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squiernut

Chain adjusters w/spool

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squiernut
Anyone tried these out?  
I'm certain they've been mentioned here before, but a search didn't quickly reveal anything.
 
 
http://www.aliexpress.com/item/CNC-Aluminum-Chain-Adjusters-with-Spools-Slider-For-Yamaha-MT-07-FZ-07-MT07-FZ07-2013/32693892841.html?spm=2114.01010208.3.42.KSMqds&ws_ab_test=searchweb201556_10,searchweb201602_5_10057_10056_10065_10055_10054_10067_10069_10059_10058_10017_10070_10060_10061_10052_10062_10053_10050_10051,searchweb201603_4&btsid=d8a41c20-ea92-4d0d-8e12-6e7e1023d0dd
 
I'm skeptical of cheap Chinese stuff, but the brake & clutch levers I bought are fine, so I thought I'd see if anyone has tried these out yet.   
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As God as my witness, I thought turkeys could fly.

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curt5787
I bought the same ones thru Ebay and love them!

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fzonly1
I bought the same ones thru Ebay and love them!
 
Take any pics during install? How difficult to install?

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jake
I bought the same ones thru Ebay and love them!
Take any pics during install? How difficult to install?
Its easy ...1 Support your back swing arm https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DO3AC1C/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 2 loosen up your chain by backing out your adjuster screws  and bumping your tire forward.
3 remove the wheel nut
4 slide the wheel pin out ( if you have something to keep the wheel in place it will help). Make sure your spacers and your brake caliper stay in place.
5 once the pin is out you can slide your old adjuster out and put the new ones in.
6 slide the pin back in and adjust your chain and torque your wheel nut.
 

2015 FZ-07 2003 2014 GSXR 1000

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Guest ChicagoAJ
Take any pics during install? How difficult to install?
Its easy ...1 Support your back swing arm https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DO3AC1C/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 2 loosen up your chain by backing out your adjuster screws  and bumping your tire forward.
3 remove the wheel nut
4 slide the wheel pin out ( if you have something to keep the wheel in place it will help). Make sure your spacers and your brake caliper stay in place.
5 once the pin is out you can slide your old adjuster out and put the new ones in.
6 slide the pin back in and adjust your chain and torque your wheel nut.

Pin = axle for anyone confused like I was for a second there.  
 
 
Anyone who has taken their back wheel off before, installing these should be a piece of cake. 
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versysrider
Are people just using these as a lift point for cleaning the rear wheel, or are they safe to use when removing the axle and rear wheel to change tires?
 
What do the 2 studs in the back of the new axle block screw into inside the swingarm, and are the holes already there, or do you have to drill and tap some holes?
 
Just want to know if I should get these, or get another swingarm stand that uses paddles.

'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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jmacas87
Are people just using these as a lift point for cleaning the rear wheel, or are they safe to use when removing the axle and rear wheel to change tires?  
What do the 2 studs in the back of the new axle block screw into inside the swingarm, and are the holes already there, or do you have to drill and tap some holes?
 
Just want to know if I should get these, or get another swingarm stand that uses paddles.
based on the photos, it looks like the two screws are used to "wedge" lock the adjusters in place. they don't actually screw into anything on the swingarm itself. 
 
 
 
 
 

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versysrider
Are people just using these as a lift point for cleaning the rear wheel, or are they safe to use when removing the axle and rear wheel to change tires?  
What do the 2 studs in the back of the new axle block screw into inside the swingarm, and are the holes already there, or do you have to drill and tap some holes?
 
Just want to know if I should get these, or get another swingarm stand that uses paddles.
based on the photos, it looks like the two screws are used to "wedge" lock the adjusters in place. they don't actually screw into anything on the swingarm itself. 
 
 
 

Well if that were the case I guess it wouldn't matter if the axle and rear wheel were in or out. Still like to hear from someone who has them on their bike. 

'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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rhb
A picture is worth 1,000 words, I am not understanding how these are safe to use when removing the wheel from the bike., I like the idea, and Yamaha has an official accessory that looks the same so the concept must be sound in some fashion.

