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cornerslider

D.I.Y. Racetech front end

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cornerslider

I was servicing my front end, and thought I would post some how-to pics. I already installed the Racetech front end (2 years ago). I thought as long as it's apart, why not help someone out that might be a bit intimidated doing it themselves-

 

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The first step is to loosen (but not remove the top cap). You want to do this ON the bike, with the fork tubes still clamped in the triple clamps. If you forget this step, you will know why very soon 😕-...The OEM caps are silver. I have aftermarket "red" caps for preload adjustment-

 

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Loosen the axle pinch bolt (1) with a metric Allen wrench. Then, loosen (but do not remove) the axle with a 19mm wrench. The axle is behind axle slider (2) in this picture. You will see it in the next pic.

 

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Next, remove the brake caliper bolts on both sides. It's a good practice to secure them with zip ties, and NOT have them hanging from the brake lines (like I did)...

 

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Next, support the front end on a stand. If you don't have a front stand, you can "improvise" like I did. I hung a come-a-long from the ceiling (I would think a ratchet strap would work too). Anything to get the front wheel off the ground, and is secure. I put two "soft-straps" around the handlebars to help balance the bike on the come-a-long.

 

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Now, you can remove the two outer fender bolts with a metric Allen wrench. Now you should be able the remove the front axle all the way, and remove the front wheel. Be careful not to lose the axle spacers once the axle is out.

 

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Next, you can remove the "fender fairings". They lock onto the main fender in slots. Pull the bottom out sideways, while pulling the top towards you.

 

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Next, you can remove the inner fender bolts on both sides (2 on each side) with a 8mm wrench. Now you can remove the fender. There really isn't a good way to do this? I found lifting one side "up", and "rolling" the fender 90 degrees, then sliding it forward works about the best. 

 

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Loosen the lower pinch bolts on each side

 

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Loosen the upper pinch bolts on each side. The fork leg will fall out when the bolt is loose enough, so secure it with your other hand. The FZ-07 has black plastic "sleeves" between the upper & lower clamps (the MT-07 does NOT have these). There is also a o-ring in the bottom of this "sleeves". I have NO idea what purpose they serve???? The sleeves will stay on the bike, the o-ring may fall out of the bottom of the sleeves. Now, you can remove the top cap on the fork leg. There will be about 10mm of "preload" on the cap. It won't hurt you, but may startle you-

 

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Next, you want to make a "hook tool" (1) out of an old coat hanger. Use this to reach inside the fork tube, and hook the fork spring. Lift it up and remove everything from the spring up (you will get oil on whatever surface your working on, so put down a towel/rag). Part number (2) is steel from the factory. This will be discarded, and will be replaced with PVC pipe included with the Racetech springs. You will need to cut it to the proper length per the included Racetech instructions. If you choose to retain the OEM springs, you will need to purchase some 1" PVC pipe, and cut it to the proper length to retain the 10mm on preload on the spring.

 

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With the fork spring removed, compress the upper fork tube, until it bottoms out in the lower fork tube. Put a tape measure inside the fork tube and measure the oil level (a flashlight helps here). It should be about 5 inches from the top. Now you can turn the fork upside down, and drain the oil into a drain pan.

 

 

871927011_Dampenerrodremoval.jpg.0ebd7d99dba6c775caaae6766a6a5a2d.jpg

 

Next, you will need to remove the dampener rod. You will need a 8mm Allen wrench (1), and you MAY need a broom handle to hold the top of the dampener rod in place to loosen the Allen head cap screw on the bottom of the fork leg. If you have access to an impact gun, that is preferred, but I've have good luck on several bikes, with the Broom handle/Allen wrench combo 😎.

 

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Congratulations!!!! You have now taken the internals of your fork apart. This is a very simple design, and doesn't have that many parts. Be careful not to lose the copper sealing washer on the locking bolt. Next, you will need to drill some holes in the dampener rod (1). If memory serves, the OEM has four smaller holes. Those will need to be drilled out to 5/16" diameter, and two more 5/16" diameter holes will need to be drilled. The instructions from Racetech spell it out VERY clearly.

 

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This is a close up of the holes. Be sure to de-burr the holes (inside & out), as I did.

