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ladyfz

Crashed a couple weekends ago...

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ladyfz
Hey guys. Long time no see, right? I haven't been on the forum in awhile but thought I'd come back to share my crash story. I'm still really bummed about it, as it just happened a couple weekends ago. Long story short, I was pulling out from a secondary road onto a main highway. On the main highway was some gravel that I didn't notice but sure did once the bike hit it. Front end instantly became unstable and what can I say? I panicked and must've grabbed throttle and target fixated. Down I went, or, up and over I went in a high side. It wasn't going that fast, maybe 10-15mph tops, but it somehow bent both front fork tubes inward. Ripped off the foot peg and some other silly plastic cosmetic damage. Thank god I had the slider on, and my full leather gear. I just got a little road rash on my right hip, which hurt like hell but it could've been worse.
 
The worst part is now I feel scared to ride and my confidence level is reeeeally humbled, let's just say that. Obviously, I have to repair the bike but how do I repair this scared feeling? I don't want to have this panic happen again if I ever am in an emergency situation. I live in NYC, so going for a ride means dealing with brutal traffic to get OUT of the city. I've not been too bothered by it before, just more of a nuisance...but now the thought of getting out in it still puts me on edge. I haven't ridden since the crash. I dunno maybe I just need more time off from riding as it did just happen not that long ago. I'm just bummed about the whole thing. I'm very thankful, however, for not being too seriously hurt and the bike just has minimal damage.
 
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ladyfz
P.S. Has anyone dealt with Progressive denying medical claims?

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sorkyah
P.S. Has anyone dealt with Progressive denying medical claims?
Not their medical claims... but they denied me twice for repairing my motorcycle.. finally called their home office to get some answers and claim reviewed
even then i ended up eating the cost of a few of the repairs myself
 
 
Getting back on and being pinpoint aware of everything until you get used to or over your fear.
i was more than a bit scared getting back on after 2 1/2 months but it feels mostly normal after my 3rd day back on the bike
 
 

ATGATT... ATTATT, two acronyms I live by.
 

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ornery
Yikes, sorry to hear about the spill. Glad you and the bike fared OK. Can't help with the insurance question, but you might want to try riding very late at night while traffic is low. Also, I've heard practicing on gravel or dirt can help you get used to the bike being loose. I'm going to try that myself soon. It makes sense...
 
Good luck!
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“The real cycle you're working on is a cycle called yourself.”
— Robert M. Pirsig (Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values)

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ladyfz
Thanks for your replies, sorkyah and ornery. Those are some good suggestions!

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go4geoff
As a fellow NYCer I'd say head out east on long Island. More open roads and less traffic can help to regain ur confidence. I remember when I lowsided my gixxer the first time it freaked me out from makin right hand turns. Almost hit another suv cause I wouldn't lean the bike fully to make the tight turn. Just giving yourself time to retrust the bike is all it takes. Kinda like when you first learned how to ride. But this time ur confidence will build back quicker. You'll also pay more attention to ur actions and realize how little movements can still equate to big results. We all go down at some point, better to get it out of the way with the ability to ride again and learn from our mistakes. Glad to hear you'll be ok tho! @ladyfz
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'15 Pearl White FZ-07 | Yoshi R77 Exhaust | ECU Reflash | Mad Hornets Shorty Levers | EvoTech Rad Guard | Yamaha Comfort Saddle | TST Industries Integrated Taillight | Motodynamics Fender Eliminator | Yamaha OEM Front LED Signals | Phillips MaxVision 130+ Bulb | OES Front/Rear Axle Sliders | Driven Racing TT Rearsets | Woodcraft 1.5" Clip-Ons | Woodcraft Engine & Water Pump Crash Cover | OEM Motocage Cage | LEDGlow SMD Mini Advanced Lighting Kit | Gilles Tooling Gauge Relocation Kit |

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thomascrown
Best thing to do when you hit gravel is to maintain throttle, and keep any steering input to a minimum. I nearly highsided powering out of a bend that had dense gravel on the exit. Luckily chopped the throttle in time, but the bike still tried to launch me to the moon when it caught traction. Ended up bashing my ankle against the rearset trying to stay on the bike.

