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noodles

How to: Valve check and adjustment

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noodles
Posted (edited)

DISCLAIMER

This was a summary of my experience following the shop manual. You should know that this is a procedure with major potential for damaging your engine if you do this incorrectly. What follows is intended to supplement the shop manual, not replace it. The shop manual is absolutely required for this service as it provides exact steps necessary and corresponding torque values for fasteners and heaps of other useful bits of information and helpful diagrams.

Perform this service at your own risk.

 

You should be familiar with taking apart your bike for other service before you begin.

You should have a firm grasp of how an engine's valve train works to understand what you are doing and why.

 

Tools/supplies you'll need:

  • Yamaha's FZ07 factory service manual
  • 7.48mm OD valve shims - buy a kit or exchange shims with a dealer/shop
    • I used a Hot Cams HCSHIM01 kit. Amazon will say it doesn't fit an FZ07 and they are wrong.
  • 1/4" drive torque wrench
  • 3mm trimmed hex key for cam chain tensioner
  • 2.5mm - 14mm hex drivers or keys
  • 8mm - 13mm box wrenches
  • 8mm - 19mm sockets
  • 14mm deep socket for spark plugs
  • 19mm socket for crankshaft nut (same size as front axle)
  • 1/4" socket extensions, wobble
  • Extendable magnet to pull spark plugs
  • New cam chain tensioner gasket (if you want)
  • New valve cover rubber gasket (if you damage the original one)
  • Feeler gauges
  • Vessel to contain drained coolant
  • Big ass pliers for the coolant pipe spring clamps
  • Philips screwdriver for worm hose clamps
  • Plastic zip ties
  • Air compressor to blow spark plug wells clean (optional)
  • Funnel (optional if you're brave)
  • Gasket sealant or grease (optional if your gasket behaves and stays in place)

Procedure

  1. Drain coolant. Allow the coolant to drain while you complete the next steps.
  2. Remove plastic body work.
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  3. Remove gas tank fasteners (1, 2), breather hoses (3), and front electronic sensor connection (4)
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  4. Lift up gas tank to remove fuel pump connector (1), then lift and rotate gas tank counter clockwise and rest on cardboard on the frame. Rest the aluminum bendy tabs back where they were fastened, and the black steel portion on the cardboard. Whatever direction you twist it, be sure that when you replace it, you twist the opposite direction. You could remove the tank if you'd like but that requires removing the fuel line from the tank.
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  5. Now that the coolant has drained, replace the drain bolt and begin removing the radiator. Remove the fairings, radiator guard (if equipped), and the single bolt on the throttle side (1). The radiator hands on 1 rubber grommet on the clutch side, 1 rubber grommet near the triple tree, and the single bolt you just removed. There's an inlet hose on the top clutch side, an outlet hose on the bottom throttle side, and the small overflow line near the cap. Remove each of these lines however you wish - I removed the bike-side connections for each hose, not the radiator-side, but it doesn't really matter. Remove the horn's electrical connections (2), and the fan motor connection (3). The radiator probably has some residual coolant left, be ready with paper towels. Gently place it on some cardboard with the hose connections facing up (4).
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  6. Remove the clutch cable guide (1).
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  7. You're now ready to remove the spark plugs. Unplug each coil (1) and tape each plug to the frame so you remember which side is which! Pull the coils by hand only. Then pull the plugs using a 14mm deep socket and wobble extensions. When removing the coils and plugs, mark on a big sheet of cardboard which coil is which (2) so you know it all goes back together when it was removed from. If you're doing this service, I hope you've removed them once already and left yourself some silicone grease or similar on the rubber boot seal so they're not so hard to remove.
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  8. Remove the crankcase breather hose (1).
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  9. Remove valve cover bolts in a criss-cross pattern (1). Zip tie various wiring harnesses, cables, etc out of the way before you begin. Then wiggle and lever out the valve cover without damaging the rubber gasket (2). Place the valve cover gasket side up on cardboard.
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  10. Remove the crankshaft end cover with 14mm hex driver, and remove riming mark access cover (1). Use 19mm socket and turn crankshaft counter clockwise until timing mark on flywheel aligns with mark on crankcase cover (2), and marks on intake cam sprocket (3) and exhaust cam sprocket (4) all align. Your engine should now be in the service position for valve check and adjustment. DO NOT TURN THE CRANKSHAFT ONCE YOU REMOVE THE CAM CHAIN TENSIONER. THIS WILL MISTIME YOUR ENGINE AND YOU WILL HAVE TO RETIME IT. By having 4 known reference points, the engine can be timed correctly if you make a mistake - ask me how I know. The reference points are, in order of verification: 1. timing mark on flywheel/crankcase (crankshaft position), 2. piston #1 (clutch side) at TDC of compression stroke (you can place something gently through spark plug hole to rest on the piston crown and turn the engine to visualize the peak of travel when the timing mark is aligned incidating TDC of compression stroke), 3. the intake camshaft timing alignment mark (parallel with head edge), 4. the exhaust camshaft alignment mark (parallel with head edge).
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  11. Now you're ready to begin checking the valve clearances. If you haven't done so already, plug the spark plug holes and the coolant output hose (1). Note that the lobes of piston #1 (clutch side) are not engaging the valve lifters ("buckets") at all. Slide the feeler gauges between the buckets and the cam lobes to measure the clearance (2). Intake should be 0.11-0.20 mm, exhaust should be 0.24-0.30 mm. You're looking for something between "no-go" and "slides right through". The gauge should kind of "stick" in-between the two. You'll "feel" what I mean - that's why they're called feeler gauges. Begin writing these down on a diagram that is explicitly clear which piston is which, and which valve is which. When you're sure of the measurement, rotate the crankshaft 270 degrees counter clockwise and measure piston #2. You could use one of those paper angle wheels or if you're like me you don't have one. I just very gently placed a long hex wrench through the spark plug hole onto the piston crown and rotated what felt like 270 degrees until I saw the piston's peak of travel visualized by the hex wrench beginning to go back down (3). If you do this do not let the angle of the hex wrench catch underneath the camshaft caps! Measure the clearance just as piston #1 and record. If your valves are all within spec, you're done! Put everything back together by following the steps in reverse order. If not, proceed to adjustment.
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Edited by noodles
try spoiler tags to cut down on length..
  • Thanks 4

