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XATTILAX

What torque force is required for frame sliders on the side of the engine

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XATTILAX

What torque force is required for frame sliders on the side of the engine ?

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Pursuvant
Posted (edited)

Page 5-14 Service manual, 55 ft-lbs for the (frame sliders) engine mount bolts into cylinder. A dab of anti-seize seems a good idea.

If you do use anti-seize, back the torque off 20%, and check them once a week for a few. If they loosen, give em just a bit more torque

Edited by Pursuvant
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XATTILAX
22 minutes ago, Pursuvant said:

Page 5-14 Service manual, 55 ft-lbs for the (frame sliders) engine mount bolts into cylinder. A dab of anti-seize seems a good idea

I cant find that page do you mind sending a picture??

Also just to make sure we are talking about the same thing here is a picture image.png.2ad1f68c98d5260ef6ed508f2dadede7.png

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XATTILAX

I found this picture too I'm not sure which one is which????

 

 

 

image.png.2982fbc55021070bd27a245f410ec58b.pngI fo

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XATTILAX
34 minutes ago, Pursuvant said:

Page 5-14 Service manual, 55 ft-lbs for the (frame sliders) engine mount bolts into cylinder. A dab of anti-seize seems a good idea.

If you do use anti-seize, back the torque off 20%, and check them once a week for a few. If they loosen, give em just a bit more torque

what do you mean why do i need anti seize 

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Pursuvant

Anti-seize is used to protect /prevent dissimilar metals from reacting to each other. They can trade electrons and you can get a "cold weld" - siezures, and not be able to remove bolts later. Many metals in close proximity plus heat, pressure, moisture, stress can react with each other.

Steel bolt in aluminum cylinder under heat cycling, stress, weather, both bolt and cylinder can be protected with anti-seize

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D.A.
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, XATTILAX said:

... just to make sure we are talking about the same thing here is a picture ...

Yes, you circled the correct mounting hole in your photo. 

1 hour ago, XATTILAX said:

I found this picture too I'm not sure which one is which????

Use the OES sliders bolts (and washers) to replace the ones circled in red in the diagram below:

C3BFB249-D561-44AF-BD9C-24D93BEAA6A1.jpeg
 

CEDE4D65-1266-445B-B966-34F650A8ADC4.thumb.jpeg.cbfeba3cb5e96e79e82fd9e1ee8edff8.jpeg
 

Note: My diagrams are from the factory service manual for the 2014 EU-version MT-07. 

Edited by D.A.
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XATTILAX
1 hour ago, D.A. said:

Yes, you circled the correct mounting hole in your photo. 

Use the OES sliders bolts (and washers) to replace the ones circled in red in the diagram below:

C3BFB249-D561-44AF-BD9C-24D93BEAA6A1.jpeg
 

CEDE4D65-1266-445B-B966-34F650A8ADC4.thumb.jpeg.cbfeba3cb5e96e79e82fd9e1ee8edff8.jpeg
 

Note: My diagrams are from the factory service manual for the 2014 EU-version MT-07. 

Ok so now that I know that I selected the right spot should I use that anti seize stuff ! Also should I use 75NM of torque like rated or should it be lower since I’m adding extra parts that makes it thicker and a bit more distant ? Like 50NM or something not to sure what do you guys think ? 

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D.A.
Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, XATTILAX said:

... should I use that anti seize stuff ! Also should I use 75NM of torque like rated or should it be lower since I’m adding extra parts that makes it thicker and a bit more distant ? ...

It's up to you whether or not you want to use anti-seize.

If you DON'T, you run the risk of the OES bolts cold-welding themselves to the engine. If that happens, you will have an excruciatingly difficult time removing them in the future if, for instance, you drop the bike and want to replace a slider.

On the other hand, if you DO use the ant-seize, you should reduce the torque, since using the normal dry torque amount on a bolt with anti-seize can over-tighten it, deforming (and thereby ruining) the threads on either the bolt or the engine case or both. AND as suggested by @Pursuvant, you should double-check the tightness of those bolts occasionally because not only does anti-seize prevent different metals from seizing together, it also (unfortunately) acts as a bit of a lubricant. And I'm sure you can envision why lubricated engine mount bolts might be problematic on a motorcycle.

I used to have OES frame sliders on my FZ and when I did, I was more concerned with the former issue so I put a very light coating of anti-seize on the bolt threads and reduced the recommended torque by 20%. I used 60Nm (since 75Nm -20% = 60Nm). (Technically I used 43 ft-lbs since my torque wrench is calibrated in foot pounds.) The sliders stayed secure on my bike. However, I later removed them and mounted an Impaktech crash cage instead and it did become loose once. I continued to use anti-seize but increased the torque to 49 ft-lbs and that seemed to work fine.

And no, if you are using dry engine bolts you should not reduce torque nor add extra torque to compensate for the added length and mass of something as light OES sliders. Tighten to 75Nm. No more. No less. If you use anti-seize, reduce torque by 20% and only increase that if the bolts won't stay tight after riding the bike.

There's no situation where you should need more than 75Nm. Yamaha (and in this scenario, OES) select bolts strong enough to do the job at hand using fasteners made of metal alloys rated for specific loads, with "loads" referring to tightening force, not the weight of the objects being fastened together. Meaning that even if the frame sliders weighed 1000-lbs each, if the bolts attaching them are rated for 75Nm of torque, adding more torque will do nothing other than destroy the bolts.

With all of that said, I am not a professional mechanic so as @Pursuvant often says, taking my advice could result in your death. (I'm paraphrasing here.)

In my opinion you would be wise to consult your dad before making these types of decisions.

Edited by D.A.
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XATTILAX

I picked this up at auto zone is this good ? 

image.jpg

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D.A.
20 minutes ago, XATTILAX said:

I picked this up at auto zone is this good ? 

Yes, that should work fine. 

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Julian
Posted (edited)

I got my frame sliders today and the bolt they come with has a hex head (10mm). How can hex head bolts be tightened to the correct torque? Are there hex inserts for torque wench? I tried a search but without much success. 

Edited by Julian

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Loch
1 hour ago, Julian said:

I got my frame sliders today and the bolt they come with has a hex head (10mm). How can hex head bolts be tightened to the correct torque? Are there hex inserts for torque wench? I tried a search but without much success. 

Is this what you mean?

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B08Q4BJRLY

 

You can find these in 1/4-3/8-1/2" drive, depending on your ratchet size. Quick Google search for "1/2 hex bit metric" or likewise will bring up a bunch of options

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mjh937
12 hours ago, Julian said:

I got my frame sliders today and the bolt they come with has a hex head (10mm). How can hex head bolts be tightened to the correct torque? Are there hex inserts for torque wench? I tried a search but without much success. 

I got a hex head for my torque wrench from either Lowes or Harbor Freight, I do not remember which but I am sure they both have them if you do not want to wait for it to ship from somewhere. 

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Julian

None of those stores are present in Switzerland but knowing that hex heads are not uncommon I'm sure I'll find it eventually.

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Julian

I was advised that the bike should be upright (not on the side stand) and the engine supported when installing the frame sliders. Is that a valid concern? 

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JeffL

I installed my sliders with just the side stand. Make sure you do one at a time.

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Julian

I installed the frame sliders a while ago, here are a couple of pictures. BTW they get pretty hot to the touch after riding even a short distance, is that expected? 

20210801_165102.thumb.jpg.56fd09861590dd02da9f5a6684edf98c.jpg

20210801_165108.jpg

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