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martyinaustin
for what it's worth, i've been down twice. once from a similar new rider sharp corner freak out/wipe out and once from riding through a "puddle" that ended up being knee keep and took me down. puddle aside, i went back the next weekend and re-tried that corner and did it. for some reason "getting back on the horse" and fixing my mistake made me able to get past it. in any case, i bet you don't make that mistake again.
 
glad you're ok,
marty

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howlinhoss
@ladyfz sorry to hear about your crash and I am glad your ok. I suggest taking it slow to get back to feeling normal. Take short rides on uncongested roads and take it easy. Remember to always go 75% of your ability so you have the other 25% for that oh s#$t moment. Also I highly suggest going to a track day. What you will learn about yourself and the bike at a trackday is invaluable and arguably more than you will ever learn whole riding on the steets.
 

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Beemer
It sounds like you let off the throttle, which would cause a high side. It's a common mistake. What you should've done is stay on the gas and keep your handle bars pointed in the direction you're wanting to go. The bike will likely be leaning so some body english may be require, like if the rear end kicks out to the right then you turn your handlebars to the right, twist your body to the right a little to match the handlebar position and throw you left leg out in front of you as if you're pointing forward with it but not held up too high. The foot should be just a few inches above the surface in preparation for getting it to the ground as quickly as you can. That way if the bike starts to slide out too much you can possibly plant that left foot hard and flat on the ground and keep it there to hold the bike up as it's moving. This does require some muscle and is not an easy maneuver. Also, it's optional. It's a more advanced maneuver. I'll put up a video so that you'll have a good visual of what I'm saying.
 
Other than that, I generally feather the throttle to control the slide which helps to prevent the rear end from sliding too far out and low siding and also to stop it from high siding as well. You can feel the bike slowly starting to get traction and feel the bike start to straighten out and stand back up again. (that's the good feeling) Just remember to cross your bars up or counter steer as some call it and keep those bars pointed in the direction you want to be going when you gain traction and straighten it out. I say this to all but I truly wish that everyone would take a course in off road riding and learn maneuvers in the dirt that they probably won't be taught on the street by standard street riders. That experience in the dirt can be applied to street riding and help to save your skin if nothing else. I'm glad you're alright, sorry about your bike and post shock. Stay very alert of everything on the road at a distance and react to it accordingly. If you couldn't avoid the gravel you only had to let off the gas some to avoid spinning the tire. I say get back in the saddle and ride. You don't go back to the sippy cup if you spill a drink do you? Ha! Have fun and be safe!
 
 
[video src=https://youtu.be/omi0LraJO14]  I'm not saying to ride crazy like this but pay close attention to how he feathers the throttle when he's in a slide to stay in control. when you feather the throttle you can actually feel what the rear tire is doing. More throttle and the rear tire can go further out, less and it can move back under the rest of the bike where most feel comfortable with it being.

Beemer

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bmwpowere36m3
Riding a dirt bike will do wonders for learning how to slide and control... plus, you can go 100% with less risk than on the street. Its all how being loose and throttle control.
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pineappleunderthesea
I had a similar experience on a large patch of gravel while turning left onto another road, I was in a lean and the bike instantly slipped, and in a fraction of a second I was low-siding before I could even react. I was going slow, though, and the bike had minimal damage since my hip/shoulder took the impact (I now wear hip armor, btw, those hips bruise like crazy!).
 
So yeah, just like you I became weary of taking curves too fast in case there's gravel lurking, but the episode taught me to scan ahead better. I also purposely rode on twisty roads to prove to myself that gravel on the road is not common at all--I would ride conservatively, then come back on that same stretch a little faster. A few months after I also took an advanced riding course (they offer them free in PA) that focused on making tight turns and leaning in a little more, so that helped build overall confidence.
 
So like all the others have said, nearly everyone I know seems to have a story about a low speed slide, but you brush yourself off and get back on the bike. If you need a confidence boost, freshen up with a riding class! If nothing else, those classes making riding fun!

