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firstyammerha

fun with new IR thermal gun

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firstyammerha

Always wondered about the operating temperature of a shock so after a 20 odd mile ride today in 75F temps and little traffic out here in the country, I took the new $25 Harbor Freight IR temp reading  gun out and pointed it at the body of my stock shock and from about a foot away I got a reading of 113F. This is a re-sprung shock so I'm sure it's cycling back and forth more actively than it did with the stock spring. The roads I use are paved and smooth so the shock isn't getting a work out like an MX shock would.  Wish I had this tool when I was racing because it would have given me some good info. Gun in hand, I also pointed it at the radiator and got a reading of 169F  a few minutes later. I can't recall the radiator fan cycling on and off or engine warning lights illuminating even in the 95F summer weather we get down here. I'll check radiator temps next summer but the FZ09  that I rode for awhile would cycle its fan really often. I did watch my fluid levels on that FZ09 because of this but never had any low levels show. Thought I'd post this in case anyone else has this question in their mind. 

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blackout
16 hours ago, firstyammerha said:

Always wondered about the operating temperature of a shock so after a 20 odd mile ride today in 75F temps and little traffic out here in the country, I took the new $25 Harbor Freight IR temp reading  gun out and pointed it at the body of my stock shock and from about a foot away I got a reading of 113F. This is a re-sprung shock so I'm sure it's cycling back and forth more actively than it did with the stock spring. The roads I use are paved and smooth so the shock isn't getting a work out like an MX shock would.  Wish I had this tool when I was racing because it would have given me some good info. Gun in hand, I also pointed it at the radiator and got a reading of 169F  a few minutes later. I can't recall the radiator fan cycling on and off or engine warning lights illuminating even in the 95F summer weather we get down here. I'll check radiator temps next summer but the FZ09  that I rode for awhile would cycle its fan really often. I did watch my fluid levels on that FZ09 because of this but never had any low levels show. Thought I'd post this in case anyone else has this question in their mind. 

Are you thinking the temperature rose from shock cycling or heat absorption from being mounted directly to the engine?


Craig Mapstone
Upstate New York

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firstyammerha

I thought about the location of the shock but it seems like there is adequate space above and around  the engine/transmission  casting to allow for good air flow so I don't think the shock is absorbing much heat from this area. I was thinking that the shock cycling would be the big source of heat. The shock body is aluminum so I believe it acts as a good  radiator. Also, since this is a street bike, I don't think the slow  cycling through a 3" or less stroke  of the shock internals is a cause for concern. A MX bike would be a different story though. You know those shock internals cycle through a greater speed range with full extension to total collapse many times a lap. Maybe somebody with an MX or other off road  bike will buy one of these guns and give us some feedback? Curious minds need to know! Correction: the stock shock body is steel so it won't transmit any heat as well as an aluminum one. Also, my bike has the side panels removed so air flow to the shock area has to be better than stock. My opinion, shock temperature should not be any concern with our bikes. 

Edited by firstyammerha
correction

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