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Cruizin

If you are new to riding, please get this book.

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Cruizin
It is the very best read for new and even experienced riders that I have ever read.
 
http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Motorcycling-Ultimate-Guide-Riding/dp/1620081199/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1428805470&sr=8-1&keywords=proficient+motorcycling
 
shet, if ya cant afford it, PM me and I'll loan you my copy. I read it ea spring as a reminder.
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pantheraleo
It is the very best read for new and even experienced riders that I have ever read.  
http://www.amazon.com/Proficient-Motorcycling-Ultimate-Guide-Riding/dp/1620081199/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1428805470&sr=8-1&keywords=proficient+motorcycling
 
shet, if ya cant afford it, PM me and I'll loan you my copy. I read it ea spring as a reminder.
Looks interesting. I'm in the middle of Lee Parks Total Control book.
 
I found chapter 4 on Fear to be fascinating. I learned a lot in the suspension chapter, too.
 
I will check yours out next, sir.

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craigm
Just ordered this on Amazon prime, so it's arriving tomorrow.
Hopefully I'll learn some useful tips before doing my Advanced Rider course in May.
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Cruizin
You will, it's a great book written by an instructor.

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phicurious86
One of my MSF instructors recommended this book, but I've never gotten around to it. Looks like an accessible and informative read.
 

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tanner68
That's a great book OP. It isn't about riding faster and smoother like the books from Ienatsch or Code. It is more like a masters thesis on road hazards. And I commend Hough for being so complete and thorough. I have read both his books. They seriously raised my awareness on so many things that would have otherwise taken years of road experience to acquire. But reading his material can be a bit of a slog at times, since he is so thorough, and we just want to read about how to go faster. And he doesn't spend much time on that. I recommend his books as well. Hough has done a great service to the riding community by printing something so thorough on road hazards and motorcycle safety.

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gregjet
Pretty hard to beat the "Twist of the Wrist" books and even better the second second video "twist of the Wrist 2" . The second one may be one of the best adult instruction videos I have ever seen.
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Cruizin
I find the twist of the wrist books good for the rider who is on his second or third year of riding.
 
This thread is for the new rider. Anybody trying to get faster in their first season is wrong, and often dead.
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mjh937
I bought this book based on @admin's recommendation. It is definitely a worthwhile read. I also bought Twist of the Wrist, not to go faster necessarily but to be practicing the correct techniques. Both were money well spent in my opinion.
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gregjet
The techniques described in "twist of the Wrist" don't necessarily make you faster ( although probably will) . They describe what NOT to do as well as what to do. The book helps stop bad habits forming in the first place. MOST of the stuff is basic mainly because most riders have ideas about how a caster steering piece machinery that is just wrong and Twist helps get these out of your head. I originally bought it for my girlfriend after she had had a huge accident and lost her confidence . She had been riding for decades and said: " I wish someone had shown me this book when I first started riding". I agree. All the proper basics for doing it right from the start. It improved my racing but it improved her ordinary riding MORE. Of course a lot of the stuff wasn't known when she started riding as most of the rider/bike physics wasn't even studied until the late 70's and most has been in the 70's, 80's and 90's. With stuff like ABS and stability control , I suspect, there will be furthur changes in techniques to optimise rider control . If non slider type forks ( in particular forks that rise under brakes instead of dive) become more common there will be even more changes.
Can't speak for the other book cause I have never seen it, but anything that helps you deconstruct you riding and reconstruct it to improve it is, worth the effort.
 
On a side note. I use parts of the video to instruct beginner  mountain bike riders in turning and braking as caster steering inline two wheeled device is a caster steering inline 2 wheeled device, and the techniques are similiar.
 
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joshg
Bought it! Looking forward to reading this on my upcoming flight.
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snowdriftless
[Heavily stepped in sarcasm]
 
In researching how to procure such a magnificent text I stumbled upon these buildings called "Libraries". These strange "Libraries" are places where people gather collections of manuscripts that are freely exchanged among those that go through an obtuse process of getting a "Library Card". I made my way to one of these "Libraries" Lo and Behold they had a copy of "Proficient Motorcycling" sitting on a shelf! What a momentous discovery!
 
[sarcasm Ending]
 
Check your local library, you may not need to buy the book and wait for delivery.

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gregjet
In Bundaberg the chances of actually having a hard copy of anything much is a bit hopeful. Unless you can get it electronically...They do have LOTS of hard copy of books on Bundaberg history though.

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ornery
Got both books from our local library, and just finished "Proficient Motorcycling".  Between that, and a recently completed safety course, the most important take away I gathered, is to ride within your limits, and leave as little to chance as possible. 
 
MC_Guides.gif
 
This is the one month anniversary of my first ride. 675 miles so far, with a LONG way to go before I'll be "proficient".
 

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grahamfz07
I just ordered a copy myself

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cavedog
I'm about halfway through, it's an excellent book.

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grahamfz07
Im just about finished the book. Definately a great resource that i will be pulling out to re-read before each riding season. I found it a great refresher from my motorcycle riding course. Thanks @admin for the suggestion

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chickenchickendinner
will add this to my reading list!

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chickenchickendinner
will add this to my reading list!

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gregjet
Can't get it Aus. looked for about half an hour.

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Mr.Puss
This really is a great read. Borrow it. Buy it. Read it.

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Guest 2wheeler
A good friend of mine is an instructor for Total Contol, and turned me on to Lee Park's book: "Total Control: High Performance Street Riding Techniques" - Great Book!
 
Definitely not a beginners book, but then again, I totally don't think that the FZ-07 is a beginner bike.
 
 
 

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Mr.Puss
Got both books from our local library, and just finished "Proficient Motorcycling".  Between that, and a recently completed safety course, the most important take away I gathered, is to ride within your limits, and leave as little to chance as possible.   
MC_Guides.gif
 
This is the one month anniversary of my first ride. 675 miles so far, with a LONG way to go before I'll be "proficient".

Have you had a chance to get into the "twist of the wrist" book yet? If so how does it compare? 

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ornery
"Twist Of The Wrist" is for experienced riders who want to get better. Way more technical info geared toward going faster. Honestly, I got more of a kick out of "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance: An Inquiry Into Values", even though it had little to do with riding actually. I think the safety aspects of the two books above could have been reduced to much shorter books, maybe even simple pamphlets filled with examples.  I learn a helluva lot about how to ride (or, not to ride), by watching YouTube motorcycle accident videos. 
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jake
Picked it up for the wife and I plan on reading it also got twist of the wrist 2 also... watched the videos but reading will help sink it in better IMO.

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