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Eastern Kayaker
Sorry to read about your accident. It is good news your injuries were not serious and you are on the mend.
 
I have Progressive insurance, but did not get the medical coverage option, since I have good medical insurance through work. The medical coverage option through Progressive was very expensive to help cover my medical bills, so I did not get it. Your policy would have to show "Medical Coverage" on your declarations page. This is not the Liability coverage, which only covers damage to property and other persons caused by you. They may have denied your claim because you did not have the optional medical coverage. If you do have the medical coverage through Progressive, call them to see why they denied your claim.
 
Normal reaction to not want to get back on your bike again. Try taking your bike out on the weekends in the early morning hours with less traffic for short rides to build up your confidence. 
 
 
 

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zoltan
I'm sorry for hear that. But no worries. Just get back on your bike.
...
I had an accident worse than yours. I know how you feel. To be scared to ride but the thing is it's won't go away unless you are riding again.
...
Somebody mentioned it already -and it's true- if you have a chance get a smaller bike go off road for the weekends until your confidence comes back. Try to find out where your limit is. What you can do and what you can't. Starting slowly then push yourself to your limit. And when you feel that's enough just go back to the road with a big bike.
 
I did similar thing but I haven't got a dirt bike just a scooter.

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ladyfz
@ladyfz sorry to hear about your crash and I am glad your ok. I suggest taking it slow to get back to feeling normal. Take short rides on uncongested roads and take it easy. Remember to always go 75% of your ability so you have the other 25% for that oh s#$t moment. Also I highly suggest going to a track day. What you will learn about yourself and the bike at a trackday is invaluable and arguably more than you will ever learn whole riding on the steets.
Oooo, interesting. I've been interested in doing this, I've heard they have noob days at a nearby track :) 

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ladyfz
It sounds like you let off the throttle, which would cause a high side. It's a common mistake. What you should've done is stay on the gas and keep your handle bars pointed in the direction you're wanting to go. The bike will likely be leaning so some body english may be require, like if the rear end kicks out to the right then you turn your handlebars to the right, twist your body to the right a little to match the handlebar position and throw you left leg out in front of you as if you're pointing forward with it but not held up too high. The foot should be just a few inches above the surface in preparation for getting it to the ground as quickly as you can. That way if the bike starts to slide out too much you can possibly plant that left foot hard and flat on the ground and keep it there to hold the bike up as it's moving. This does require some muscle and is not an easy maneuver. Also, it's optional. It's a more advanced maneuver. I'll put up a video so that you'll have a good visual of what I'm saying. 
Other than that, I generally feather the throttle to control the slide which helps to prevent the rear end from sliding too far out and low siding and also to stop it from high siding as well. You can feel the bike slowly starting to get traction and feel the bike start to straighten out and stand back up again. (that's the good feeling) Just remember to cross your bars up or counter steer as some call it and keep those bars pointed in the direction you want to be going when you gain traction and straighten it out. I say this to all but I truly wish that everyone would take a course in off road riding and learn maneuvers in the dirt that they probably won't be taught on the street by standard street riders. That experience in the dirt can be applied to street riding and help to save your skin if nothing else. I'm glad you're alright, sorry about your bike and post shock. Stay very alert of everything on the road at a distance and react to it accordingly. If you couldn't avoid the gravel you only had to let off the gas some to avoid spinning the tire. I say get back in the saddle and ride. You don't go back to the sippy cup if you spill a drink do you? Ha! Have fun and be safe!
 
 
[video src=https://youtu.be/omi0LraJO14]  I'm not saying to ride crazy like this but pay close attention to how he feathers the throttle when he's in a slide to stay in control. when you feather the throttle you can actually feel what the rear tire is doing. More throttle and the rear tire can go further out, less and it can move back under the rest of the bike where most feel comfortable with it being.
omg this guy's control is insane. i would kill myself lol but totally agree on the dirt bike courses a couple of you have suggested. My husband took a weekend beginner dirt bike course last summer and came home raving about how much he learned. After this, I definitely could benefit from some sort of advanced rider course. Thanks so much for the support everyone. It has really lifted my spirits! No sippy cups for me! 
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