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BruceWayne911

Rear stand recommendations

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BruceWayne911

Just bought 2019 mt-07 and decided to start investing in tools to learn how to perform maintenance. I went on pitbull.com to try and find a rear stand but there are so many different variations. Can anybody point me in the right direction for a high quality rear stand and spools?

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Yakko Warner

Let me try.

The MT-07 doesn't have threaded holes for standard spools.  You can get rear axle sliders with spools, such as:

evotech_performance_ep_yamaha_fz07_rear_

Whether you call them swingarm spools or paddock stand bobbins, Evotech Performance Swingarm Spools make...

Protect your Yamaha and allow for easy mounting on your rear stand all in one affordable unit from Womet-Tech...

or something like this will also provide spools for a rear stand:


Make precise chain adjustments and utilize the convenient built-in spools on the CNC machined black anodized AXB...

Or you can lift your rear wheel without spools, but this is less secure.

Looking at Pit Bull's rear stands for the MT-09 (which does support spools) there are four options.  A stand for spools (you can probably get a standard support for use without spools):

F0003-000.jpg

The Spooled Rear Stand lifts spool-equipped bikes. It is width adjustable to fit virtually all spool-equipped...

A stand with both standard and spool supports:

F0028-000.jpg

The SS Rear Stand can be used as a Standard or Spooled Rear Stand by flipping the top supports over. It is width...

A forward handle stand with spool supports (you can get standard supports also); a forward handle may be easier to use, but can also get in the way:

F0043-000.jpg

The Spooled Forward Handle Rear lifts spool-equipped bikes. It is width adjustable to fit virtually all sport bikes. It...

And a rear stand with an adjustable height feature. (the forward handle stand is also height adjustable):

F0082A-000.jpg

Fully Adjustable Rear Stand - height adjustable 11.75

I'd suggest getting both spool and standard supports, so you can use the spools when possible, and the standard supports when it's not (such as when removing the rear wheel, or even adjusting the chain tension).

Just my $0.02.

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seven
9 hours ago, Yakko Warner said:

I'd suggest getting both spool and standard supports, so you can use the spools when possible, and the standard supports when it's not (such as when removing the rear wheel, or even adjusting the chain tension).

Just note that the Owners Manual only tells you the chain slack measurements when on the side stand but the service manual gives you both...they are different.

From the service manual I have (no warranty expressed or implied, use at your own risk, verify with your own source of truth...)

Drive chain slack 51.0-56.0 mm (2.01-2.20 in)
Drive chain slack (Maintenance stand) 56.0-61.0 mm (2.20-2.40 in)

 

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Yakko Warner
Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, Yakko Warner said:

A forward handle stand with spool supports (you can get standard supports also); a forward handle may be easier to use, but can also get in the way:

I should add that you can turn the forward handle stand around and lift the rear with the handle facing backwards, if the handle is in the way in the forward position.

Edited by Yakko Warner
Added clarification.

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myfootisdumb

This is the one I use, don't even need the spools.. Can use it for other bikes without spools.. This stand worked for my first bike and my second bike..

X001.jpg

Pit Bull rear stands fit a variety of sport motorcycles. The Standard Rear Stand lifts non-spool equipped bikes by supporting the swingarm with rubber pads. The Pit Bull rear motorcycle stand was...

 

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klx678

I used the low buck Harbor Freight on virtually all my bikes one time or another, I got a second one because it was so good.

I put a set of the Gilles chain adjuster/stand spool parts on my bike and had to go to the Harbor Freight aluminum stand, because the other with a set of spool forks was too tall.  It took a lot of effort raising the rear too high for ease of use.   The HF aluminum stand was only around $40, the low buck one was around $30.

Of course this doesn't mean much if you aren't in the U.S.  Maybe consider putting the country where you are in your signature so you can make sure to get accurate help and information.

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Devilman
On 5/5/2021 at 11:31 AM, seven said:

Just note that the Owners Manual only tells you the chain slack measurements when on the side stand but the service manual gives you both...they are different.

From the service manual I have (no warranty expressed or implied, use at your own risk, verify with your own source of truth...)

