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CarGuy7a

Clutch Switch/Aftermarket Clutch Perch & Lever

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CarGuy7a
So in search of a lighter clutch pull I ordered an RSC clutch to install on my 16 FZ-07. I realized it did not offer any mounts or tabs to operate the clutch switch and I figured I could just jump the two wires and call it good. Nope, not the case on these newer FI bikes as I found out the hard way. Jumping the clutch wires on the FZ-07 disables the Eco mode and puts the bike into a neutral idle fuel map and tells the ECU that the clutch is disengaged the whole time while you're riding (and it doesn't run very optimal this way, noticeable power loss). I found this out with some internet search and scrounging through the service manual to find out where those pesky clutch switch wires go. Once I found out that one of the wires goes directly to the ECU I knew something had to be up with this. Did a little more searching and found out guys were using a momentary on switch (like a kill switch for a dirt bike) to hook the clutch switch wires to so you can start the bike in gear while pulling the clutch in holding the button then hitting the starter.
 
So today I installed a momentary on button and tested all connections and made sure it works. It definitely works but there is another catch to this. Idle RPM. I noticed that when in 1st gear with the clutch pulled in, switch open, the idle is higher. As soon as I press the button to close the switch, the idle drops. Not much only a couple hundred RPM's difference. I'm talking maybe 1,300rpm to like 1,600 or so but it's enough to hear it. Same thing if I do not touch the switch and shift the trans into N, idle drops. Normally the switch continuity is open when cruising and clutch is engaged so this idle difference is not noticed because obviously you aren't idling when the clutch is engaged.
 
Now my question is. Is this going to hurt anything? Does the ECU do anything different every time you shift into a different gear? Or is there just 2 maps, idle and throttle on? I'm going to test ride it tomorrow and see if everything functions as it should, but if someone has more insight as to what is going on please let me know. Thanks
 
Mods are
K&N air filter with modded snorkel
Akra full Ti exhaust
PCV
 

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CarGuy7a
Took a test ride on it today and all systems seem normal. Eco Mode indicator is working again and power feels like it should. The only thing I noticed is Eco Mode stays on a little longer due to the switch not telling it to turn off while down shifting. I did not notice any lean popping on decel. If I roll on the throttle hard Eco Mode turns off like normal. Seems like this is the way to go when adding an aftermarket clutch and perch that doesn't accommodate mounting the clutch switch.
 
Eco mode does not come on at idle whether the switch is open or close (which is good). The higher idle while in gear I guess I can live with as I said before it's not much higher only a couple hundred RPM.
 

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Guest Ralph
Among other things the switch acts like a anti stall switch to waken the fueling up as you pull in
the clutch from a closed throttle on the overrun, it also retards the timing by a few degrees and
that is likely why you see the drop in revs.

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cybmx
I had an aftermarket clutch for more than a year now, I just simply leave the switch unplugged. No issues so far. The ecu simply reads that the clutch is fully engaged all the time.
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AlbatrossCafe
I had an aftermarket clutch for more than a year now, I just simply leave the switch unplugged. No issues so far. The ecu simply reads that the clutch is fully engaged all the time.
So can you turn it over in gear without pulling the clutch in? (e.g. will bike lurch forward with the starter motor)? 

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rick
I had an aftermarket clutch for more than a year now, I just simply leave the switch unplugged. No issues so far. The ecu simply reads that the clutch is fully engaged all the time.
So can you turn it over in gear without pulling the clutch in? (e.g. will bike lurch forward with the starter motor)?
and that can be quite fun - especially if the bike weighs 630 lbs - Doh! 

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rick
Sounds like theECU is compensate for a bit of drag in the clutch plates and gearbox - sorta like a car's idle speed being adjusted up a bit when the AC is turned on.
 
Can this new lever be drilled and tapped so that a small screw can be installed to activate that switch?

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cybmx
I had an aftermarket clutch for more than a year now, I just simply leave the switch unplugged. No issues so far. The ecu simply reads that the clutch is fully engaged all the time.
So can you turn it over in gear without pulling the clutch in? (e.g. will bike lurch forward with the starter motor)?
 
No you can't. I never start my bike in gears anyway, always in neutral.

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CarGuy7a
Sounds like theECU is compensate for a bit of drag in the clutch plates and gearbox - sorta like a car's idle speed being adjusted up a bit when the AC is turned on.  
Can this new lever be drilled and tapped so that a small screw can be installed to activate that switch?
Well in the stock setup, when you pull the clutch to the bars, the switch closes (makes continuity) when the plunger extends. This makes the ECU go into the "Neutral Map" causing the RPM's to drop to normal idle as if the trans is in N. When you let the clutch out, the switch opens telling the ECU to go into another map. Now when the trans is in N, I've discovered that the clutch switch does nothing to the idle whether closed or open. In gear it's a different story. The switch I added is completely reverse to the stock switch. The switch I added is a normally open switch just like a dirt bike kill button because I want it to be open while riding, but be able to push the button so the starter will activate while in gear. Just in case I get in a sticky situation I need to get out of on the road. I thought about just leaving it unplugged but that looming threat of a stall at a red light with a car barreling down on me doing 50mph while I'm trying to find N to re start didn't appeal to me. 
The new lever and perch is much too small to be able to mount the stock clutch switch. Not enough real estate. I wish I could have done something like that though. Would have been a much better route.
 
