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keeninja

2WheelDynoWorks Reflash Early Impressions

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keeninja
Right off the bat, Nels and Pat @2wheeldynoworks were super responsive and great to work with! They had a lot of solid advice when I emailed them about an ECU reflash for my 2016 with an M4 slip-on exhaust. After I chatted with them about options, I decided to remove the rubber snorkel from my air intake, but leave the stock box cover on there. I'll also be switching to a K&N filter once the OEM filter is ready to be replaced, but I'm told that won't actually make much of a difference power-wise and won't need another reflash.
 
Just my luck that a storm came through on the weekend my ECU got to their shop and they had no power. They expressed 100% confidence in their secure lockbox and everything was fine, so that's a big plus for making sure our ECUs are safe even when they can't get to the shop.
 
They gave me a call the morning they were back in the shop to confirm the aftermarket setup on my bike and make sure they were putting the right tune on the ECU, and sent it off later that day.
 
As for the performance of the tune, I can really just echo what a lot of satisfied customers have already noted: it is a HUGE improvement! The throttle and power delivery are super smooth. I had noticed a couple of dead patches in 4th and 5th gear where it felt like the engine would just stop delivering adequate power and I'd get no acceleration, but that issues seems to have been resolved. The severe engine braking is also greatly improved. I'm looking forward to feeling out more of the changes in the long term. A couple other things I noticed are that the bike seems to be running a lot richer. I can definitely smell the fuel now as soon as I fire the bike up, but it's not super overpowering or anything. I've been running 89 octane and am wondering if I could drop down to 87 or if that's actually what things should actually smell like. Also, the initial revs are higher right after startup than they were before the tune (they're now just a tic below 2000rpm, but once I start riding, the idling at stop lights and stuff goes back down to normal. Seems like I might just need to give it a little extra warmup time, but that it's not a problem either way since the revs do go back down.
 
Overall I am super stoked on this ECU reflash and am really glad I went with the pros over at 2WheelDynoWorks!
 
 
 
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2wheeldynoworks
Thanks for the review, we really appreciate it!

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Guest ChicagoAJ
I really hope your bike isn't idling at 2,000rpms.

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keeninja
I really hope your bike isn't idling at 2,000rpms.
 
 
Only right at startup, like I said. After the first few minutes of riding and/or blipping the throttle a few times, the idling revs go back down to normal... I can try to get a video of what I'm taking about if this sounds like something I should be more worried about.

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crsnhppr
I think that's just your engine warming up

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keeninja
I think that's just your engine warming up
 
 
Yeah, I figure as much. It's just a change from before the flash that seemed worth mentioning.

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rick
I think that's just your engine warming up
Yeah, I figure as much. It's just a change from before the flash that seemed worth mentioning.
Once upon a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth and motor vehicles had carburetors, the choke mechanism which needed to be closed at start-up (not to be confused with enriching circuits in CV carbs) also had a stepped cam that held the throttle open a touch until the motor heated up and the choke opened via a thermostatic spring. At a cold start, 1st thing ya did before touching the key was to step down on the gas pedal a wee bit to allow the choke to close and put that "fast idle cam" under the throttle stop screw. 
FI systems recognize engine temp and ambient temp and then adjust stuff  (injectors, idle air control valve etc.) to give you that same fast idle. You may even find that as it gets colder outside, that initial idle speed will be even higher. It might even just be because it's colder out now. 
 
 Think my Aprilia jumps up into the mid-2ks when the temps are in the 30s. It's all very normal.

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Guest 2wheeler
Once upon a time when dinosaurs roamed the earth and motor vehicles had carburetors, the choke mechanism which needed to be closed at start-up (not to be confused with enriching circuits in CV carbs) also had a stepped cam that held the throttle open a touch until the motor heated up and the choke opened via a thermostatic spring. At a cold start, 1st thing ya did before touching the key was to step down on the gas pedal a wee bit to allow the choke to close and put that "fast idle cam" under the throttle stop screw.
Wow, you are old - LMAO! 
... or like I prefer to say these days - older
 
My first car was a 1972 Chevy Malibu and my first real motorcycle was a 1972 Yamaha 100 Enduro - the joy of carbs and chokes. Having said that, I recently bought a 1979 Yamaha IT175 so I am back in the world of manual chokes 8-)
 
 
 

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rick
Hee, hee, let me just say that 1976 R90/6 BMW (aka "the brown stain" ) in my Avatar was my 3rd motorcycle. A 1972 Honda CB500-4 was number 2.
 
I've a friend with a 2006 (wtf, 2006 and still not FI)) Ninja 250 that I nurse thru life. Every time i start that thing from ambient temps i have to remember to throw dang joke lever.
 
 

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robborboy
I think that's just your engine warming up
Yeah, I figure as much. It's just a change from before the flash that seemed worth mentioning.
Okay I need to check something. About how cold do you normally ride in? Any any average less that 70 degree day my engine does jump up to just shy of 2k RPM during warm up. Length it stays there depends on l how coll it is. Say 10f takes longer to drop to normal idle than 70f.

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Guest ChicagoAJ
Hee, hee, let me just say that 1976 R90/6 BMW (aka "the brown stain" ) in my Avatar was my 3rd motorcycle. A 1972 Honda CB500-4 was number 2.  
I've a friend with a 2006 (wtf, 2006 and still not FI)) Ninja 250 that I nurse thru life. Every time i start that thing from ambient temps i have to remember to throw dang joke lever.
 

I think the Ninjette 250s are carbed up until 2009, if I'm not mistaken. 

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reboot
Hee, hee, let me just say that 1976 R90/6 BMW (aka "the brown stain" ) in my Avatar was my 3rd motorcycle. A 1972 Honda CB500-4 was number 2.  
I've a friend with a 2006 (wtf, 2006 and still not FI)) Ninja 250 that I nurse thru life. Every time i start that thing from ambient temps i have to remember to throw dang joke lever.
 

I think the Ninjette 250s are carbed up until 2009, if I'm not mistaken. 
I think the US market ninja's are still carbed. I know my 2009 was but a JAP based 2009 had FI. I think it is still the same...

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robborboy
I think the Ninjette 250s are carbed up until 2009, if I'm not mistaken. 
I think the US market ninja's are still carbed. I know my 2009 was but a JAP based 2009 had FI. I think it is still the same...
Thats correct. Thw Ninja 250 never got EFI in the States. It wasnt until they put out the 300 that there was a small displacement EFI Kawasaki bike.

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