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versysrider
Either the two end cap studs screw into the axle block so the axle slides back and forth with the adjuster, or the center stud goes through the axle block so you can move the axle backward and forward to adjust the chain. If any of the  studs go through or into the axle block then it must be trapped in the end of the swingarm so it cant be pulled out with the axle removed. Otherwise it must be wedged in place with the 2 outer studs as "jmacas87" stated. And after enlarging the pics I believe "jmacas87" is correct and they are wedged in place, so would be as secure with or without the axle.
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'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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rowdy
They are a knock-off of the Gilles Tooling version. Super easy install and will allow you to remove the rear wheel.
You don't have to loosen the chain or mess with the axle bolts.  Take the OEM ones off, put the new ones on and snug them down nicely.  Done.
 

Why can't left turners see us?

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rick
Are people just using these as a lift point for cleaning the rear wheel, or are they safe to use when removing the axle and rear wheel to change tires?  
What do the 2 studs in the back of the new axle block screw into inside the swingarm, and are the holes already there, or do you have to drill and tap some holes?
 
Just want to know if I should get these, or get another swingarm stand that uses paddles.
Like rowdy said, you don't have to touch the axle nut.  
Those Allen socket screws that go thru those blocks are not used, probably just there to illustrate what it looks like in place and aren't even in the shipment. The star shaped wheel becomes the adjuster and screws onto the threaded post that you now see poking out the back of the adjuster. 
 
If you look here http://www.yamahapartshouse.com/oemparts/a/yam/53a99b08f8700220a4415847/rear-wheel   part #24 is what you are replacing. The stud that pokes out the back is attached to part #22. That piece floats inside the swinger. The axle goes thru this piece. As you tighten the nut closest to the swinger that pulls that axle backward. 
 
As long as the spools don't snap off, there's no reason why you can't hoist the bike up there and even leave it - wheel or no. 

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superfishal
I got these and I like them. Easy to install other than one of the spool bolts being so cheaply made that an Allen key wouldn't go into it. I had a bolt that was better quality and worked. My swing arm stand has pads and spool supports so now I use the spools. It's much more secure when wrenching on it. I would recommend using the stock adjuster nuts because the one they give you is cheap aluminum. Not a bad part for the price.
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versysrider
Are people just using these as a lift point for cleaning the rear wheel, or are they safe to use when removing the axle and rear wheel to change tires?  
What do the 2 studs in the back of the new axle block screw into inside the swingarm, and are the holes already there, or do you have to drill and tap some holes?
 
Just want to know if I should get these, or get another swingarm stand that uses paddles.
Like rowdy said, you don't have to touch the axle nut.  
Those Allen socket screws that go thru those blocks are not used, probably just there to illustrate what it looks like in place and aren't even in the shipment. The star shaped wheel becomes the adjuster and screws onto the threaded post that you now see poking out the back of the adjuster. 
 
If you look here http://www.yamahapartshouse.com/oemparts/a/yam/53a99b08f8700220a4415847/rear-wheel   part #24 is what you are replacing. The stud that pokes out the back is attached to part #22. That piece floats inside the swinger. The axle goes thru this piece. As you tighten the nut closest to the swinger that pulls that axle backward. 
 
As long as the spools don't snap off, there's no reason why you can't hoist the bike up there and even leave it - wheel or no. 
Thanks for the link, don't know why I didn't think to look at the parts diagram for that. I knew something had to be attached to the axle to make it move back and forth, the diagram totally clears that up.
 

'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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versysrider
I got these and I like them. Easy to install other than one of the spool bolts being so cheaply made that an Allen key wouldn't go into it. I had a bolt that was better quality and worked. My swing arm stand has pads and spool supports so now I use the spools. It's much more secure when wrenching on it. I would recommend using the stock adjuster nuts because the one they give you is cheap aluminum. Not a bad part for the price.
Thanks for letting me know that. I was figuring I'd use the stock dual adjusting nuts, just because you can lock them against each other.
 

'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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rhb
I like these things, and now I see how they work, they seem the best solution to getting the wheel off the ground for all maintenance needs. Here are some pics of the one's I prefer,(in a choice of mix and match rainbow colors) they run from 48-71 dollars on Ebay and have a nut instead of a knob, but you should use your stock locking nut as well.
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591713a7eb66ad18f4d727ce1d0b843b_MC_MC-DR_banner.jpg
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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rowdy
I like these things, and now I see how they work, they seem the best solution to getting the wheel off the ground for all maintenance needs. Here are some pics of the one's I prefer,(in a choice of mix and match rainbow colors) they run from 48-71 dollars on Ebay and have a nut instead of a knob, but you should use your stock locking nut as well. 

