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woodykillo

Parents were mad!

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woodykillo
If you are thinking of getting a motorcycle don't ask, just do it !
I caught them yesterday taking pictures with it, so I think I'm good.
I'm a new rider and I'm hoping to learn a lot from other riders on this site
Feel free to give me advice and guide me through the life of a motorcyclist
Thank you all ride safe.c7b776dc6bc6016150d54f6b7ff01462.jpg
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Beemer
Welcome, nice bike, beeeee careful. (typical parents, lol!)

Beemer

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DanZieg
Nice bike, Raven seems to be the popular color choice of 2016 (I just picked one up too)
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jetgirl
My parents were mad when I got back into motorcycling a few years ago and I was 44 then! They just love you and they worry but they should come around. Them taking pictures is a good sign. Be careful out there woodykillo.
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ravenlord
Welcome. The Parents either love motorcycles (my old man) or hate them... Mother. You on the other hand have bought the right bike and are going to love it.
 
 
One thing, unless you've attached the strap to the rear seat and I can't see it, don't leave your helmet one the rear seat. Once she drops on the ground it has become less capable of saving your life.
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caliesv
Respect the throttle. I been riding street bikes for 12 years. The biggest thing that irks me is when people say they "aren't scared" of riding, being scared keeps you alive. Every bike I get on I'm scared of it, to a point. This dosent mean you won't be a capable or a bad ass rider. Just means you will keep the respect any bike demands while you're on it.
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biggaudi
Welcome and be safe! As a relative newbie myself I've been trying to soak up as much info as I can. But the one thing that helps me out the most is just to remain relaxed, pay attention, and always be smooth in all things motorcycle (throttle, braking, countersteering, and torqueing on bolts or screws when you DIY :-P )

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cndnmax
Where are you located? Practice low speed parking lot drills. It will teach you how to properly work the clutch and throttle so you don't get accidental wheelies or loss of traction. Go at your own pace and don't try to follow others.

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woodykillo
 

Welcome and be safe! As a relative newbie myself I've been trying to soak up as much info as I can. But the one thing that helps me out the most is just to remain relaxed, pay attention, and always be smooth in all things motorcycle (throttle, braking, countersteering, and torqueing on bolts or screws when you DIY :-P )
I accidentally did a wheelie last week, trying to ride next to an expert rider. I'm starting to understand how fragile the throttle is
I am scared right now, more scared than having fun.

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SkH
This is a true story.
 
My parents are the kind of parents who denounce motorcycles as the devils tools. I don't know why, I don't even remember why, but we were all acutely aware of this EVEN though me and my brothers have never owned motorcycles. As a **** you to them, my oldest brother immediately bought a ninja zx6 when he left the roost. He brings it over to the parent's house (me and my other brother are still a bit young to leave the roost) and he brings us out there to show us his new motorcycle. Then he intentionally revs it loud over and over and my dad came out of the house. He starts yelling at my oldest brother, they argue, and he rides off.
 
My other brother owned a scooter (which he crashed a few months in) and currently in the market of an electric motorcycle (he has an aversion to shifting).
 
I own 2 motorcycles.
 
Moral of the story: You want your kids to stay away from something, DO NOT create a large amount of negative energy towards it otherwise you will pretty much just guarantee them to get into it. Think of that old cliche with the pastor's daughters.
 
Oh wait, this has nothing to do with this topic. Oh yes, yes it does... let me turn it around!
 
My parents still don't know I own motorcycles and they are in their 60s! But they will be visiting this Nov (because my brother is expecting another poop maker to be born in the summer), so they will come over for 2 weeks, 1 week they are expected to stay with me. And I can guarantee they will be mad at their fully grown adult son for owning a motorcycle. Huzzah! Parents. Gotta love 'em. I vow to get my mom on the back for a ride though. I will make it happen.
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Eastern Kayaker
If you have not done this already, take the MSF Basic Rider course. Like others have said, practice in empty parking lots and use less traveled side roads until you get more confident.

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woodykillo
 

Where are you located? Practice low speed parking lot drills. It will teach you how to properly work the clutch and throttle so you don't get accidental wheelies or loss of traction. Go at your own pace and don't try to follow others.
In Long Beach, I went for a ride and met with some random guy on a Harley, he offered to guide me to my destination, it was the hardest thing to do. I stalled and did an accidental wheelie ! He was very helpful in stopping traffic. I don't think I'm ready to ride with anyone yet lol
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dmrphy03
As many have mentioned...be very careful and respect the bike! I am not new to bikes, but I am new here to the forum as I just bought my FZ and there seems to be a lot of great, caring people here that are more than willing to help with anything. Feel free to take advantage of that.
 
I'm 31 and my parents got mad when I bought this one as well, even though it's my 3rd street bike. I know they just care, that's not such a bad thing...

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Vmoto
I posted this on a similar reddit topic:
 
"Surprisingly my parents were both very cool with me getting a bike. In fact it was my mom who told my to dad to help finance a new bike instead of me getting an older, beat up one. I think the big factor is that they grew up in India and its nothing but scooters and motorcycles there. So they probably accepted me getting a motorcycle even before I was comfortable with it."

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Guest 2wheeler
Parents are strange animals espcially when it comes to their kids on motorcycles! Funny in my case because my Dad met my Mom in 1947 at college where he was going on the GI Bill after WWII, and his only form of transportation was an Indian Scout which he bought at the end of the war. He left me his leather Snoopy helmet and the blue tinted glass and leather googles - VERY COOL!
 
