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cndnmax

DIY: Turning your 2-wire LED signal into 3-wire Signal(DRL)

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cndnmax
I wanted to keep my DRL function but change out my Signals to LEDs. Looking online i found a few overly complicated or expensive methods of converting 2-wire signals into 3-wire signals. I decided to dumb it back down and keep it simple. 
 
I've got a bunch of extra parts for option 2/3/4, so if you would like some parts or you are not comfortable building these Message me.
 
 
Option 1:
 
Blinker Genie ($30): Uses a solid state relay and the pulsating signal current to interrupt the DRL function (DRL=Full Brightness, Signals = off/on). Overpriced for what it does. States that Hondas and other bikes that interrupt the DRL current while signals are active need an extra constant wire to work properly (See option 4 for the truth).
 
 
Cons: Expensive, Rear turn signals will be out of sync, Full-Brightness DRL (may burn out/melt some signals). Won’t fit through the 10mm Bolt hole.
 
Pros: Solid State Relay
 
 
Option 2:
 
 
Resistor/Diode (very cheap): Use a resistor to lower the voltage of the DRL line and use diodes to block current backflow to signal dash light. Signal and DRL wires are connected together to make a 2-1 wire. DRL are dimmer, Signal flashes at full brightness.
 
 
Pros: Very Cheap and simple to make. Rear signals remain in sync. LEDs do not receive constant full power so they will not melt/burn up. Will fit through the 10mm bolt hole.
 
Cons: Resistor size will vary based on how much current the LED signals will require. Minor electrical knowledge required.
 
 
Option%202.jpg
 
Option 3:

 
12v Mini relay (very cheap): this is a basic version of the Blinker genie. DRL connects to normally Closed contact and the signal wire connects to the coil. When signal wire is active it interrupts the DRL function resulting in the Off/On blink.
 
Pros: Simple, works with all LED/filament signals without the need to do some Calculations like the resistor version
 
Cons: Rear signals will be out of sync, again-Full brightness DRLs.
 
 
Option%203.jpg
 
Option 4:

***Only for Hondas and other bikes that interrupt current to DRLs when signals are active.

Diodes: I found it rather ridiculous that Blinker genie would ask you to run another set of wires to make them work with your bike when the reality was that you did not even need a blinker genie! Bastards!
 
All you need to do is add a diode to the DRL and Signal wire then connect the both to the same POS wire on the signals. Your signals will act the exact same way they did with the 3-wrie signals.
 
Option%204.jpg
 
I chose to use Option 2.
Based on the Current of my LED signals I calculated that a 1.5K Ohm resistor would give me 6Volt DRL and 12Volt Signals (Voltage=Current X Resistance ; Power=Current X Voltage). I used a small solder board to keep things tidy as well as OEM Connector Adapters. 
 
 
IMG_6093.jpgIMG_6094%201.jpg
 
 
[video src=https://youtu.be/YQ1j-Y9zOcs]
 
 
 
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wickedtwister
Just a warning not all lights are designed for running light use. Some members have had lights from some company's melt when used as DRL's. Can't remember the brand that had the issues.

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cndnmax
Just a warning not all lights are designed for running light use. Some members have had lights from some company's melt when used as DRL's. Can't remember the brand that had the issues.
 
Yes, I mentioned that in the post. Mainly an issue for filament bulbs or high powered LEDs (regular 3mm LEDs don't get hot enough) with DRL at full brightness. This is why I prefer the resistor option, less voltage as DRL means less current which means less heat.

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RobMoore
Is the blue wire the DRL?
 
I have black blue and brown on one, and black blue and green on another. I would assume the blue is the DRL and the green and brown are the switched turn signal positives.

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Beemer
Is the blue wire the DRL? 
I have black blue and brown on one, and black blue and green on another. I would assume the blue is the DRL and the green and brown are the switched turn signal positives.
RobMoore - As I recall, the blue on the right side was the DRL and the brown on the left side was the DRL.

Beemer

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RobMoore
I just did my LED signals that came with an eBay fender eliminator. Both blue wires are the DRLs.

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cndnmax
Is the blue wire the DRL? 
I have black blue and brown on one, and black blue and green on another. I would assume the blue is the DRL and the green and brown are the switched turn signal positives.
 
Correct. The green and brown wires are the signals, blue is DRL, black ground.

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wickedtwister
Another option if you wanted the drl to be off when its blinking is a relay capacitor and a resistor. Basically wire the capacitor/resistor into the coil side of the relay and hook it to the flasher signal. The input from the flashers "charges" the capacitor and the relay keeps the voltage from draining off when the flasher is off and keeps the coil charged. If you hook the drl light to the normally closed side and the flasher wire to the switched side of the relay you now have the same thing as the blinker genie but for 10 bucks. I can post part numbers of everything if people would like. If you look at my videos of my brake and turn signal panels this is how I am able to switch the brake light off when the turn signals are on. You will need a new flasher relay (under left tank panel) that works with LEDs.

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cndnmax
Another option if you wanted the drl to be off when its blinking is a relay capacitor and a resistor. Basically wire the capacitor/resistor into the coil side of the relay and hook it to the flasher signal. The input from the flashers "charges" the capacitor and the relay keeps the voltage from draining off when the flasher is off and keeps the coil charged. If you hook the drl light to the normally closed side and the flasher wire to the switched side of the relay you now have the same thing as the blinker genie but for 10 bucks. I can post part numbers of everything if people would like. If you look at my videos of my brake and turn signal panels this is how I am able to switch the brake light off when the turn signals are on. You will need a new flasher relay (under left tank panel) that works with LEDs.
 