 

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Now, you can start re-assembling the fork. Start with locking the dampener rod back in the lower fork leg, and start working backwards from where you started. You can order everything from www.racetech.com (And NO-   I don't work for them) You will be adding the Goldvalve Emulators (1) $169. This is kind of a marvel of engineering (I think there may be some magic "pixie-dust" inside them too). You will get an "access code" for what Goldvalve/Emulator spring you should use, and how to set it up for the FZ-07 (all springs are included). The FZ-07 requires an "adapter" (2) with the Goldvalve Emulators (I think it's like $25?) I also highly recommend getting race tech springs (for your specific weight) $129. You will need about a liter of 10wt. fork oil as well.  I'm not going to go into all the details of reassembly. The Racetech instructions do a great job with that. I just wanted to show people what the internals look like, and if it's something someone would be comfortable doing. Racetech is a GREAT company to deal with if you have any issues with the install.  I hope this helps some people out 😎

 

I've done this on my last three bikes, and have NEVER been disappointed. For about $300, it will virtually ELIMINATE the front end dive when braking, and make everything work better in the front-end.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oil level.JPG

Edited by cornerslider
duplicate pictures
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""W.O.T. until you see god, then brake"

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DewMan

Nice write up! Thanks for taking the time. 👍

 

I would suggest one change to your steps. I suggest you loosen the top clamp bolt, leaving the bottom bolts tight,  prior to loosening your top caps. This will make loosening your top caps easier. ✌️

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DewMan
 
Just shut up and ride.

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Evill_Ed

Nice write up, thanks for sharing. 

How does this set up compares to catridges? 

 

Ed

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cornerslider
4 hours ago, evilled said:

Nice write up, thanks for sharing. 

How does this set up compares to catridges? 

 

Ed

Once you get it "dialed in", I think it's ALMOST as good? The only downside is that to "fine-tune" them, you need to pull the forks apart to adjust/tweak them..... If I was racing, I'd go with cartridges. I don't race, or chase championships....I'm a 49 year-old trackday rider. I set them them up to Racetechs' recommended settings, and haven't changed them. Even my suspension tuner was impressed with them (I run an Öhlins rear). I think for spirited street riders & canyon carvers, most riders would be very happy with the set-up.

 

BTW: If you have any questions about the install/set-up, feel free to PM me 😎-

Edited by cornerslider
typo-
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""W.O.T. until you see god, then brake"

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prospeed44

Great write up for sure . The only thing i would ad is to buy a front end stem stand . Cheap on Ebay and worth the cost for ease of front end servicing .

fz07 race build #2 010.jpg

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firstyammerha

if our fork legs had drain holes, wouldn't this be a lot easier? Pull the fork springs out, drop in the emulator and refill with another fork oil of a lighter weight. Dexron LV and ULV transmission fluids have ctsk ratings down around 16.  Am I right?

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cornerslider

That would be nice to have drains holes 😎.... I'm not really sure what 
"ctsk ratings" are?


""W.O.T. until you see god, then brake"

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rick
14 hours ago, cornerslider said:

That would be nice to have drains holes 😎.... I'm not really sure what 
"ctsk ratings" are?

More properly abbreviated as cSt.  It's a true viscosity rating. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viscosity

 

If you search for oil viscosity ratings, you'll see that a "10" weight oil (or whatever viscosity rating) can be within a  range of cSt values - the range can be quite large. This is especially true with motor oils. Some 1w40 weight oils will start at the bottom of the range, some in the middle and some at th top. An oil that starts oil life near the bottom of the cST range will no longer be in the range when it's tired. 

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firstyammerha

I'm a fan of ATF from way back where I used it on my MX/hare scramble bikes. It was cheap back then but today they are mostly synthetic and in the price range of m/c fork oil at the dealership. As far as life expectancy goes, the car manufacturers today recommend trans service around 100,000 miles.  I don't think any of us would have to worry about the viscosity reducing during the life of our bikes. Wikipedia showed Dexron III had a cSt ratings of 35 which is what seems to be the popular rating for a fork oil on this site. Dexron III is the oil before Dexron VI and the LV/ULV of today. The current six, eight and ten speed automotive transmissions use them-even Fords. 

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rick

Was talking about motor oils losing viscosity (shock absorber oil does get plenty warm) - but yeah, fork oils will be relatively stable when it comes to viscosity. What they won't remain is clean. And because there's a microscopic loss of oil with every fork compression and the level can only be measured with a service, may as well just get in there and swap for new. 

