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michaelcly

A u-turn trick I had forgotten about

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michaelcly

Leaving work, I have to make a tight u-turn on to the parking garage exit ramp. Half of the time I had to drop a foot to stay upright. I didn't want to hit the throttle and over correct, but I don't like looking like a dork either. Then I remembered a trick a BMW rider showed me a long time ago but had forgotten—and it works. Keep a little throttle on and slip the clutch. You'll have more control over speed. Also turn your head to where you are trying to get to (keeps you from fixating). Works for me...haven't paddle footed since.    

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2015 FZ07; Yoshimura Exhaust; Yoshimura Fender Eliminator; Shorty levers; Bazzaz EFC, frame sliders, LED signals, Yamaha Comfy Seat, Madstad Windshield.

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bmwpowere36m3

That's what they teach in the MSF course, along with dragging the rear brake. Additionally I like to scoot over on the seat opposite the direction of the turn (butt cheek over seat edge) to weigh the outside.

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duenan

Not necessarily trying to beat you down but clutch control is a basic technique, one of the first things they teach you in MSF.
 
Its not a trick, it should be common knowledge to any and all motorcyclists. You can employ clutch control in all low speed maneuvers, not just u turns. Like riding extremely slow in parking lots and such. Motorcycles aren't like cars. The clutch are designed to take being half-engaged (slipped).
 
I'd be willing to say I use clutch control on a daily basis. But then I am a city rider.
 
It's good that you've discovered it for yourself recently but just know its not something you pull out occasionally, you should be using it more often for more control in slow speeds (safety reasons).

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Engaging with people that have personality disorders on a message board is like arguing with a rock.

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Beemer

There's another way. It's funner but risky if you haven't practiced it in the dirt first. (on dirt bike)
 
 
[video src=https://youtu.be/GZBoJBaxcyo]

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Beemer

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michaelcly
Not necessarily trying to beat you down but clutch control is a basic technique, one of the first things they teach you in MSF. 
Its not a trick, it should be common knowledge to any and all motorcyclists. You can employ clutch control in all low speed maneuvers, not just u turns. Like riding extremely slow in parking lots and such. Motorcycles aren't like cars. The clutch are designed to take being half-engaged (slipped).
 
I'd be willing to say I use clutch control on a daily basis. But then I am a city rider.
 
It's good that you've discovered it for yourself recently but just know its not something you pull out occasionally, you should be using it more often for more control in slow speeds (safety reasons).
I should probably go take that (MSF). I've had a MC endorsement on my license for 45 years and the only thing I ever had to do was ride around some pylons and take a written test. I haven't ridden for more than 10 years prior to owning this FZ 07. I've always had bikes but gave it up because it worried my wife so much. She passed away 4 months ago and I decided to start riding again. It's been a blast and I'm learning more about the proper way to ride. A lot of things came back instantly but this newer bikes are so much more capable. I do not take offense at your comment...it is appreciated.  Yeah, I don't think it would hurt to take the MSF. I didn't even learn about counter steering until my last bike when I read Twist of the Wrist pt 2.  
Bikes I've had the pleasure of owning:
1965 Honda 50 Cub. You never forget your first.
1965 Honda 65 Super Sport. I thought I was cooler than I was.
Cushman Mailster. Handlebars like a bike, pedals like a car.
1969 Kawasaki Bushwacker. I loved this bike. Quick too.
Suzuki Titan 500 2-stroke. Like driving a tank.
Kawasaki MachIII. should have died more than once.
250 Kawasaki dual. Nice bike, a little heavy.
350 BSA one lunger. I never really got it running.
1956 Hard-tail Pan Head. Worst bike I ever owned.
1975 Honda 360CL. Got it new-hopelessly average.
1972 Honda 450 Scrambler. Harley wheel laced to the rear hub.
1974 Suzuki TS 185. This was a great little dual purpose bike.
1968 Kawasaki Avenger 350 scrambler. I loved this bike.
1978 Suzuki 550L. This was a surprisingly nice ride.
1980 Honda 500CX. Very nice bike but geared way low.
1984 Honda V65 1100 Sabre. Wicked fast.
1982 Yamaha 650 Maxim. Great all around bike.
2015 FZ 07. Quite a difference from the others. I love it.
 
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2015 FZ07; Yoshimura Exhaust; Yoshimura Fender Eliminator; Shorty levers; Bazzaz EFC, frame sliders, LED signals, Yamaha Comfy Seat, Madstad Windshield.

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