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West

I need to lower my bike a bit.

1.5 is fine..what had anyone used?

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Spanglo

Easier and less expensive to buy boots with a 1.5" heel...

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Mad

Lowering a bike is the last thing to consider! believe me , if you can , avoid it

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Littlebriar

I bought a pair of these. Not cheap but very well made and very comfortable. No one will know these are lift boots either. I need to wear these when I ride my BMW and they are much better (and cheaper) option than lowering the bike.


Steve, 2017 Yamaha FZ-07, 2016 BMW 1200RT, Harbor Beach, Michigan

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West

Thanks, but backing up or moving around on a hill with gravel, tippy toes are not working for me. All other aspects fine, have taller boots.

I can put one foot down in everyday traffic, but we travel with bikes on trailer searching out every manner of twistie roads and many times I just need a tad more to be able to move bike around.

I really hate to have hubbie do it for me.

It is really a safety matter, so if anyone has had luck with any lowering kits, I would love to know.

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FZ07R WaNaB
8 hours ago, West said:

so if anyone has had luck with any lowering kits,

I've done the research, and this appears to be the best. One of the guys on this forum uses it and speaks highly of it. I'm going to be ordering it myself. It's not cheap though

https://www.extremecreations.com.au/mt-07-jack-up-plates

 

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worker1

If your weight allows it (150lbs or less) you could set rear shock preload to the lightest setting (1 or 0). Also, possibly have some foam removed from the outside of the seat. I would read this thread, especially pattonme's comments. Looks like you can get about 1" from this method, relatively cheap.

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West
On 1/26/2019 at 8:30 AM, rich01760 said:

I'm 5'6" with short legs, about a 29" inseam.  I get both balls of my feet down but still a good 2 or 3 inches from being able to flat foot. I wear tactical boots with a thick sole to give me a bit more reach. It's not too much of a problem except on uneven terrain. 

 

16 hours ago, worker1 said:

If your weight allows it (150lbs or less) you could set rear shock preload to the lightest setting (1 or 0). Also, possibly have some foam removed from the outside of the seat. I would read this thread, especially pattonme's comments. Looks like you can get about 1" from this method, relatively cheap.

Hey, that's just what I did!

Thanks!

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NikitaUCLA
On 3/21/2019 at 6:00 AM, FZ07R WaNaB said:

I've done the research, and this appears to be the best. One of the guys on this forum uses it and speaks highly of it. I'm going to be ordering it myself. It's not cheap though

https://www.extremecreations.com.au/mt-07-jack-up-plates

 

I agree. Buy this and raise the front forks up until it barely hits the handlebar. It's going to be fine. 

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sorkyah
2 hours ago, NikitaUCLA said:

I agree. Buy this and raise the front forks up until it barely hits the handlebar. It's going to be fine. 

Only problem is the shipping. 

You'll be receiving it from Australia, meaning the shipping will be nearly as much as the part if you're in the states.


ATGATT... ATTATT, two acronyms I live by.
 

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FZ07R WaNaB
4 hours ago, sorkyah said:

You'll be receiving it from Australia, meaning the shipping will be nearly as much as the part if you're in the states.

Nope, that's not the case. My shipping charge was $17.55 US ($25 AUD) from Australia to Virginia. It came 8 days after I placed the order. The total US cost was $200.35 which included around $8 that it appears PayPal charged for their doing the currency exchange. It also included new needle bearings and seals pre-installed.

 

Edited by FZ07R WaNaB

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FZ07R WaNaB
4 hours ago, NikitaUCLA said:

This is just as good.

I'll guarantee you that is pure garbage compared to the Extreme Creations link. I took that over to my local bike shop and showed it around. Everyone was blown away by the quality of that link. It's pricey, but the workmanship is well worth it. It will never let you down.

 

 

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NikitaUCLA

It’s just a simple dog bone linkage. I had it on my dirt bike and I jumped 40-50 foot tabletops with no issues. 

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sorkyah
1 hour ago, FZ07R WaNaB said:

Nope, that's not the case. My shipping charge was $17.55 US ($25 AUD) from Australia to Virginia. It came 8 days after I placed the order. The total US cost was $200.35 which included around $8 that it appears PayPal charged for their doing the currency exchange. It also included new needle bearings and seals pre-installed.

 

I stand corrected. 

Good buy then 


ATGATT... ATTATT, two acronyms I live by.
 

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shinyribs
13 hours ago, NikitaUCLA said:
$_62.JPG?set_id=880000500F
WWW.EBAY.COM

Find great deals for FZ-07 Lowering Link Links Kit 2015 2016 2017 Adjustable FZ07 FZ 07 NICE!!. Shop with confidence on eBay!

This is just as good.

Be sure to also get an adjustable side-stand or shorten it about 1/3 of an inch or so.