Nice choice!  Like I mentioned, I have the Gilles Tooling version, and it is probably the most useful upgrade I have made on this bike. I also have a Pitbull rear spool stand and it makes chain lube and adjustment, oil changes, and other maintenance much easier.
I've developed a technique for getting the bike on the stand by getting the stand spool hooks under the spools (only left side stand wheel touching the ground), then lifting / pushing the left side of the bike upright, while the stand reaches level and both wheels touch, then stepping on the stand yoke and pushing it the rest of the way down lifting the bike completely onto the stand.  To release (I first make sure the kickstand is down), then I lift the stand handle while keeping the other hand and my body against the bike. When the stand starts to unload (go slowly) guide the bike to the left side and onto it's kickstand.  A little gentle backwards pressure to make sure the kickstand is in the locked position.  It very easy, and the spools make it all possible.
 

Why can't left turners see us?

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rick
I put a chunk of 2x6 under the side stand. This lifts the bike nearly vertical (but still on the stand w/o going over the other side) making it easier to get both spools hooked.

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KamelReds
Picked these up as well, install took ~15 minutes.
 
The anchors (or the extra "pins" that are there) I believe are for supporting the weight applied to the spools on the swingarm and not just the adjustment rod, could also be there to keep them secure if you loosen up the adjustment rod with the bike on a stand. I just tightened up my chain adjustment nuts, then tightened the allen bolts for the anchors.
 
2474S6h.jpg
 
Made cleaning the chain suuuuuper easy.  (as you can see, the PO and the dealer used crappy chain lube and never cleaned under the front sprocket cover -- which is what all that goop is on the cardboard)

It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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versysrider
Picked these up as well, install took ~15 minutes. 
The anchors (or the extra "pins" that are there) I believe are for supporting the weight applied to the spools on the swingarm and not just the adjustment rod, could also be there to keep them secure if you loosen up the adjustment rod with the bike on a stand. I just tightened up my chain adjustment nuts, then tightened the allen bolts for the anchors.
 
2474S6h.jpg
 
Made cleaning the chain suuuuuper easy.  (as you can see, the PO and the dealer used crappy chain lube and never cleaned under the front sprocket cover -- which is what all that goop is on the cardboard)
Good to know. So I guess your new adjuster/spools came with the allen head bolts, someone else said they didn't get them included. Got a project bike going? What's the air cooled inline 4 out of?
 

'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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KamelReds
Picked these up as well, install took ~15 minutes. 
The anchors (or the extra "pins" that are there) I believe are for supporting the weight applied to the spools on the swingarm and not just the adjustment rod, could also be there to keep them secure if you loosen up the adjustment rod with the bike on a stand. I just tightened up my chain adjustment nuts, then tightened the allen bolts for the anchors.
 
2474S6h.jpg
 
Made cleaning the chain suuuuuper easy.  (as you can see, the PO and the dealer used crappy chain lube and never cleaned under the front sprocket cover -- which is what all that goop is on the cardboard)
Good to know. So I guess your new adjuster/spools came with the allen head bolts, someone else said they didn't get them included. Got a project bike going? What's the air cooled inline 4 out of?

 
They did, I only reused the bolts from the chain adjustment.
 
And that's actually a triple :D Hope to be finishing up my '81 Yamaha XS850 cafe racer in the next month or so.
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It's all about keeping that rubber side down.

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versysrider
Good to know. So I guess your new adjuster/spools came with the allen head bolts, someone else said they didn't get them included. Got a project bike going? What's the air cooled inline 4 out of?

They did, I only reused the bolts from the chain adjustment. 
And that's actually a triple :D Hope to be finishing up my '81 Yamaha XS850 cafe racer in the next month or so.
K, nice. That's cool I'd like to see pics when you're done. After I wrote that, I looked again and thought no, I only see 3 exhaust ports not 4.
 
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'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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