his face seems pulled and tense
like he's riding on a motorbike in the strongest winds

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noodles

Adjustment

  1. Before beginning, your engine should be stone cold and in the service position with all marks aligned as detailed above. Recheck your valve clearances and be sure your measurements are correct. Annotate your findings as detailed above. Draw out a diagram of all eight valves separated by piston side and exhaust/intake side, and left/right side. Yamaha's suggestion is below (1).
    1. image.png.a9dcfcbab605515c302a305d6322dec7.png
  2. Calculate the hypothetical shim adjustment value. We will add this to the actual shim that's under the bucket to get the new shim size. An example is in the diagram above.
    1. Measured shim value - desired clearance = hypothetical shim adjustment
  3. Now we have to remove the cam chain tensioner, the cam chain, the camshafts, the valve lifters and shims, measure the shims, and replace the shims with the new correct shims. Begin by using a zip tie or mechanic's wire to secure the cam chain to the frame so it doesn't fall into the crankcase (1).
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  4. Remove the cam chain tensioner next. Begin by removing the cover bolt on the cam chain tensioner (1). Then insert a 3mm hex key and begin twisting counter clockwise until it can't be turned anymore (2). This will retract the cam chain tensioner back into itself so that it relieves pressure applied to the cam chain. The hex key stays in the tensioner during this process. If it is removed, the tensioner will immediately SNAP back out, so keep the hex key in place! You might need a trimmed or short key to accomplish this (see the thread linked above), because the airbox will be in your way as you try to unfasten the 2 hex bolts that hold the tensioner onto the block, so you have to use a hex key instead of a ratchet + socket. But then the arm of the hex key can't reach over the inserted 3mm hex key unless the 3mm is trimmed down. Also, even when wound back completely, the tensioner will still be in contact with the chain, pressing back on the tensioner. That means as you remove the bolts, they may be under some tension. Take your time and don't force anything. Once you have the tensioner off the block, rest it gently on something soft and use a careful touch with the gasket if you plan on reusing it.
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  5. REMINDER do NOT move the crankshaft now that the cam chain tensioner has been removed. If you do, the cam chain will skip teeth, moving the crankshaft out of time from the valve train.
  6. Mark the chain pins and sprocket teeth with corresponding witness marks (1, 2). Double check all 3 timing marks before you do this. This will be your target when reassembling.
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  7. Begin removing the cam caps (1). Start with the intake cap, then the exhaust cap. Remove the bolts in a crisscross order working from the outside inwards. Crack the bolt loose then move on to the next diagonally. Then return to the first side and crack that one loose, go diagonally to the other side, then crack the middle bolt on the opposite side from where you started, then get the last one. I removed the bolts evenly, about 1/2 turn at a time for each bolt following that pattern. I'm not sure if that level of detail is necessary, but I can say you definitely need to be even removing the bolts. You want to avoid the cap bending at all. A bent cap will apply uneven pressure to the camshaft journals and ruin the camshaft and thus the engine.
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  8. Remove the cam chain from the sprockets - make sure it is fastened to the frame so it doesn't fall into the crankcase! Then remove the camshafts and put them on something soft (1, 2).
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  9. Now the valve lifters are exposed (1). Stuff a rag into the cam chain area to avoid anything falling into the crankcase (2). Identify the valve shims that need to be replaced. Work one valve at a time to avoid messing up which shim came from where. Pull the valve lifter and valve shim out with an extendable magnet (3). It should capture both the lifter and the shim. Be very, very careful that the shim does not fall into the engine - plug everything up!
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  10. Working one valve at a time, take out the shim from the follower. The shims probably have the measurement laser etched into them, but you should still check with your calipers (1). Record the measurement of the existing shim into your diagram from earlier.
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  11. Now that you've measured the existing incorrectly sized shim, calculate the new shim size (1,2). Add the hypothetical shim adjustment value calculated before to the measured shim size to get the correct shim size. Round it if necessary to get a size you actually have using the table below or your own judgement. When making this adjustment, bear in mind that you should be adjusting to the higher (looser) end of the specification range. The valve train will wear over time and make the clearance smaller and smaller until you need to do this again. Do yourself a favor and don't adjust the valve clearance to the smaller (tighter) end of the specification.
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    2. (Measured clearance - Desired clearance) + Installed shim size = new shim size
  12. Coat the new valve shim with assembly lube (1) - the red stuff, technically speaking molybdenum disulfide based lubricant. Install the shim in the depression on the valve making absolutely sure the shim is in place square, not crooked (2). You'll feel it click into place. Coat the valve lifter ("bucket") with engine oil and replace over the shim you just installed. Then move on to the next valve that needs attention, repeating the process you just followed.
