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noodles

How to: FZ-07 MT-07 Valve check and adjustment

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noodles

Adjustment

  1. Before beginning, your engine should be stone cold and in the service position with all marks aligned as detailed above. Recheck your valve clearances and be sure your measurements are correct. Annotate your findings as detailed above. Draw out a diagram of all eight valves separated by piston side and exhaust/intake side, and left/right side. Yamaha's suggestion is below (1).
    1. image.png.a9dcfcbab605515c302a305d6322dec7.png
  2. Calculate the hypothetical shim adjustment value. We will add this to the actual shim that's under the bucket to get the new shim size. An example is in the diagram above.
    1. Measured shim value - desired clearance = hypothetical shim adjustment
  3. Now we have to remove the cam chain tensioner, the cam chain, the camshafts, the valve lifters and shims, measure the shims, and replace the shims with the new correct shims. Begin by using a zip tie or mechanic's wire to secure the cam chain to the frame so it doesn't fall into the crankcase (1).
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  4. Remove the cam chain tensioner next. Begin by removing the cover bolt on the cam chain tensioner (1). Then insert a 3mm hex key and begin twisting counter clockwise until it can't be turned anymore (2). This will retract the cam chain tensioner back into itself so that it relieves pressure applied to the cam chain. The hex key stays in the tensioner during this process. If it is removed, the tensioner will immediately SNAP back out, so keep the hex key in place! You might need a trimmed or short key to accomplish this (see the thread linked above), because the airbox will be in your way as you try to unfasten the 2 hex bolts that hold the tensioner onto the block, so you have to use a hex key instead of a ratchet + socket. But then the arm of the hex key can't reach over the inserted 3mm hex key unless the 3mm is trimmed down. Also, even when wound back completely, the tensioner will still be in contact with the chain, pressing back on the tensioner. That means as you remove the bolts, they may be under some tension. Take your time and don't force anything. Once you have the tensioner off the block, rest it gently on something soft and use a careful touch with the gasket if you plan on reusing it.
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  5. REMINDER do NOT move the crankshaft now that the cam chain tensioner has been removed. If you do, the cam chain will skip teeth, moving the crankshaft out of time from the valve train.
  6. Mark the chain pins and sprocket teeth with corresponding witness marks (1, 2). Double check all 3 timing marks before you do this. This will be your target when reassembling.
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  7. Begin removing the cam caps (1). Start with the intake cap, then the exhaust cap. Remove the bolts in a crisscross order working from the outside inwards. Crack the bolt loose then move on to the next diagonally. Then return to the first side and crack that one loose, go diagonally to the other side, then crack the middle bolt on the opposite side from where you started, then get the last one. I removed the bolts evenly, about 1/2 turn at a time for each bolt following that pattern. I'm not sure if that level of detail is necessary, but I can say you definitely need to be even removing the bolts. You want to avoid the cap bending at all. A bent cap will apply uneven pressure to the camshaft journals and ruin the camshaft and thus the engine.
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  8. Remove the cam chain from the sprockets - make sure it is fastened to the frame so it doesn't fall into the crankcase! Then remove the camshafts and put them on something soft (1, 2).
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  9. Now the valve lifters are exposed (1). Stuff a rag into the cam chain area to avoid anything falling into the crankcase (2). Identify the valve shims that need to be replaced. Work one valve at a time to avoid messing up which shim came from where. Pull the valve lifter and valve shim out with an extendable magnet (3). It should capture both the lifter and the shim. Be very, very careful that the shim does not fall into the engine - plug everything up!
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  10. Working one valve at a time, take out the shim from the follower. The shims probably have the measurement laser etched into them, but you should still check with your calipers (1). Record the measurement of the existing shim into your diagram from earlier.
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  11. Now that you've measured the existing incorrectly sized shim, calculate the new shim size (1,2). Add the hypothetical shim adjustment value calculated before to the measured shim size to get the correct shim size. Round it if necessary to get a size you actually have using the table below or your own judgement. When making this adjustment, bear in mind that you should be adjusting to the higher (looser) end of the specification range. The valve train will wear over time and make the clearance smaller and smaller until you need to do this again. Do yourself a favor and don't adjust the valve clearance to the smaller (tighter) end of the specification.
    1. image.png.c6b7f77d28eac1042ff4446d0bc7ea40.png
    2. (Measured clearance - Desired clearance) + Installed shim size = new shim size
  12. Coat the new valve shim with assembly lube (1) - the red stuff, technically speaking molybdenum disulfide based lubricant. Install the shim in the depression on the valve making absolutely sure the shim is in place square, not crooked (2). You'll feel it click into place. Coat the valve lifter ("bucket") with engine oil and replace over the shim you just installed. Then move on to the next valve that needs attention, repeating the process you just followed.