Those Heim joint are extremely strong. This link setup is very common and is CONSIDERABLY stronger than the factory link ever thought about. The only draw back is those joints are not sealed and live on a pretty harsh place, so they may eventually develop some slop. But on the flip side, Heim joints are hardware store common, so you could replace any joint that may wear very easily. You can replace a Heim joint for a fraction of the cost of the expensive needle bearings typically found in this area, and it's a job done in minutes. That is a solid and proven way to make custom bike linkage. The only bad things is how much they are overcharging for a handful of Heims joints, jam nuts and the coupling sleeve ( all standard hardware). The adapter bushings is what your are really buying here. 

If there is a big call for kits like this I can turn up some adapter bushings on the lathe and assemble some affordable kits. I'm planning to raise my bike using this method. When I get in there to do it I can post up my measurements.

 

For the record, those are 1/2"Heim joints in that link. Therear suspension on my drag car ( 1,000hp/ 750 ftlbs/tq pushing 2800 lbs) was comprised of 3/4" Heims. You can buy sealed Heims and dust covers for them. Drives the price up, but a standard Heim in the tensile strength needed for this task is only about $5-6 each. 

 

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NikitaUCLA
6 hours ago, shinyribs said:

Those Heim joint are extremely strong. This link setup is very common and is CONSIDERABLY stronger than the factory link ever thought about. The only draw back is those joints are not sealed and live on a pretty harsh place, so they may eventually develop some slop. But on the flip side, Heim joints are hardware store common, so you could replace any joint that may wear very easily. You can replace a Heim joint for a fraction of the cost of the expensive needle bearings typically found in this area, and it's a job done in minutes. That is a solid and proven way to make custom bike linkage. The only bad things is how much they are overcharging for a handful of Heims joints, jam nuts and the coupling sleeve ( all standard hardware). The adapter bushings is what your are really buying here. 

If there is a big call for kits like this I can turn up some adapter bushings on the lathe and assemble some affordable kits. I'm planning to raise my bike using this method. When I get in there to do it I can post up my measurements.

 

For the record, those are 1/2"Heim joints in that link. Therear suspension on my drag car ( 1,000hp/ 750 ftlbs/tq pushing 2800 lbs) was comprised of 3/4" Heims. You can buy sealed Heims and dust covers for them. Drives the price up, but a standard Heim in the tensile strength needed for this task is only about $5-6 each. 

 

Where is a good place to purchase these parts so that we can make them for ourselves? 

 

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shinyribs
1 hour ago, NikitaUCLA said:

Where is a good place to purchase these parts so that we can make them for ourselves? 

 

The simple answer would be McMaster-Carr for online shopping. They're not always the cheapest, but they're usually reasonable. They offer a ton of selection, though. I just checked and they are getting $6.58/ea for 1/2" rod ends. Any good sized local hardware store should stock the smaller sizes, though. 

Link the MM-C's rod end page:

mcm_logo_hires.png?ver=1539608820
WWW.MCMASTER.COM

Choose from our selection of rod ends, including ball joint rod ends, internally threaded ball joint rod ends, and more. In stock and ready to ship.

Couple things to note, though. I don't know exactly why that linkage builder is using 1/2" rod ends. It's possible he needs that size in order for the coupling nuts to belong enough? Or maybe he needs the 1/2" opening so he can fit his reducing bushings in there. I'm not positive, but I'm pretty sure that's a 10mm bolt used there. Nothing wrong with a 1/2" rod end, but you're not locked in to that size. 

At any rate, notice how some of the fasteners in the ad for that linkage have little tick marks on them. These "knicks" denote that as lefthand thread. 

9587%20LH%20Clyinder%20Nut_med.jpg

Since he's using a combination of lefthand and righthand thread you can adjust your ride height with the links installed, because it creates a tun buckle. You could build the same linkage with all RH thread, just knowing you'd have to pull the rods off the bike to make linkage length changes. 

You can rack up some money installing seals on to rod ends, but honestly it's not critical for the typical street bike. You can scroll down on McMaster-Carr's rod end page and find seals. Or you can pay extra initially for sealed rod ends. These linkages rotate very,very little and I doubt the lack of a bearing, or even a spherical rod end is really adding much performance to the suspension, if any. You could also use solid rod ends and just grease the bolt up. Speedway Motors, Summit Racing and Jegs all should stock a good selection of spherical and solid rod ends. Which to use will be your choice. 

721RER12_L_5e02d900-7531-46e8-ac8f-9dea8

Lot's of bikes work like this without issue. Actually, needle bearings typically don't do well in environments like this where they can't rotate fully. Bushings are much better for these jobs, but motorcycle riders love to read about "low friction needles" on their spec sheets, and bushes take more labor to properly install at the factory. Needle bearings make assembly lines easy. 