The prices we pay for modification. >:D
 
Here's the clutch I put on. I bought the full length which is enough for 2 fingers, 3 if you choke up on it but seriously I can pull that thing in with 1 finger and hold it all day it's that easy. Righteous Stunt Clutch
 
 
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Guest Ralph
Maybe you could fit a switch at the engine end maybe one intended for a bike with a cable front
brake to fit a brake light.

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rick
Ah, different maps - that quest for fuel efficiency (and really lean), even at idle.
 
U didn't just replace the lever like most do - you replaced that entire assembly!
 
Considering how often some of these motors have stalled for no reason, it's always good to be able to hit that starter w/o fumbling for neutral.
 
Hmm, mine did not stall once all summer. What, the plugs have to get a little dirty before it stops stalling at red lights.

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AlbatrossCafe
Ah, different maps - that quest for fuel efficiency (and really lean), even at idle.  
Considering how often some of these motors have stalled for no reason, it's always good to be able to hit that starter w/o fumbling for neutral.
 
 

In the "quest for fuel efficiency" I usually turn my bike off at lights when I know it is going to be a 30+ second wait. 
Am I missing something here? Why does he have to go to neutral to start it? You should be able to start your bike in any gear as long as the kickstand is up. Is it because his switch is reversed?
 

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CarGuy7a
Yeah the I added the whole assembly. RSC doesn't sell just a lever. The ratio of pull on the cable is completely different than stock (that's how they get the easier pull) and some of that ratio comes from the perch and how far away from the bar it is.
 
CYBMX stated that he unplugged and removed the clutch switch entirely and left the plug with nothing hooked to it, hence why he has to start it in neutral. The contact in the clutch switch has to be made to be able to start the bike in gear with the clutch pulled to the bars.
 
Mine on the other hand is normally open unless I push the button which makes the contact so I can start the bike in gear with the clutch pulled in. Then I can let off the button after starting it to put the ECU into the map it should be in while riding.

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rick
Did a little reading on the FZ 9 forum and it seems there are some guys (and shops) bypassing that clutch switch and claiming the bike runs smoother. Apparently, because it's running a "Neutral" gear map, it's also not fueling properly when there is demand.
 
So where did you put this momentary switch such that you can pull the clutch lever, push that switch and hit the starter with the other hand? Lots of left handed dexterity!

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CarGuy7a
It's a little bit of a stretch but it works out ok. I won't use it all the time. I normally start it in neutral except for if I need to start it fast after a stall (which I've not had a stall on it yet thankfully). I made a bracket out of aluminum flat stock and drilled a hole so it would mount in the bottom clutch perch bolt. It's not much further in on the bars than the turn signal button.
 
It may run a little smoother on the 09's due to the extra cylinder but on the 07's, I noticed a definite power loss and it also had a little burble every once in a while at constant throttle. Not really as harsh as a misfire but enough burble to hear, especially with my loud arse akra pipe on it.
 

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rick
Got a lot of practice relearning where the starter " button" for this bike is - in needy situations. Old habits can be hard to break, lol. Mine stalled way too many times in the 1st year to the point that it was on my mind at every traffic light with a car behind me. Been so long now, that if it were to happen, it would be my fault and not the bike.

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CarGuy7a
Got a lot of practice relearning where the starter " button" for this bike is - in needy situations. Old habits can be hard to break, lol. Mine stalled way too many times in the 1st year to the point that it was on my mind at every traffic light with a car behind me. Been so long now, that if it were to happen, it would be my fault and not the bike.
I know how that is, re learning stuff. I hop on my CRF450R supermoto, and look for the start button and then remember, I have to kick this bike lol. 

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rick
Pretty funny - I sorta remember kick starters. Last one I owned preceded the '76 R90 in my avatar.
 
Horn buttons and turn signals can be a challenge when switching bikes, lol.
 
All good for the brain.

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Guest Ralph
Many of the old bikes I have had could kick back hard enough to break a leg,
at least with a electric starter it will only break your thumb.
;);)
 

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CarGuy7a
Many of the old bikes I have had could kick back hard enough to break a leg, at least with a electric starter it will only break your thumb.
;);)

I'm lucky I never had to experience that hard kick back. The old CR500 2 smokes were bad for that. My dad's cousin had one and my dad tried to kick it one time and said screw this I don't need a broke foot today. On the other hand though (or foot maybe lol), my 450 kicks over like a 50cc with the auto decomp. 

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emmerich
Hey I know this thread is pretty old at this point but I had a quick question.
 
Did you use a spacer when you installed your RSC lever?  
 
 
I just installed mine and the clutch will not fully disengage no matter how I adjust the cable (evident by trying to push the bike in gear with the lever fully pulled).  I've tried both the lever side adjuster and down near the clutch itself.  It's just as if there's not enough travel in the lever to fully disengage the plates.
 
I'm hoping a spacer would be able to fix this; allowing the lever to be pulled further.

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