My father was always pro-bike, and my Mom hated them. I got my first mini-bike (Rupp Roadster 2) at 13 which did not make my Mom happy. Had my first serious wreck 2 years on a Yamaha 100 Enduro, and was told to sell my bike which I eventually did. A year later I bought another dirt bike but didn't tell them, and stored it at a friend's house. They eventually found out about that one and let me keep it. I think my Dad was impressed with the amount of balls I had to buy it!
 
40 years and 40 motorcycles later, I'm on an FZ-07 - ain't evolution great!!!
 
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20vavant
 
My mother wouldn't allow me to get a bike when I lived under her roof. I actually owned the bike 2 weeks before she found out. She came out to look at it when I rode it over and just tells me to be safe!
 

One thing, unless you've attached the strap to the rear seat and I can't see it, don't leave your helmet one the rear seat. Once she drops on the ground it has become less capable of saving your life.
Or you break off a sun visor lever.... >:D 

2015 Yamaha FZ07 - Woodcraft clip-ons w/ bar end sliders, Yoshimura Exhaust, Graves Fender Eliminator, Cyclops LED Headlight, Motodynamic integrated tail light, Carbon Fiber Heel Guards, Bridgestone Battlax BT003 tires, Forks by Matt, PSR shorty levers, OES Frame & Axle sliders.
 
2014 Lexus IS350

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Simbadc650
yep parents same way. Going to take the CHP motorcycle class, NO UR NOT. Passed the chp motorcycle class, ur not getting a bike. Get a 250c, GET IT OUT OF HERE. Dad comes out when im doing upgrades to FZ07, they will get used to it. Even more since I got sick, so i got more sick days than good days.

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phicurious86

Welcome and be safe! As a relative newbie myself I've been trying to soak up as much info as I can. But the one thing that helps me out the most is just to remain relaxed, pay attention, and always be smooth in all things motorcycle (throttle, braking, countersteering, and torqueing on bolts or screws when you DIY :-P )
I accidentally did a wheelie last week, trying to ride next to an expert rider. I'm starting to understand how fragile the throttle is I am scared right now, more scared than having fun.
No shame in that woody. The fizz definitely has some sizzle that can get brand new riders in trouble. I'd strongly recommend taking a basic rider safety course and see if you can't find a course that lets you use your bike.
 
Practice easing the clutch in when you're starting from a stop to help prevent "jerk starts" that may cause the bike to stall or even pop the wheel up in lower gears depending on how much throttle you're using. What you want to avoid is pulling the clutch in and then just letting it go so that the clutch lever snaps open. Also, not a bad idea to practice playing nice with the throttle. Pro-tip start the bike in second gear and do your practicing with throttle control in 2nd. The bike will be far less jumpy.
 

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twowheeladdict
I moved 1200 miles right after high school and the first thing I saved up for was a bike. Year round riding in Florida.
 
I rode friends bikes growing up, but could never have my own because Mom was scared and Dad supported Mom. She is 79 and still scared for me 30 something years and hundreds of thousands of miles later.
 
My advice to you is gear, training, practice.
 
Never ride angry, always be willing to give up your right of way, and keep your ego in check.
 
Don't let others influence what you do and the choices you make. Many of your so called friends are going to want to see you do something stupid on your bike. They are just hoping you wreck.
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2015 FZ-07

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superhawk848
Welcome. The Parents either love motorcycles (my old man) or hate them... Mother. You on the other hand have bought the right bike and are going to love it. 
 
One thing, unless you've attached the strap to the rear seat and I can't see it, don't leave your helmet one the rear seat. Once she drops on the ground it has become less capable of saving your life.
Not true

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ravenlord
Welcome. The Parents either love motorcycles (my old man) or hate them... Mother. You on the other hand have bought the right bike and are going to love it. 
 
One thing, unless you've attached the strap to the rear seat and I can't see it, don't leave your helmet one the rear seat. Once she drops on the ground it has become less capable of saving your life.
Not true
Care to explain what part of the quotation is not true, and your reasoning behind it.
 

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superhawk848
Not true
Care to explain what part of the quotation is not true, and your reasoning behind it.
I'm in the Motorsports industry, and have talked to many a helmet rep. A helmet falling off a moto seat doesn't produce enough force to cause an internal damage. I've talked to customers that have sent their helmets in after dropping them, and they came back passing the x-ray test. I crashed at the track many years ago and made contact with the ground ( not direct impact, but helmet sliding on the ground that passed the xr-ray test. I still retired it, just curious about the internal damage.  Now if someone has a piece of shit helmet like a bilt, or some other crap helmet, that's another story. I'm not saying if you drop your helmet you shouldn't send it in to be tested, if it will give you piece of mind then by all means send it in.

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ravenlord
Care to explain what part of the quotation is not true, and your reasoning behind it.
I'm in the Motorsports industry, and have talked to many a helmet rep. A helmet falling off a moto seat doesn't produce enough force to cause an internal damage. I've talked to customers that have sent their helmets in after dropping them, and they came back passing the x-ray test. I crashed at the track many years ago and made contact with the ground ( not direct impact, but helmet sliding on the ground that passed the xr-ray test. I still retired it, just curious about the internal damage.  Now if someone has a piece of Shet helmet like a bilt, or some other crap helmet, that's another story. I'm not saying if you drop your helmet you shouldn't send it in to be tested, if it will give you piece of mind then by all means send it in.
 
Well, now I know that.
 
Regardless, bad habit, dropping an expensive piece of safety gear is still rather counter productive.
 

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superhawk848

Well, now I know that. 
Regardless, bad habit, dropping an expensive piece of safety gear is still rather counter productive.

 
 
AGREED!

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cookfreeordie89
I always wanted a bike when I was little. I knew my dad rode back in the day, so when I bought mine I made sure I let him ride it first. Nothing but smooth sailing after that
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