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cornerslider
3 hours ago, rick said:

Was talking about motor oils losing viscosity (shock absorber oil does get plenty warm) - but yeah, fork oils will be relatively stable when it comes to viscosity. What they won't remain is clean. And because there's a microscopic loss of oil with every fork compression and the level can only be measured with a service, may as well just get in there and swap for new. 

That is a very good point 👍- I service my front end every two years for this reason alone 😎. I'm always amazed at how dirty the oil is. Even though I really shouldn't be? Two years of constant sliding on "bushings", and no oil filter (in the forks), the oil WILL get dirty. I service/rebuild my rear shock (Öhlins) every two years as well. I honestly, have never heard of the "cSt values" before this post? I just run Ohlins 10wt fork oil. I figure they have "one job"- SUSPENSION..... I figure they are close enough for the level I'm at 😀-

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""W.O.T. until you see god, then brake"

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rick

 think some of the "mud" that accumulates is from the springs rubbing inside. Once Those bits get a polish - say 500 miles, the oil seems to stay cleaner. But i've seen compression valves at the bottom of fork legs filled with crud. 

 

a cSt is 10x more than a mSt. 😉

 

This is a good read. Can really see how one company's whatever wt fork oil can be really different from another's in real viscosity numbers. Also shows the range that motor oils can be and still be called whatever weight. with cars more and more using thinner oils (as in 0w20), your choice of brand can be the difference between having an oil at the top of the range when new, or one just barely there.   https://www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid

Edited by rick
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fzar
On 1/11/2019 at 4:47 PM, cornerslider said:

I just run Ohlins 10wt fork oil. I figure they have "one job"- SUSPENSION..... I figure they are close enough for the level I'm at 😀-

You would think, and hope so, but when someone shouts (YOU HAD ONE JOB TO DO, ONE F@@@KIN JOB) all I'm saying is that everyone makes mistakes. I personally would put more trust in companies like Ohlins, Sachs, Silkolene and the like over Maxima, etc. I really don't really know anything about suspension oil and viscosity over cst's @ 100F or 40 F. Just an observance on my part.

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fishtaco

Good work Cornerslider, this article just made my job easier when I swap in those cartridges....Thanks

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cornerslider
6 hours ago, fishtaco said:

Good work Cornerslider, this article just made my job easier when I swap in those cartridges....Thanks

Welcome to the forum 😎.... I'm glad I could help you out. You will find most folks here are always willing to help out-


""W.O.T. until you see god, then brake"

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fzar
On 11/24/2018 at 4:19 PM, cornerslider said:

I have aftermarket "red" caps for preload adjustment-

 

Where did you get the red caps from? Was it Race-tech or another source? Race-tech may well be getting a call from me soon. Thanks for the write up and clear description on each stage @cornerslider 

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cornerslider

I just bought them off eBay... Cheap, and unbranded, and they work well for my purpose. I think I paid less than $25???

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""W.O.T. until you see god, then brake"

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fzar
On 11/24/2018 at 4:19 PM, cornerslider said:

746040730_Dampenerrodholes.JPG.53e70cec5092bf8036bba5cd744a3282.JPG

This is a close up of the holes. Be sure to de-burr the holes (inside & out), as I did.

How do you go about de-burring the inside after drilling the holes without getting tons of shavings in there? Maybe a stupid question! I just don't know @cornerslider

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Evill_Ed
40 minutes ago, fzar said:

How do you go about de-burring the inside after drilling the holes without getting tons of shavings in there? Maybe a stupid question! I just don't know @cornerslider

You use deburring tools like these. You just rotate around the holes on the inside and outside edges to deburr..you can then blow, vacuum or wash our any metal shavings.

Ed

A9DCEE4D-FC32-4055-990D-61778B78F29D.thumb.jpeg.f3230253127bb0c16866f472887655e5.jpeg 

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cornerslider
3 hours ago, fzar said:

How do you go about de-burring the inside after drilling the holes without getting tons of shavings in there? Maybe a stupid question! I just don't know @cornerslider

Basically what EvilEd said...😎

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firstyammerha

not having drain plugs in the sliders really complicates the job. I think I might try removing the d rods through the top one day.   

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