Drive chain slack 51.0-56.0 mm (2.01-2.20 in)
Drive chain slack (Maintenance stand) 56.0-61.0 mm (2.20-2.40 in)

 

I don't think that matters but I could be wrong. If it's on a side stand vs a maint stand the weight is the same on the swing arms since it is not independent to one another. If you have someone sit on it while doing it (far fetched) the shock is compressed and the swing arm would be higher and tighten the chain.

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Devilman

Pitbull stands are great if you are using them a lot but my Venom stand works quite well with no wiggling. I have the spool attachments and the L-bend for it so I can raise my Rebel 500 (non-spooled). Had it for over a year and no issues.

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seven
13 hours ago, Devilman said:

I don't think that matters but I could be wrong. If it's on a side stand vs a maint stand the weight is the same on the swing arms since it is not independent to one another. If you have someone sit on it while doing it (far fetched) the shock is compressed and the swing arm would be higher and tighten the chain.

Yeah I haven't really compared the difference but that is what it says in the service manual.

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DewMan
15 hours ago, Devilman said:

I don't think that matters but I could be wrong. If it's on a side stand vs a maint stand the weight is the same on the swing arms since it is not independent to one another. If you have someone sit on it while doing it (far fetched) the shock is compressed and the swing arm would be higher and tighten the chain.

When the bike is on the side stand, part of the weight is supported by the side stand. When on service/paddock stand all the rear weight is supported by the swingarm most likely causing a bit more shock compression raising the swingarm a little more.

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DewMan
 
Just shut up and ride.

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seven
13 minutes ago, DewMan said:

When the bike is on the side stand, part of the weight is supported by the side stand. When on service/paddock stand all the rear weight is supported by the swingarm most likely causing a bit more shock compression raising the swingarm a little more.

This was my thought too, and the differences are pretty small at 5mm.

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klx678

I would think with the "maintenance stand" if it was using the swing arm for support, it would have the smaller amount of slack since it would have the swing arm closer to the tightest portion of the arc when the counter shaft, swing arm pivot, and rear axle are in line.

Regardless, I'd go with the looser of the two, just because it is better to be looser than tight.   You don't damage parts if the chain is a bit loose, but you can if it is tight.

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ducarmont
17 hours ago, klx678 said:

I would think with the "maintenance stand" if it was using the swing arm for support, it would have the smaller amount of slack since it would have the swing arm closer to the tightest portion of the arc when the counter shaft, swing arm pivot, and rear axle are in line.

Regardless, I'd go with the looser of the two, just because it is better to be looser than tight.   You don't damage parts if the chain is a bit loose, but you can if it is tight.

So, I was curious about this too; also since setting the correct tension while on the 'maintenance stand' (rear stand lifting the swingarm, in my case) didn't correlate to the correct tension after lowering the bike onto the side stand. 

I don't know if Yamaha gives a definition of 'maintenance stand' in the service manual (I'll go out to my garage and check when I have a chance), but I'm thinking they mean a center stand / lift type stand, not paddock stand, which would also correlate to the looser spec with the rear unsupported.

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klx678

My thoughts too.   I saw some pictures of an XSR on a stand that supported it like a center stand would.

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D.A.
Posted (edited)
On 5/5/2021 at 11:31 AM, seven said:

... the Owners Manual only tells you the chain slack measurements when on the side stand but the service manual gives you both...they are different.

From the service manual I have...

Drive chain slack 51.0-56.0 mm (2.01-2.20 in)
Drive chain slack (Maintenance stand) 56.0-61.0 mm (2.20-2.40 in)

Interesting. What version of the service manual do you have? 

Yamaha must have updated that info at some point. I have a few different versions of the Owners Manuals. They all say “side-stand” and 51.0-56.0 mm. And I have the 2014 MT-07 Service Manual which says “suitable stand” with “rear wheel elevated” and 51.0-56.0 mm.

I had wondered about the discrepancy!

From 2014 MT-07 factory Service Manual:

7B9B078D-2B1B-4018-B293-A09153F792A8.thumb.jpeg.563f1b534f80026b9554171af7922170.jpeg

Edited by D.A.