You can sometimes avoid using an additional coupling nut/shaft between a pair of rod ends if your length allow you just attach a male and female rod end together. 

s-l500.jpg

 

Sorry for getting longwinded. Been doing too much of that around here lately. Don't mean to insult your intelligence if you already knew all this. When I was making lots of linkages we had a speed shop and were buying from Summit Racing's wholesale division(Atech) and parts were dirt cheap. I haven't shopped for rod ends for a long time, so you may find better deals if you look around but this should cover your bases. 

 

 

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shinyribs
18 hours ago, FZ07R WaNaB said:

I'll guarantee you that is pure garbage compared to the Extreme Creations link. I took that over to my local bike shop and showed it around. Everyone was blown away by the quality of that link. It's pricey, but the workmanship is well worth it. It will never let you down.

 

 

Those links are a piece of art! Dollar for dollar, yeah, the heim joint linkage kit is junk in comparison when considering they are basically the same price ($170 vs $198?). There's some very detailed machine work on those EC links.  Very clever how it twists together. Though rod ends in general aren't junk and are totally up to the task. 

0001836_mt-07-fz-07-xsr700-jack-up-lower

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FZ07R WaNaB
40 minutes ago, shinyribs said:

Those links are a piece of art! Dollar for dollar, yeah, the heim joint linkage kit is junk in comparison when considering they are basically the same price ($170 vs $198?). There's some very detailed machine work on those EC links.  Very clever how it twists together.

Gotta tell you, while the pics look really good, when you have that thing in your hands you quickly realize how freaking good the machining is. I think the bike will be long dead before that link dies. It also makes the bike usable for a lot of different size people or track work.

Plus, that $198 is in Aussie dollars - it's actually $139 in US dollars.

 

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NikitaUCLA

This real question is.....what is the worth of feeling confident and comfortable on your bike. 

Once I asked myself that question regarding my wife's bike, I went ahead and ordered the linkage regardless of price. Do I want my wife to feel confident while riding with the seat lowered? Of course!

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NikitaUCLA
1 hour ago, shinyribs said:

The simple answer would be McMaster-Carr for online shopping. They're not always the cheapest, but they're usually reasonable. They offer a ton of selection, though. I just checked and they are getting $6.58/ea for 1/2" rod ends. Any good sized local hardware store should stock the smaller sizes, though. 

Link the MM-C's rod end page:

mcm_logo_hires.png?ver=1539608820
WWW.MCMASTER.COM

Choose from our selection of rod ends, including ball joint rod ends, internally threaded ball joint rod ends, and more. In stock and ready to ship.

Couple things to note, though. I don't know exactly why that linkage builder is using 1/2" rod ends. It's possible he needs that size in order for the coupling nuts to belong enough? Or maybe he needs the 1/2" opening so he can fit his reducing bushings in there. I'm not positive, but I'm pretty sure that's a 10mm bolt used there. Nothing wrong with a 1/2" rod end, but you're not locked in to that size. 

At any rate, notice how some of the fasteners in the ad for that linkage have little tick marks on them. These "knicks" denote that as lefthand thread. 

9587%20LH%20Clyinder%20Nut_med.jpg

Since he's using a combination of lefthand and righthand thread you can adjust your ride height with the links installed, because it creates a tun buckle. You could build the same linkage with all RH thread, just knowing you'd have to pull the rods off the bike to make linkage length changes. 

You can rack up some money installing seals on to rod ends, but honestly it's not critical for the typical street bike. You can scroll down on McMaster-Carr's rod end page and find seals. Or you can pay extra initially for sealed rod ends. These linkages rotate very,very little and I doubt the lack of a bearing, or even a spherical rod end is really adding much performance to the suspension, if any. You could also use solid rod ends and just grease the bolt up. Speedway Motors, Summit Racing and Jegs all should stock a good selection of spherical and solid rod ends. Which to use will be your choice. 

721RER12_L_5e02d900-7531-46e8-ac8f-9dea8

Lot's of bikes work like this without issue. Actually, needle bearings typically don't do well in environments like this where they can't rotate fully. Bushings are much better for these jobs, but motorcycle riders love to read about "low friction needles" on their spec sheets, and bushes take more labor to properly install at the factory. Needle bearings make assembly lines easy. 

You can sometimes avoid using an additional coupling nut/shaft between a pair of rod ends if your length allow you just attach a male and female rod end together. 

s-l500.jpg

 

Sorry for getting longwinded. Been doing too much of that around here lately. Don't mean to insult your intelligence if you already knew all this. When I was making lots of linkages we had a speed shop and were buying from Summit Racing's wholesale division(Atech) and parts were dirt cheap. I haven't shopped for rod ends for a long time, so you may find better deals if you look around but this should cover your bases. 

 

 

Thanks! This is very useful.

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br4nd0n

@shinyribs you mentioned Summit Racing and McMaster-Carr which got me wondering if you were from Ohio.

Edited by br4nd0n

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shinyribs
7 minutes ago, br4nd0n said:

@shinyribs you mentioned Summit Racing and got me wondering if you were from Ohio.

Nope. I'm in VA, actually. 

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