You can replicate the genie with just the relay (option 3 above). With your brake/signal panels you need to block the brake function when flashers are active , your version is just not needed for the front and with a basic single circuit signal and constant DRL. Although, it's a neat trick for a dual purpose rear signal.

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amycyclenut
This is all very interesting. I just put LED's all around. I bought an LED compatible relay and Yamaha OEM Type Blinker Turn Signal Wiring Harness Connectors. My new LED turn signals were all two-wire of course. Both front AND back are DRL.

2015 FZ-07
1986 FZ600
1974 CB450
1973 RD350
sold: 1970 CB350, 1972 CB175, 2009 Vespa S 150

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red93093
I'm looking to do something similar with the front indicators that I made. Do you mind sharing how you calculated the resistor size for the DRL and what diodes I would need? Thanks in advance.

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cndnmax
I'm looking to do something similar with the front indicators that I made. Do you mind sharing how you calculated the resistor size for the DRL and what diodes I would need? Thanks in advance.
 
I used a variable power supply to find the brightness I wanted (around 6-7 volts worked for me) then measured the current that one signal used at that brightness. Resistance=voltage/current.
You could also use one of those variable resistors to dial in the brightness using 12v then measure that resistance.
 
Let me know what you come up with, I have a bunch of diodes and some resistors that might work for you.

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red93093
Okay so as far as variable power supply goes I have a 1 amp trickle charger that will switch between 12v and 6v, at 6v it looks perfect for DRLs. Will that work? And with the "battery" at 6v I get a current reading at .03. So 6/.03=200?

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red93093
Okay so as far as variable power supply goes I have a 1 amp trickle charger that will switch between 12v and 6v, at 6v it looks perfect for DRLs. Will that work? And with the "battery" at 6v I get a current reading at .03. So 6/.03=200?
 
 
Or would it be 12.6/.03=420?

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cndnmax
Okay so as far as variable power supply goes I have a 1 amp trickle charger that will switch between 12v and 6v, at 6v it looks perfect for DRLs. Will that work? And with the "battery" at 6v I get a current reading at .03. So 6/.03=200?
 
If the charger is giving constant 6v then your reading should be fine, did u use a multimeter for current or was their s gauge on the charger.
 
If ur current is right(it seems a little high) then 200ohms should work.

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red93093
I just double checked everything. The Charger is putting out 6.6v and the current reading is still at .03 but it is a cheap multimeter. So in the resistor formula I would use 12.6 because I want a resistor that will give me the .03 current when the input is around 12.6? Or is my thinking way off. Again thanks for your help.
image_5.jpeg

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cndnmax
Since you will be wired in series your resistor will be dropping six volts and you led will be dropping the other six volts. source voltage with .03 amp will give you your total resistance and not your resistor value.

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potatochips
There was a thread, see my post, #5. I've actually since then purchased genies for my 07 rather than making them, just laziness. I would have copied the post, but on my phone. The original post I made was for a Yamaha WR250X on supermotojunkie, it worked for that Yamaha.
 
http://fz07.org/thread/1394

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red93093
You helped out a bunch. Thank you. This is what I ended up with.

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Jeckler
I just did this today on mine, using option 2. I think my (undiagnosed) OCD wouldn't let me use options 1 or 3, and of course we can't use option 4. My brain was a bit fried from working all day :) and I didn't want to do math, so since a pack of 5 resistors is $1.50 from RS, I picked up 330 and 470 ohm. Plus 4, 1N4003 diodes. After trying both values, I settled on 330ohm, as they were a little brighter, but still had a definite contrast to fully lit.
$6 and some soldering later, result...
DRL only
IMG_0353%202_zps8yibsn9l.jpg
 
DRL on the right (as sitting on the bike), signal on the left...
IMG_0344%202_zpscdznvdez.jpg
 
GIFage...
BlinkersBlinking1_zps1rv8j5ka.gif

- Andy

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huntb
Make sure to factor in the forward voltage (Vf) drop from the diodes when making your current calculations. It won't make a huge difference, but standard diodes like a 1N4001 has a forward voltage drop of 1.1V, so instead of the turn signal getting 12.6V its getting 11.5V.
 
A better option would be to use a Schottky diode. They tend to have a much lower Vf than standard diodes
 
I = (12.6-Vf)/R where I is current and R is resitance.

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cndnmax
Make sure to factor in the forward voltage (Vf) drop from the diodes when making your current calculations. It won't make a huge difference, but standard diodes like a 1N4001 has a forward voltage drop of 1.1V, so instead of the turn signal getting 12.6V its getting 11.5V. 
A better option would be to use a Schottky diode. They tend to have a much lower Vf than standard diodes
 
I = (12.6-Vf)/R where I is current and R is resitance.
 
Didn't think of that, you're probably looking at more of a 0.7V drop due to the really low current. Your charging system will make up the difference anyways but that's good to know. If you have some cheap dim led's you won't want to give up any voltage.

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oggie03
I recently purchased the R&G Aero led. I bought the resistors too. Mine are all still blinking fast. I actually do not want the drl function. I haven't hooked that wire up to anything yet. Do i need to? Any help would be appreciated.
 
Thank you,

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cndnmax
I recently purchased the R&G Aero led. I bought the resistors too. Mine are all still blinking fast. I actually do not want the drl function. I haven't hooked that wire up to anything yet. Do i need to? Any help would be appreciated.  
Thank you,
 
Fast blinking is a different issue, the flasher relay needs a certain load to flash properly. Leds do not have enough load for the stock relay. You can either wire in a 10watt resistor across the pos-neg wires of each signals or just buy a cheap led relay online. Cheap led relay is your best bet, do a search on here to find the right one.

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