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botbullet0

Wheelie tips?

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botbullet0
Just started learning how to wheelie. I have first gear power ups down somewhat well by letting off and then giving it a lot of throttle once the front compresses. I can pop it up a foot or two and chase it out, but it comes up really quick when I get it higher than that and I cut throttle pretty quickly. I want to start learning second gear clutch ups now, but I have a few questions. I want to do everything I can to prevent looping out.
 
Starting speed?
How hard do I actually need to pop the clutch? Should I slip it with one finger?
Will it just take practice to get over the feeling that I'm going to flip off when I'm not really that high?
Are clutch ups in second smoother than a power up in first? It's pretty jarring and comes up fast in first.
Any other tips that helped you would be great.
 
Thanks!

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hobbs
My only tip; cover your rear brake... always.
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rsike
I feel so bad doing clutch ups. It's really bad for the chain and sprocket. My best advice to you to wheelie comfortably is to power wheelie in 2nd gear. Thats what I do all the time.
Ride steady at about 6500 rpm then completely let go and give it full throttle and you'll get a really decent wheelie that doesn't jerk you up or put fear in your heart lol. Most importantly, do as hobbs suggested. Cover your rear brake at all times.
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fz07fanboy
I would advise power wheelie in 2nd as well. No need to clutch wheelie in that gear. It has plenty of power just getting up in RPMs, letting of and then full on and it will come up.
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jake
I'll give you a tip don't do them....:(
 
 
 
That would be lame if someone said that since these things do it without trying lol.
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bikelife38
power up wheelies gain too much speed in getting the wheel up. clutching up obviously will wear your clutch and chain/sprockets faster but its really not THAT bad. if you ride like a stunt rider, of course its gonna be really harsh on these parts but for the occasional wheelies, you'll be fine. my advice to you would be to go on a back road, somewhere that has little to no traffic and just start clutching it up. start with second gear. first is a waste and 3rd gets you moving at pretty high speeds, probably too much for someone learning. start clutching it up to the point where its only getting off the ground a little. just so you can get a feel for it. then you'll start getting higher and higher, and then you can start trying to carry them. but first things first you have to get a good feeling of how much throttle you need to use, and what speeds work best for you in getting it up. good luck and be careful. dont worry about other people judging your puny little beginner wheelies, they hate you anyway just because you are doing them
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Lucius
Like what most people said on here. I know from experience that the FZ07 has plenty of power to lift the front wheel in 2nd gear. Like they said, cover the rear brake just in case. After the exhaust and fuel controller, I started practicing clutch-ups in 3rd. The 2nd gear power-ups will get you used to the feeling of the bike in a wheelie, but you're almost always chasing it which means, you'll often hit the rev limiter in 2nd. Being new to wheelies and doing about 70mph is not a smart choice. Just take your time and have a friend along in case anything goes wrong. I'd like to stop doing them myself, but I can't help myself.
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botbullet0
I practiced 2nd gear power ups and could get it up to the balance point pretty consistently. I only weigh 130 though, so that probably helps. They're a lot of fun!

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yamahappy74
My wheelies are almost always 1st gear power ups, and since I tend to be nervous about doing them in the first place, they tend to be pretty shallow and short lived. Still fun to do though. 2nd gear clutch ups have happened a few times for me as well, but as I don't do it often, I don't have a good feel for the best RPM range to be in, how much engine speed I need before I dump the clutch, how fast I should be going, etc. 1st gear ups are just easier for me.

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botbullet0
I accelerate to around 25-30 mph in second, then cut all throttle and rip it pretty hard. Comes right up and then I just ride it out. It's a lot smoother and more predictable than first for sure.
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pitapola
Hey guys. I was going through the forum's posts an d I ran into this, so since I have a couple of questions myself I thought I could post them here.
 
I'm also at the beginning of my "wheelie life", basically doing (small for the time being) 2nd gear power wheelies. Is there a reason to try switching to clutch ups? I mean, on other bikes it could be the only way to get it up, but on our bike 1st and 2nd power wheelies are really easy. Is there some other reason to try the clutch method?
 
Also, I have a problem with engine braking. After I get the front wheel up, cutting the throttle means I almost immediately lose the height I gained because of engine braking. What am I doing wrong? Should I be using the rear brake to balance myself and keep the throttle open?
 
Thanks for any tips.

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pitapola
Here's some perspective for you..... 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4QtubZoZQM
 

I don't get what you're saying. The guy's fine, so no big deal. I know it's almost inevitable to fall while learning to wheelie and it's something I'm Ok with.  
I'm pretty sure there aren't many guys doing trackdays who've never fallen down. It's part of the game more or less. I've personally had two spills so far in the track but I keep going because I fucking love it. So you do your thing and I'll do mine.  :P
 
 
 
 
 

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Guest 2wheeler
Here's some perspective for you.....
I don't get what you're saying. The guy's fine, so no big deal. I know it's almost inevitable to fall while learning to wheelie and it's something I'm Ok with.  
I'm pretty sure there aren't many guys doing trackdays who've never fallen down. It's part of the game more or less. I've personally had two spills so far in the track but I keep going because I f@#%ing love it. So you do your thing and I'll do mine.  :P
 
 

Like my post said... perspective 
Some folks don't realize what playing around can do.
 
Myself… been there/done that. I was taking a trials bike class several years ago when I flipped a wheelie. It took me a month before I was physically right again.
 
I just don't have any desire to spend the time or the money to fix a bike after I screwed up. Hell, it's bad enough trying to not screw up from the idiots on the road. That doesn't even bring in the fact that being in pain for an extended time sucks!
 
If you are totally cool with how you ride your bike, have at it. I truly hope that you don't get in a wreck, and more importantly cause anybody else to wreck.
 
 
 
 
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bigdaddybane
Here's some perspective for you..... 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4QtubZoZQM
 

I know it's almost inevitable to fall while learning to wheelie and it's something I'm Ok with.  
You're a brave soul ... falling is something you're OK with. I hope you're not gonna apply the same logic while racing or speeding.  :)  
 
 
 

 

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