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  13. When you're done replacing the valve shims, it's time to replace the camshafts, cam caps, cam chain, and cam chain tensioner. Then you'll check your work by rotating the engine, rechecking the clearances, and if you're satisfied, button it all back up. Start that process by placing the camshafts back where you found them. Begin with the exhaust camshaft (1). Put the timing mark parallel with the cylinder head again. Grab the chain and drape it over the sprocket, matching the witness marks you made on the chain pin and tooth. Two things are important here: 1. You need to make sure the chain is as tight as possible on the exhaust side while draping the chain over the exhaust camshaft sprocket; and 2. do not pull the chain hard enough to move the crankshaft! These are competing goals, so take your time here and be sure the marks all line up. Remember that the cam chain tensioner can only apply tension on one side (the intake side) of the cam chain, so that's why we are pulling the exhaust side tight without moving the crankshaft.
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  14. Coat the camshaft cap journals and the camshaft journals with assembly lube (1,2 - ignore that the intake cam is in place in this photo!). Coat the cap bolts in engine oil. Replace the exhaust camshaft cap, pressing gently until the cap snaps into place. Be very careful placing the bolts into their holes, taking care not to drop them into the crankcase! Tighten the camshaft cap from the inside out (the opposite of when we removed it), tightening in stages so that it is evenly applied. Be sure your witness marks are aligned! It is very important that the caps are torqued evenly and properly. I finger-tightened them 1/2 turn at a time following the crisscross pattern described in the last post until they were all finger-tight. Then I got the 1/4" torque wrench and continued turning each 1/2 turn until they were all torqued properly. The mistake to be made here is unevenly tightening the caps and warping them slightly. My intake cap was actually slightly warped from the factory, but I compensated by tightening the lifted side an extra full turn before resuming the gradual 1/2 turn process. The cap bolts for both sides are to be torqued to 10Nm or 7.2 lbft.
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  15. Install the intake camshaft, aligning the markings with the cylinder head edge (1). Again drape the chain over top of the sprocket, aligning your witness marks. Zip tie the chain to the intake sprocket by putting a tie through the holes in the sprocket. This is to ensure the chain doesn't skip as the intake cap and cam chain tensioner are being installed. Do not forget to cut these off when you're done, and when you do, do not let the tie fall into the crankcase!
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  16. Replace the cam chain tensioner. It should still have the hex key inserted all the way, retracting the tensioner into itself. If it isn't retract it now by inserting a trimmed-down 3mm hex key and turning it counter clockwise until it stops (1). Make sure the gasket is attached with the protruding tab facing upwards and insert it into the block. Replace the 5mm hex bolts and begin tightening them down while the key is still inserted into the tensioner. Tighten them both to 10Nm or 7.2lbft.
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  17. When you're certain the cap bolts are all torqued properly and that the alignment marks and witness marks are all aligned, go ahead and pull the hex key out. This will snap the actuator forward, tensioning the chain. This is what the zip ties were for. Once it's snapped out, cut the zip ties around the sprockets while holding the tie so they don't fall into the engine. Hopefully your chain didn't skip any teeth. Now that the camshafts are installed, the camshaft caps are installed, the cam chain tensioner is installed, and all of the marks are aligned, we can rotate the engine counter clockwise again. Turn it over maybe 5 times to spread the assembly lube and seat all of the parts. Now remeasure your clearances using the steps you followed earlier. The clearances should be as you calculated them unless you made a mistake measuring the first time. If something is wrong, now is the time to disassemble and make it right. If the clearances are as expected, turn the engine over a few more times until you're satisfied, and replace everything you removed.
  18. When replacing the valve cover, having all of the wiring zip tied up to the frame really helps. I had to dab some grease into the channel molded into the valve cover to get the gasket to stay put in the cover while finagling the cover over the head again. If you do this, apply it sparingly and wipe off any excess that smushes out of the sides. You should use gasket sealer to do this but I didn't want the rubber to stick permanently. To be clear, do not put any sealant between the rubber gasket and the cylinder head! That interface should be bone dry and clean. You'll have to push in one end of the cover, then pivot up the other end of the cover up and over the camshaft caps. The crankcase breather hose connection is a real bitch because it interferes with the useless long bolts on the ECU tray above the engine. Wear some gloves. When it's time to tighten the valve cover, tighten in stages to 10Nm or 7.2 lbft.
  19. Reinstall the crankshaft end cover making sure the rubber O-ring is clean (10Nm or 7.2lbft), and the timing mark access bolt (15Nm or 11lbft). Install the cam chain cover bolt (7Nm or 5.1lbft).
  20. Replace everything else you took off. Remember to twist your gas tank back the way it came, and don't forget to plug in the fuel pump, the air sensor (the plug on the front of the gas tank), the fan motor, and the ignition coils back to their original places.