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  13. When you're done replacing the valve shims, it's time to replace the camshafts, cam caps, cam chain, and cam chain tensioner. Then you'll check your work by rotating the engine, rechecking the clearances, and if you're satisfied, button it all back up. Start that process by placing the camshafts back where you found them. Begin with the exhaust camshaft (1). Put the timing mark parallel with the cylinder head again. Grab the chain and drape it over the sprocket, matching the witness marks you made on the chain pin and tooth. Two things are important here: 1. You need to make sure the chain is as tight as possible on the exhaust side while draping the chain over the exhaust camshaft sprocket; and 2. do not pull the chain hard enough to move the crankshaft! These are competing goals, so take your time here and be sure the marks all line up. Remember that the cam chain tensioner can only apply tension on one side (the intake side) of the cam chain, so that's why we are pulling the exhaust side tight without moving the crankshaft.
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  14. Coat the camshaft cap journals and the camshaft journals with assembly lube (1,2 - ignore that the intake cam is in place in this photo!). Coat the cap bolts in engine oil. Replace the exhaust camshaft cap, pressing gently until the cap snaps into place. Be very careful placing the bolts into their holes, taking care not to drop them into the crankcase! Tighten the camshaft cap from the inside out (the opposite of when we removed it), tightening in stages so that it is evenly applied. Be sure your witness marks are aligned! It is very important that the caps are torqued evenly and properly. I finger-tightened them 1/2 turn at a time following the crisscross pattern described in the last post until they were all finger-tight. Then I got the 1/4" torque wrench and continued turning each 1/2 turn until they were all torqued properly. The mistake to be made here is unevenly tightening the caps and warping them slightly. My intake cap was actually slightly warped from the factory, but I compensated by tightening the lifted side an extra full turn before resuming the gradual 1/2 turn process. The cap bolts for both sides are to be torqued to 10Nm or 7.2 lbft.
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  15. Install the intake camshaft, aligning the markings with the cylinder head edge (1). Again drape the chain over top of the sprocket, aligning your witness marks. Zip tie the chain to the intake sprocket by putting a tie through the holes in the sprocket. This is to ensure the chain doesn't skip as the intake cap and cam chain tensioner are being installed. Do not forget to cut these off when you're done, and when you do, do not let the tie fall into the crankcase!
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  16. Replace the cam chain tensioner. It should still have the hex key inserted all the way, retracting the tensioner into itself. If it isn't retract it now by inserting a trimmed-down 3mm hex key and turning it counter clockwise until it stops (1). Make sure the gasket is attached with the protruding tab facing upwards and insert it into the block. Replace the 5mm hex bolts and begin tightening them down while the key is still inserted into the tensioner. Tighten them both to 10Nm or 7.2lbft.
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  17. When you're certain the cap bolts are all torqued properly and that the alignment marks and witness marks are all aligned, go ahead and pull the hex key out. This will snap the actuator forward, tensioning the chain. This is what the zip ties were for. Once it's snapped out, cut the zip ties around the sprockets while holding the tie so they don't fall into the engine. Hopefully your chain didn't skip any teeth. Now that the camshafts are installed, the camshaft caps are installed, the cam chain tensioner is installed, and all of the marks are aligned, we can rotate the engine counter clockwise again. Turn it over maybe 5 times to spread the assembly lube and seat all of the parts. Now remeasure your clearances using the steps you followed earlier. The clearances should be as you calculated them unless you made a mistake measuring the first time. If something is wrong, now is the time to disassemble and make it right. If the clearances are as expected, turn the engine over a few more times until you're satisfied, and replace everything you removed.
  18. When replacing the valve cover, having all of the wiring zip tied up to the frame really helps. I had to dab some grease into the channel molded into the valve cover to get the gasket to stay put in the cover while finagling the cover over the head again. If you do this, apply it sparingly and wipe off any excess that smushes out of the sides. You should use gasket sealer to do this but I didn't want the rubber to stick permanently. To be clear, do not put any sealant between the rubber gasket and the cylinder head! That interface should be bone dry and clean. You'll have to push in one end of the cover, then pivot up the other end of the cover up and over the camshaft caps. The crankcase breather hose connection is a real bitch because it interferes with the useless long bolts on the ECU tray above the engine. Wear some gloves. When it's time to tighten the valve cover, tighten in stages to 10Nm or 7.2 lbft.
  19. Reinstall the crankshaft end cover making sure the rubber O-ring is clean (10Nm or 7.2lbft), and the timing mark access bolt (15Nm or 11lbft). Install the cam chain cover bolt (7Nm or 5.1lbft).
  20. Replace everything else you took off. Remember to twist your gas tank back the way it came, and don't forget to plug in the fuel pump, the air sensor (the plug on the front of the gas tank), the fan motor, and the ignition coils back to their original places.

