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ch3rryghost

Hate to put a damper on everyone's Friday...

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ch3rryghost
However, I wanted to post this link and generate discussion about more recent numbers on motorcycle crashes and fatalities. This also serves as a public reminder to myself that while it's good that my comfort level and confidence is growing on two-wheels it's important to remember and respect the relatively dangerous nature of riding a motorcycle.  
 
http://www.iii.org/issue-update/motorcycle-crashes
 
 
While I haven't had the opportunity to read the entire study in detail, this jumped out at me the most thus far: "Older motorcyclists account for more than half of all motorcyclist fatalities. NHTSA data show that in 2012, 56.0 percent of motorcyclists killed in crashes were age 40 or over, compared with 46.0 percent in 2003" 
 
I would have confidently bet a six-pack that it'd be the 20-30 year olds accounting for half of all fatalities. Naturally the following question would be "why is it that 40> year olds account for that many deaths?" Similar injuries sustained by the younger demographic but their bodies are more equip to battle/recover from it? Anyways, slow day at work, hopefully this spurs some discussion, I'd love to hear any and all feedback. 
 
Amber
 
[span style=font-size:13.3333330154419px]ALSO: As the weekend is nearly upon us, I hope people enjoy their weekend getaway rides and to be safe! [/span]

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GAZ
I always think these numbers are skewed. While I understand that gear isn't required, how many deaths could of been prevented with proper gear/helmets? You have to factor in a lot of other things when riding a motorcycle too. I think this needs to expand its results in that aspect (if even possible). What is also disgusting is how many states have 'partial law' and 'no law' for motorcycle helmets. It's 2015 and there is 3 states that still don't require a helmet to ride a motorcycle. Are you serious? There is also 28 states that have partial law which only require you to have a helmet under the age of 20 (could be as low as 17 in some states Source: here). I think there needs to be less studies about how unsafe riding a motorcycle is and more in making sure people wear the proper gear, have the training, maturity, and knowledge needed to be out on the road. To be honest this (babysitting) shouldn't need to happen, since there's other countries out there that have more two-wheeled vehicles on the road than four-wheeled, with less accidents.
 
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motomeek
Yes, I've read discussion on this article in another forum. I believe it also had to do with reaction time. Seems the older you get, the slower you are to react.

Instagram: @meekmade | You don't need to flat foot a bike to ride it.

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Guru
Statistics lol.
 
I the Upfront part the article mentions that both deaths and injuries went down. That good right?
 
I have to agree with GAZ. There are a lot of activities that are quite dangerous if not deadly of you do not know what you are doing. Even a pair of scissors can be fatal. The point is that people seem to get stupider (less responsible) and then expect that the environment changes to accommodate their stupidity. Governments have to pass laws to safeguard them. I do not believe that is the right thing to do. Less government is key to freedom. Wearing a helmet is a no brainer (pardon the pun). I don't need a law to have it enforced. If I am stupid enough to think that I am invisible, then Darwin should take care of it.
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hippiebikerchick
The average or median age of people is slowly rising so it doesn't surprise me that statistics would go that way.
 
I wish driver training would include motorcycle awareness. It seems like this state gives a licence to anybody. We have a lot of young drivers and new immigrants whose driving skills aren't very good and it can get scary out there! There seems to be a lot of personal entitlement here too. As in, I'm entitled to be a jerk on the road, my agenda is more important than yours, GTFOOTW! Also too many distractions; texting, cranky kids in car, spilling your latte.
 
As a motorcyclist I feel like I am the most mature person on the road. I definitely have more at stake so I watch out for me and everybody else. Not riding outside your skill level goes a long way toward a safe ride too.
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Illegitimi non carborundum

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she3pdog
I see a lot of guys around here wearing nothing but half shells and regular clothes. I'd say there is a fairly even spread of their ages. I agree that protecting someone from themselves is not a function of the government. I always wear motorcycle specific full face helmet, gloves, jacket, pants, and boots. It doesn't bother me if other people don't as it is their choice, but the money and possibly silly looks that I get are worth me still having skin and being alive if I fall.
 
It looks like if you wear a helmet, have a license, and don't drink and drive or speed, your chances of being in a crash decrease, and surviving one increase drastically. Having ABS seems to also be a big help.

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Riverfox
I'll just throw my two cents in. I also would've thought that the 18-25 group would have a much higher number of deaths. But after thinking about it I believe that a major factor in the higher age of motorcycle reported deaths has more to do with the "Wild Hog" syndrome.
 
With large number of more afluent men having a midlife crisis and a large saving account, we're finding that many of them are purchasing motorcycles that they really have no business being on. They learn just enough to ride them but have no desire to be proficient and aware of what to do in an emergency situation.
 
I have responded to many motorcycle accidents, both car v.s. motorcycle and motorcycle v.s. ditch and I've found the majority to have been middle to older age and totaly unable to ride in anything but a straight line on an empty and dry road. They have little to no concept how to handle their rides in an emergency maneuver. Just look at most motorcycle drivers tests given by most states. All it proves is that they can drive around in perfect conditions at low speeds. They're more interested in looking the part of biker rather than becoming a motorcyclist.
 
Just sayin!
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ch3rryghost
All very valid points. I personally don't care for statistics for the most part because they obviously don't tell the whole story but it's still a useful tool when attempting to paint a larger picture, ie, the decrease in the number of deaths.
 