You just saved a few hundred bucks, and more importantly, you've earned your man card. Have a beer (or 4) to celebrate!


his face seems pulled and tense
like he's riding on a motorbike in the strongest winds

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noodles

I really took my time doing this and tried to document it as best I could. I hope this helps someone. If you've read this far, you should know that I'm not an expert so I apologize if I got something wrong above - hence the disclaimer at the start.

But I did follow the manual to the letter, and my machine did indeed start up and runs just fine after the procedure. I will say that I actually screwed up and turned the crankshaft before I put the chain tensioner on (like an idiot!), so I had to retime the engine using the alignment marks without the aid of my witness marks. But my motor didn't blow up in the end!

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his face seems pulled and tense
like he's riding on a motorbike in the strongest winds

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Cruizin
1 hour ago, noodles said:

I really took my time doing this and tried to document it as best I could. I hope this helps someone. If you've read this far, you should know that I'm not an expert so I apologize if I got something wrong above - hence the disclaimer at the start.

But I did follow the manual to the letter, and my machine did indeed start up and runs just fine after the procedure. I will say that I actually screwed up and turned the crankshaft before I put the chain tensioner on (like an idiot!), so I had to retime the engine using the alignment marks without the aid of my witness marks. But my motor didn't blow up in the end!

Im making you a free premium member for doing this, thank you so very much! Great job! 

  • Like 1

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