You just saved a few hundred bucks, and more importantly, you've earned your man card. Have a beer (or 4) to celebrate!

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his face seems pulled and tense
like he's riding on a motorbike in the strongest winds

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noodles

I really took my time doing this and tried to document it as best I could. I hope this helps someone. If you've read this far, you should know that I'm not an expert so I apologize if I got something wrong above - hence the disclaimer at the start.

But I did follow the manual to the letter, and my machine did indeed start up and runs just fine after the procedure. I will say that I actually screwed up and turned the crankshaft before I put the chain tensioner on (like an idiot!), so I had to retime the engine using the alignment marks without the aid of my witness marks. But my motor didn't blow up in the end!

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Cruizin
1 hour ago, noodles said:

I really took my time doing this and tried to document it as best I could. I hope this helps someone. If you've read this far, you should know that I'm not an expert so I apologize if I got something wrong above - hence the disclaimer at the start.

But I did follow the manual to the letter, and my machine did indeed start up and runs just fine after the procedure. I will say that I actually screwed up and turned the crankshaft before I put the chain tensioner on (like an idiot!), so I had to retime the engine using the alignment marks without the aid of my witness marks. But my motor didn't blow up in the end!

Im making you a free premium member for doing this, thank you so very much! Great job! 

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bugeyes

Thank you!

Gives me something to do during the winter standstill.

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fzar

Thanks for putting together a very well documented and explained very important piece of information. It seems like you put a lot of work into it @noodles for whatever reason! I don't think it's getting enough recognition, as other's and  myself included have been looking for someone to do this for quite some time.  Thanks for the fantastic addition to the Tech-Tips section.

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Bigturbomax

Very good work! Thank you for taking the time to write up the procedure!

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noodles
1 hour ago, fzar said:

Thanks for putting together a very well documented and explained very important piece of information. It seems like you put a lot of work into it @noodles for whatever reason! I don't think it's getting enough recognition, as other's and  myself included have been looking for someone to do this for quite some time.  Thanks for the fantastic addition to the Tech-Tips section.

Thanks! I pulled so much from this and other sites to learn automotive maintenance, so when I saw a way I could give back what I'd taken I thought it was a good thing to do. Besides, I like being thorough to prevent mistakes, and documenting it all made me think through each step. 

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elmo

Awesome job documenting your process, you earned  more than a few beers, Thanks

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noodles
9 hours ago, elmo said:

Awesome job documenting your process, you earned  more than a few beers, Thanks

This was a 2 day , 5 beer job for me

I should've written up replacing the front brake piston seals, that was a 6 beer job 🙄

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DewMan
8 hours ago, noodles said:

This was a 2 day , 5 beer job for me

I should've written up replacing the front brake piston seals, that was a 6 beer job 🙄

Issues popping out the pistons?


DewMan
 
Just shut up and ride.

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fzar
10 hours ago, noodles said:

This was a 2 day , 5 beer job for me

I should've written up replacing the front brake piston seals, that was a 6 beer job 🙄

Your going to have to now, seeming as you put it out there, dangling the carrot of information. @noodles

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noodles
1 hour ago, DewMan said:

Issues popping out the pistons?

I had to figure out what I was doing as I did it. It wasn't so much "how do I get the pistons out?" as much as it was "how do I get them out without smashing them into one another?"

I ended up using a custom-cut credit card to fit over one side, secured it with zip ties, then put a wood block over the credit card so when the pistons popped, they'd hit soft wood. Figuring that out was easier after 4 beers, I always feel more 'creative' 😉 and then of course I needed 2 more while peeling out the seals with care

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SteveR

Forgive me if I’m seeing this wrong but your pictures seem to show cams in position to start the intake stroke for #1 cylinder. Are you timing to set  #1 at TDC on compression stroke?

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noodles
On 10/2/2019 at 3:10 PM, SteveR said:

Forgive me if I’m seeing this wrong but your pictures seem to show cams in position to start the intake stroke for #1 cylinder. Are you timing to set  #1 at TDC on compression stroke?

The timing marks for this engine set piston #1 at TDC on the compression stroke. If the camshafts are removed, the timing mark on the flywheel combined with checking to be sure piston #1 is at TDC should be enough to ensure that #2 is correctly positioned too when reinstalling the camshafts with their timing marks aligned. However, all of this is irrelevant if you did not move the crankshaft once you removed the camshafts.

image.png.03ed5dd99e64cdded3b904095e8b9025.png

When the timing marks on the camshaft sprockets are aligned with the head's edge, the flywheel's timing mark is aligned with the mark on the crankshaft cover, and piston #1 is at TDC on compression stroke, the exhaust and intake camshaft lobes are facing each other as drawn below. I don't remember what angles cylinder #2's lobes were at, to be honest. Once the engine is turned CCW 270 degrees, #2's cam lobes should also be exerting no pressure on the valves as #2 will be at TDC. If I made an error in the photos showing that position I apologize, but this is the process as I remember it:

image.thumb.png.4f04b0a44e9ff3b10923b3f66f7eea09.png


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like he's riding on a motorbike in the strongest winds

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versysrider

Excellent write up and pics, I know this took you a lot of time to do. This is the best of what forums/the internet are all about, sharing info and helping others along the way.

Great job!


'16 Yamaha FZ-07, '15 Yamaha FZ-09

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HunterStew

Total wizardry!!!! 

I'm hands on, but you my friend are master mechanic.

All I can say is thank you for taking your time and sharing. 

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