (higher) gear, shift, release the clutch.
 
Downshifting: the same, but this time don't roll off the throttle but "blip it", to increase the rev for the lower gear.
 
Practice practice practice...
 
Marco
 
I am a crazy Physics Prof. Beware :o:)

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r1limited
Smooth shifting is a dance with three "feet" (well, two hands and a foot :) ).  
Pull the clutch, roll off the throttle just enough to match the rev to the new (higher) gear, shift, release the clutch.
 
Downshifting: the same, but this time don't roll off the throttle but "blip it", to increase the rev for the lower gear.
 
Practice practice practice...
 
Marco
 
I am a crazy Physics Prof. Beware :o:)
So pulling in the clutch lever revin it till it hits the rev limiter, shovin it into 1st and dumping the clutch is wrong? 
Damn I need to tell the ex girlfriend I was wrong
 
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“Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.” --Thomas Jefferson quoting Cesare Beccaria

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faffi
:D
 
In my experience, the MT-07 shifts smoothly and silently if shifts are made really, really quick. Once you take a moment, the shifts are noisy and hard to make smooth. Or maybe it's just because it leaves enough time for the engine to hit the limiter ;)

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cyow5
On 6/18/2017 at 8:35 AM, roosterxp said:

I was the same way about the shifting.. I drive semi Trucks for a living and when you shift between gears there is a pause so the RPMS can go down to catch the next gear.. well it took my brain about 100 miles to reprogram and shift faster.. 2 cylinder motorcycle engines rev just a tick faster than a diesel semi... haha
long story short I have learned that these bikes like to be shifted quick..not necessarily accelerating as fast as it can, about as fast as you can grab the cluch, foot shift, then release the clutch..

My daily driver, Pontiac G5, feels like it has a lead flywheel + super laggy electronic throttle, so it is similar to your truck. You just have to wait for the revs to fall or it bucks like crazy. The Elise responds so much quicker, I got used to the dichotomy and that made the learning curve much less steep on the FZ. I find clutchless upshifts to be all around easier and smoother though; not sure why it isn't the primary way of doing it. It's even less for a noob to coordinate together.  

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r1limited

Just keep it in 1st and clutch it

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“Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.” --Thomas Jefferson quoting Cesare Beccaria

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jmacas87

does anyone else notice that the FZ has a bit notchier transmission than most. I wouldn't call it rough or anything, but out of my 4 other bikes this definitely is the clunkier feeling of them all. It isn't a con by any means, just noticeable enough. 

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michigan400

Notchy is exactly what I call it as well. Shifts fine and I've only missed a gear once or twice mainly because I just wasn't paying much attention to what I was doing. But it does feel notchy and takes just a bit more effort for a good positive shift. The gap between 3rd and 4th is a little wide compared to the others and that's where I've missed a shift. 

 

But it did get slightly better after the first oil change. I'm switching to full synth next time and hopefully that will smooth it out a little more.

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