It would have been helpful to have the injury/fatality rate broken down by state due to the variance in safety regulation so readers can see the disparity caused by compulsory head protection; I'm surprised that it wasn't included. Freedom from government to me only makes sense in an ideal world--a world where people are educated and make educated decisions. However, I don't trust people to do the right thing so I think government legislation is absolutely necessary when it comes to safety and education of its citizens. Not to mention the monetary burden falling on tax payers from an uninsured not wearing a helmet and everything else that goes into it. @riverfox, are you in the medical response profession? You must see some interesting things.
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mjh937
People can come up with statistics to prove anything. 14% of people know that.-- Homer Simpson.
Facts are meaningless. You could use facts to prove anything that's even remotely true! --Homer Simpson.
 
It is amazing how insightful Homer Simpson can be :).
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motomeek
That's the thing with these studies. You're right, they don't capture the whole story. And as Homer has said, they can be construed to create any outcome you'd like… Gotta watch out for bias in these things. Thanks for getting those words out. I didn't know how to phrase it earlier.
 
For example, we would assume the 18-25 age range would be higher risk, but how many actually own a bike at that age? I just turned 25 when I got my first bike because I didn't have the money/circumstances until then. I don't know about you, but my parents weren't supportive on letting me have a bike. I had to wait to move out to do that.
 
And as @hippiebikerchick has said, there are WAY more distracted drivers out there on the road… it only adds up as time goes by.
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Instagram: @meekmade | You don't need to flat foot a bike to ride it.

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Cruizin
 
They did a study recently in Idaho on motorcycle deaths. It proved that over 50% of motorcycle deaths here are middle aged men on cruisers. they often hit middle age, go buy an 800lb bike ride for a couple months around town, and then go die on scenic twisty roads because they never took a course and learned how to operate a heavy bike.
 
They also proved that most motorcyle deaths were due to rider error, with Car involved accidents only accounting for 35% of the deaths.
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Riverfox
All very valid points. I personally don't care for statistics for the most part because they obviously don't tell the whole story but it's still a useful tool when attempting to paint a larger picture, ie, the decrease in the number of deaths.  
It would have been helpful to have the injury/fatality rate broken down by state due to the variance in safety regulation so readers can see the disparity caused by compulsory head protection; I'm surprised that it wasn't included. Freedom from government to me only makes sense in an ideal world--a world where people are educated and make educated decisions. However, I don't trust people to do the right thing so I think government legislation is absolutely necessary when it comes to safety and education of its citizens. Not to mention the monetary burden falling on tax payers from an uninsured not wearing a helmet and everything else that goes into it. @riverfox, are you in the medical response profession? You must see some interesting things.
Retired law enforcement and first responder. 

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blackie74
Well I qualify as a old rider (age 74). My bet is more people over 40 own motorcycles than those 20 to 30, hence more accidents. But I also notice a lot of riders in the 40 over ride Harleys or Gold Wings and don't bother with a Helmet or other protective gear. Florida does not require helmets so more deaths when a crash happens. I see the young crowd riding sport bikes in shorts, t shirts, and flip fops , with a helmet strapped on the back??
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rick
Yeah, wouldn't be nice if those statistics were broken down a bit further from not only age, but rider experience, when they started riding in life as well as whether there was a break between that 90s vintage GS500 Suzuki and the shiny new 800 lb behemoth that scrapes the ground easily, puts yer feet in the next county and can't stop until it gets to that next county.
 
It's been some years now since PA dropped its helmet laws (it's not legal here to drive w/o a seatbelt - go figure). but I still can't get used to seeing this. I think you only have to be 18 and have 2 years on yer license to qualify for that Darwin award. After 44 years of wearing helmets, it feels really odd to go even a block w/o.
 
As for reaction times decreasing with age - sure, that's a no brainer. But I doubt it has anything to do with those statistics. At 62, I'll stack my on the bike reaction times against any 20/30 year in a car who can't put their cell phone down for a minute. But seriously, it's all about skills and experience. Anyone who skis knows that the split second your brain gets occupied with one of those nice snowy face plants, you may as well just get it over with. Experience and learned skills, from years of that experience, allows yer brain to concentrate on getting out of whatever situation, instead of that oh sh-t crash moment. Doesn't mean yer not gonna crash. It just improves yer statistics.
 
BTW, I'm a biochemist/molecular biologist and work for trauma and vascular surgeons. Let me tell you just how tired I get watching powerpoint presentations where motorcycle accidents occupy a big piece of the trauma list pie chart. Ladder falls are also up there. My boss tells me no one over 50 should ever climb one. After 23 years of working for him, we just don't talk about my riding, or my 100 year old house that puts me on ladders or my woodworking hobby - you should see the statistics on tablesaw injuries every year.
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trebec
1 in 4 fatalities were un licensed riders. That is 25% that were killed because they couldn't be bothered to get a license and learn a few things before jumping on a bike. Additionally 781 more may be alive because of helmets. To think something as simple as a helmet could save your life. I don't know about all of you but I am very partial to my helmet and refuse to ride without it. Most of these things are skewed towards a certain viewpoint but you can't really argue that a helmet is not the cheapest insurance for your head and the fact that getting licensed will help you be more aware of at least a thing or two that could save you. If I have my way everyone would be required to attend the MSF basic rider course and the advanced rider course within 3 years of having a license. I am 28 and not invincible but both of these courses have saved me more times than I can count. Had it not been for these courses I would have been involved in an accident guaranteed, and that's a fact. The things that are taught are so crucial when people don't pay attention to motorcycles.
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Follow me on Instagram. http://instagram.com/trebec

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rick
I once saw a guy lose his balance at a red light, fall straight over sideways and whack the side of his helmet on the concrete so hard it sounded like a bowling ball getting dropped from 10 feet. He got up embarrassed and little shaken, but got right up.
 
Helmets save lives. And full faced ones help protect the bits that people look at when they talk to ya. The guys who ride w/o, well I hope they never have to find that out the hard way.
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