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ericpev

Wet vs Dry torque values

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ericpev
Are torque vales in the owners manual referring to tightening with some kind of lubricant (oil, loctite) or nothing at all? Thanks

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rotaryryan24
They will be dry, unless oil is called for by the picture of the little oil can. In the center of the oil can is a letter designating the type of lube to use. If you have a manual go to page 2-14 and look at the far right column under remarks.
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You do or don't
Then your dead.
 
To order a tail tidy click
One-off-fabrication.myshopify.com

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ericpev
Is that in the service manual or in the owners manual as well? I Don't have a service one but a list of values like that would be handy

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rotaryryan24
It is the service manual, there are three pages of torque values. Most chassis bolts are dry. When you get into the engine it's a different story.

You do or don't
Then your dead.
 
To order a tail tidy click
One-off-fabrication.myshopify.com

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ericpev
Thanks Ryan. Actually just bought an eBay version of the manual so all my problems should be solved haha

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USMCFieldMP
You bought an eBay version of the service manual? Or you bought a Yamaha Service Manual on eBay?
 
 
 
A lot of numbers in the cheaper manuals can, and usually are, wrong... so I'm hoping that's not the route you took.

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ericpev
Hahaha sorry. I bought a manual off of eBay. Coming from the UK as an MT-07 manual. Exactly the same right?

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USMCFieldMP
Should be. I'll bet that all the specs are in metric units though, instead of ft-lbs. And there are a few minor differences here and there between the two, nothing major though.

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rick
I'm a pretty fanatical fan of using antiseize on hardware exposed to the elements - meaning pretty much everything on a bike. Where there's a torque figure involved, I'll usually decrease that number by 25% when I've added either copper or aluminum goo to the threads. If that sounds like I've made a bolt too loose, I've seen recommendations for using as much as 40% less than the dry torque number.
 
The back wheel to my Aprilia is held on with one great big nut (22mm internal hex) with a large flange (2.5-3"). The threads are to be lightly lubed and the flange is left dry. Get out the big tools. It's put on with 125 ft-lbs. I'd guess it takes closer to 175-200 ft-lbs to break it free. It's only a guess cause I use a 3ft long pipe on a 3/4" bar

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