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ahnorris13

Tires - Back End Sliding Around

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ahnorris13
I am on older rider (40s), just bought the FZ-07 and traded in a 2008 Ducati Monster.  I love how easy and smooth the FZ-07 is to ride. Little more comfortable position also.  Only issues is the back end wants to slide around during hard braking.  I notice the FZ-07 does have stronger back breaks, so I need to easy up a little.  I am wondering, any feedback on the Pilot 3 tires that came with the bike, could they be that much harded/slicker vs the Brigdestone Battlax S20 on the older Ducati?  Could tires make that much difference? Could the geometry of the bike make that much difference.  Considering replacing the back tire after 700 miles.
 
Any feedback is appreciated, thanks
 
 
 

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beardo
Couple questions come to mind.
 
HOW are you braking?
 
What is the surface you are braking on?
 
The first deals with rider technique.
 
The second deals with road conditions.
 
A third aspect, and nonetheless important, is how your bike is set-up.

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ahnorris13
Usually mostly front brake and drag a little backbreak, let of back brake if going into turn. The surface is good asphalt, dry, sunny day. The bike is set up stock, except the preload on the back is all the way to soft. I am about 190#

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hippiebikerchick
Welcome ahnorris13! Glad you joined our little group. I use mostly front brake, adding the rear gently if needed. I'm sure someone on the forum will answer your question shortly.

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crazycracka501
Hey ahnorris13, I'm 150 lbs and required my preload at rear shock to be set full as hard as it will go and that seemed just enough to keep the rear from being so sloppy. I'm thinking if you have yours set to full soft, that might be majority of your problem. The rear shock isn't very well suited for anyone over 160 in my mind. Try cranking it back the other way and see what that does for you. Also, don't forget the engine brake is a little more severe on these bikes than most I've ridden so that may play into the tire sliding around if downshifting and braking rear brake at same time.

Make it stop!....Now make it go faster!

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hobbs
What's your tire PSI? (Cold psi)
Is the tire fully scrubbed in?
 
The rear brake is pretty stout and it's not very hard to lock up.
 
Is it loose every time you brake, or only during hard braking?

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stefano225
  
The rear brake is pretty stout and it's not very hard to lock up.
 
 

Exactly what I was thinking never had back brake lock up unless I was hard braking ,I use front brake most of the times with little rear brake .

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ahnorris13
Thanks for all the good advice, will try adjusting the preload. Need to remember the downshifting can cause the rear wheel to go loose, my last bike had a slipper clutch. Not sure on the scrubbed tire, will work on that.

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Guest Ralph
Rear axle is tight I take it ridden both Michelin and Bridgestone shod MT's and non
squirmed about, thought the Michelin tyres were best but not much in it, the rear brake
is more powerful than most and the clutch as a short bite point so maybe it's a combination
of the two but not heard of others complaining, I would check the tyre pressure and give
the wheel and swinging arm a good shaking about you never know something could be loose.

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YZEtc
Thanks for all the good advice, will try adjusting the preload. Need to remember the downshifting can cause the rear wheel to go loose, my last bike had a slipper clutch. Not sure on the scrubbed tire, will work on that.
This is my guess as to the cause.Try blipping the throttle before you release the clutch to better match the revs.Or, just back it in. :) 

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howlinhoss
I would first check your psi like others have said.

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fromthecage
Along with a couple replies, the only times I've had issues with the rear end feeling sloppy was when my tire pressures dropped a little low, and when the preload on the rear was still a little soft. With corrected tire pressures and two clicks up on the rear shock it's feeling a good bit better to me. (5'8, 165 lbs)

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trace20012
Ahnorris13 - I am having the same problem but it is mainly my lack of skill riding. Usually only happens when down shifting going into turns. I Just need to either down shift sonner or keep the revs up when getting off the clutch because it's all engine braking busting it loose.

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fromthecage
@trace20012 YZEtc recommended learning to blip the throttle (or rev match where I come from) to better match your RPM's. However downshifting sooner is a great idea as well. Always remember the basic rule of cornering; Slow, Look, Push, Roll.
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hobbs
Ahnorris13 - I am having the same problem but it is mainly my lack of skill riding. Usually only happens when down shifting going into turns. I Just need to either down shift sonner or keep the revs up when getting off the clutch because it's all engine braking busting it loose.
 
 
Definitely get your gear and speed set early before you countersteer your bike. You can learn trail braking as you gain experience, but until then do like others have said and be smooth. :D
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