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ducarmont

2019 manual

Its been super helpful for a lot of things, but the vagueness in “maintenance stand” and how to measure slack or alignment bothers me.  


I’ve worked on basically all my cars, so I’m fairly confident I can tackle whatever, but I’m also quite anal and new to motorcycles (kinda, only owned one other and didn’t have to maintain it).  
 

How hard do I press down on the chain when measuring? What is a “maintenance stand” (guessing it’s a center stand / lift of some sort given higher slack spec)? Can I use the hashes on the swingarm (of course Yamaha says yes, but internet and at least seemingly reputable mechanics say no...)?  

Am I overthinking it? Yes, probably. 

I did order one of those motion pro alignment rod things, don’t have it yet though
 

 

1480F777-0743-4C97-A842-4F4A0731889D.jpeg

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D.A.
13 minutes ago, ducarmont said:

...How hard do I press down on the chain when measuring?...

Only publication I have seen that mentions pressure is the 2014 UK-version MT-07 OWNERS manual:

12D561E1-9992-43A3-8FE9-B40EF143402D.thumb.jpeg.7f0200db05998b0a35a0556443426f23.jpeg

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DewMan

I just pull down with firm pressure to make sure I'm gathering all the slack to that side of the sprockets. It's not like excessive force applied by hand will stretch the chain any further.  👍

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DewMan
 
Just shut up and ride.

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D.A.
Posted (edited)

When doing a track day, they make you loosen your chain so much it feels like you could lift it off the rear sprocket with no effort whatsoever!

But I’ve ridden with it that way all day and my bike didn’t spontaneously combust so I’m guessing there’s quite a bit of leeway in terms of how loose it can be. Just as long as it’s not too tight. 

Edited by D.A.
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klx678
Posted (edited)

Like I said, chains are made to run without any tension, better loose than too tight.   If there is less slack than is needed when the swing arm arc gets to the max distance, something's got to start to give way - the chain, the bearings, something.  I figure if long travel off roader can run with as much slack as they have, my street bike can run with an extra few mm of slack.

 

By the way, the stand I saw must have been something like this one from Abba Stands:

abba-superbike-stand-01.jpg

It would require taking off the plastic side covers, no big deal.  I'm thinking I could make something like this if I find a friend that can weld.

Edited by klx678

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FZ not MT
Posted (edited)

Hey has anyone had any experience with the Dynamoto stands? I discovered them recently and depending on your needs, these could be awesome. They are pricey though - around $600. They allow you to rotate your bike 360 degrees on a dime. Watch the video on the second link to see how cool this setup is.

https://www.dynamotousa.com/products/yamaha-front-and-rear-stand-set

https://www.dynamotousa.com/

 

Edited by FZ not MT

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M. Hausknecht

You'll need to add spools to use that rear stand. Unless the "turn on a dime" is imperative for you, you can't beat Pit Bull; and they have great resale value. Get the front end stand that lifts from the lower triple tree so you can pull your forks when necessary.

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Yakko Warner
1 hour ago, FZ not MT said:

Hey has anyone had any experience with the Dynamoto stands? I discovered them recently and depending on your needs, these could be awesome. They are pricey though - around $600. They allow you to rotate your bike 360 degrees on a dime.

For $610 you could get a Bursig stand (if it were in stock someplace).

bursig_center_lift_stand.jpg

When garage space is valuable, every inch matters. The Bursig Center-Lift Stand quickly and efficiently lifts your...
bursig_adapter_plate.jpg

Made from laser-cut galvanized steel, the Bursig Adapter Plates are manufactured specifically for each bike to allow...

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DewMan
16 hours ago, Yakko Warner said:

For $610 you could get a Bursig stand (if it were in stock someplace).

bursig_center_lift_stand.jpg

When garage space is valuable, every inch matters. The Bursig Center-Lift Stand quickly and efficiently lifts your...
bursig_adapter_plate.jpg

Made from laser-cut galvanized steel, the Bursig Adapter Plates are manufactured specifically for each bike to allow...

For $610 I could pay a burly man to pick up the  bike and hold while I worked on it.  😆

I'll stick to my set of $120 Venom front and rear paddock stands.

 

 

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DewMan
 
Just shut up and ride.

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