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ccam7374

Exhaust leak

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ccam7374
So I put on my M4 exhaust and tightened the clamps as tight as I could get them. I still have a bit of a leak. Should I try to tighten them more with better leverage?

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avanti
NO!!! Get new gaskets (assuming it uses them) and then TORQUE all relevant fasteners to specs--no more, no less. Tighter is NOT always better. If you don't have a torque-wrench AND you work on anything, get one! All the best.
 
What you are suggesting is simply a good way to break/strip/destroy things!
 

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USMCFieldMP
I'm skeptical as to whether or not there truly is a torque spec in this case. Isn't the M4 the one where you saw your stock exhaust apart and then slip on the M4? That's largely the problem; it's an inexact system.
 
But as he mentioned, tighter doesn't necessarily equate to a proper seal. You need to figure out where and why it is leaking. I don't know they system that well either, but I imagine using some exhaust gasket maker at the connection would probably help to seal those tiny holes.
 
https://www.amazon.com/Permatex-81878-Maximum-Temperature-Silicone/dp/B0002UEOPA
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aaron
I had the same thing when I did my M4. I am assuming you mean that you have a leak where you cut the exhaust and the new pipe connects, right? As mentioned above get some high temperature silicone and apply generously. Then crank it down tightly. The leak should go away. Worked for me.
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ccam7374
NO!!! Get new gaskets (assuming it uses them) and then TORQUE all relevant fasteners to specs--no more, no less. Tighter is NOT always better. If you don't have a torque-wrench AND you work on anything, get one! All the best. 
What you are suggesting is simply a good way to break/strip/destroy things!

 
 
 
 
No I am talking about where the cut end and the new exhaust meet. I did not overtighten the bolts to the head.

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avanti
Good! But, you do NOT want to over-tighten anything. I don't know what you are tightening apart from the description here, but from that "picture" of the system it sounds like it is probably some sort to rather typical stainless band-clamp you are dealing with. That being so, I agree with what others have suggested above. However, I would add that it would be a good idea while you have the "joint" back apart and before applying sealer, carefully inspect all surfaces that contact each other and notice any rough edges or damaged areas that could be a possible problem when you reassemble.  Not knowing what you used to cut the pipe, it may be that you had a burr on an edge that precluded a tight seal the first attempt.
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Guest ChicagoAJ
NO!!! Get new gaskets (assuming it uses them) and then TORQUE all relevant fasteners to specs--no more, no less. Tighter is NOT always better. If you don't have a torque-wrench AND you work on anything, get one! All the best. 
What you are suggesting is simply a good way to break/strip/destroy things!

 
 
No I am talking about where the cut end and the new exhaust meet. I did not overtighten the bolts to the head.
Any slip together joints are like 99.9% prone to leakage. You'll be hard-pressed to find a slip together system that doesn't leak a tiny bit, the only sure-fire way to seal it would be to weld the seams. My Akra Carbon leaks at almost every joint but they're slowly filling up with carbon and should seal themselves eventually. You should be able to expect the same outcome after a few thousand miles.  
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ccam7374
Should I put a bit more of the permatex high temp copper gasket maker on it. Say just around the tip where the joint is?

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Guest ChicagoAJ
Should I put a bit more of the permatex high temp copper gasket maker on it. Say just around the tip where the joint is?
How bad is it leaking? If it's just a tiny bit of carbon buildup at the seams I wouldn't worry about it. If you really want to make sure it's airtight, I would take the whole can off and put a bead of the high-temp sealer on the outside of the collector pipes and inside the can.  
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marthy
Good! But, you do NOT want to over-tighten anything. I don't know what you are tightening apart from the description here, but from that "picture" of the system it sounds like it is probably some sort to rather typical stainless band-clamp you are dealing with. That being so, I agree with what others have suggested above. However, I would add that it would be a good idea while you have the "joint" back apart and before applying sealer, carefully inspect all surfaces that contact each other and notice any rough edges or damaged areas that could be a possible problem when you reassemble.  Not knowing what you used to cut the pipe, it may be that you had a burr on an edge that precluded a tight seal the first attempt.
Just butter her up with hi-temp silicone and plug it back together. I did it on my ride and it stopped the leak at the collector.
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ccam7374
Well I put some more high temp sealer and that seemed to help out alot.
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