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maz20

Motorcycle oil question

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maz20
Hi,
The FZ-07 manual permits 10w50 oil, but my dealer services with semi-synthetic 10w40 (yamalube). Granted, right after a fresh oil change (yamalube 10w40), the bike feels great, but after about 1-2K miles it feels like it needs another oil change.
 
I commute/ride almost everyday, and often have to sit through slow/heavy traffic, which causes my engine to get pretty hot (haven't got the overheated light yet!).
 
If I switch to full synthetic 10w50, will I probably get more miles out of the oil? I mean, would the clutch/engine feel smoother for a longer period of time/miles?

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bigdaddybane
I put Yamalube at 350 km (200 miles) and switched to full synthetic at my 1000 km (600 miles) dealer's service. IMO the bike runs the same ... nice and smooth.

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Guest ChicagoAJ
It shouldn't overheat even it runs all day at a standstill. Oil is a highly debated topic, if you search in the forums you'll find a few threads with discussions about different oils.

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robborboy
I use Rotella T5(full synthetic) in all of my bikes ever. 10w30. I buy it by the gallon and it has been absolutely fantastic through my seven years of riding.

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mjh937
I just changed my oil today at 8,000 miles. I did the last change at 4,000 and have been using Mobil 1 since the 2,000 mile change. It shifts smoother with new oil, but was not too bad with 4,000 miles on the old oil.

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dentalprodigy
OP I just made the switch to "synthetic" last night. Went with Rotella T6 mainly because it's cheaper than yamalube. Just saw on amazon, it's apparently ~16$ (subscribe & save option). I rode ~200 miles today and can't tell the difference between my old oil which was yamalube (with 3721 miles on that oil change). Bike temps seem to be the same aswell. 50+mph at 178 F and stand still traffic at ~200F+
 
I used these videos to help make the decision to switch. My understanding is that synthetic is better towards the end of the oil life. Even though I switched to synthetic, I'm still gonna change my oil at around 3000 miles.
 

 

 
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smiketar

I changed from Yamalube 10-40w to Motul 7100 10-40W and engine runs better ,also gear change improve.

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gregjet

Viscosity is a measure of flow rate NOT the ability to prevent wear. It IS important in terms of pumping the oil around and how thick the oill gets in an oil cooler when you cool it.

Lubricity ( ie shear strength under load) is what will determine how well the oil helps protect metal to metal surfaces ( piston and rings/bore, crankshaft/bearings, even ball bearings). Synth oils maintain their shear strength MUCH longer than mineral oils , even when the mineral oils have anti corrosive additives.

 

HOWEVER!!!! the majority of "wear" in a motor is chemical corrosion ( this has been known for a very long time). Oil "cracking" by sufficient temperature of the sulphur and nitrogen oxides ( inter ailia) is what protects the metal internal bits. This is why short trip motors "wear" faster than long trip motors. Synth oils are much more chemical stable than mineral. The real "secret" to motor life, from an oil point of view, is the right synth oil and changed often enough. Enough is a function of how well heated the oil gets in normal use.

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Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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r1limited

@gregjetis correct, for wear you must look at shear stability as viscosity breaks down so does the shear,shear simply is a value of resistance to viscosity caused by streas, heat etc.  As viscosity breaks down and pointed out CORRECT for the application can cause early break down of engine components.  A think oil in the wrong temp can cause a motor to not be fully protected at start up until operation temps.  The mixturs as well pointed out by gregjet is engineered as an approxamite hence temp ranges as a manual will establish for peak protection in differing climate areas.  When you actually are asking a question of what Oil I ask What is your specific application.  If you are racing oil a if you are cruizin oil b if you have a HD stuff turds from the back yar in it :)

 

This is a good article on oil formulation

 

https://www.amsoil.com/newsstand/articles/the-role-of-additives-in-motor-oil/

Edited by r1limited
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gregjet

Amsoil released some very good data a few years ago but most missed one of the really important messages in the data. ALL oils have less than 50% of the original lubricity after about 1200 miles ( then). This may have improved somewhat as oils progressed, but it remains that all oils have less than half their lubricity after a couple of thousand miles of NORMAL use. Synths take MUCH longer to degenerate than straight minerals. As stated before, it is the acid buildup that causes engine wear predominately, but the lower slipperiness means that the motor will produce less power and use more fuel. Also any contaminate ( such as blowby solids and metal from wear) will cause more mechanical damage as the lubricity decreases.

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Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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VertigoTX
10 minutes ago, gregjet said:

ALL oils have less than 50% of the original lubricity after about 1200 miles ( then). 

I don't have any background or knowledge in mechanics and related subjects.  What is the impact of having 50% lubricity on our bike?  Would this imply 1000 mile oil changes to be beneficial, or is it over kill?

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gregjet

"Would this imply 1000 mile oil changes to be beneficial, or is it over kill?"

If you are racing you change your oil even more often.

For the most of us my guess is 3000 to 5000km to give a balance of protection and value.

 

One thing to point out is that in many motors MINERAL oil is preferred for the first 1000 to 5000km depending on whether the motor has soft iron coating pistons. This allows the surfaces to polish to each other.


Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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r1limited

I will normally run by hours and determining how hard I road the bike.  Racing, its changed every run with filter, glad I do not race anymore, as I would do a track day, fresh oil before fresh oil after with filter.  Yes it is an expensive love affair I wont say hobby because it is not.

 

Great point on the break down, Amsoil did have the article and then some on thermal break down viscosity break down and how heat destroys the shear values.  I change at 1500 or 20 hours depending on riding conditions.  Thats just me

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“Laws that forbid the carrying of arms disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes.” --Thomas Jefferson quoting Cesare Beccaria

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