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3crows

Slider bolt torque at frame to engine bolt?

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3crows

This is probably the wrong forum. But, here goes. I am installing Womet-Tech slider kit and I have only owned the motorcycle two weeks. I have not had time to get the maintenance manual. Can anybody tell me the torque please for the two bolts that suspend the engine to frame. I have to remove those two bolts to install the frame sliders with longer bolts. Any help much appreciated. Thank you.

 

James

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DewMan

75Nm/54ft.lbf

 

Capture.thumb.JPG.242ec29fb36e7f65ad245bb1b38be9bd.JPG

Edited by DewMan

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3crows

Thank you DewMan. That looks like a winner with 54 ft-lb. Cool!

 

James

Edited by 3crows

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blackout

I use anti-sieze on those fasteners.  And double check the torque after 100 miles.  But that's me.

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3crows

I had intended to use Loctite 242. But, are the manual torques dry or lubricated or does it say at all? 

 

I am not against using anti-sieze at all but it does affect the torque. Using an anti-aieze or grease can lead to much higher torque up than intended if dry specifications are given.

 

I actually am, or was, a working mechanic, A&P, IA. 

 

James

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DewMan
10 hours ago, 3crows said:

I had intended to use Loctite 242. But, are the manual torques dry or lubricated or does it say at all? 

James

The manual is pretty good about indicating when a particular type of lubricant/thread locker is recommended. These particular bolts list nothing. So this would appear be a dry spec.

 

Do the sliders list anything in their instructions? I assume the factory bolts are being replaced with the supplied bolts.

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3crows

DewMan, no the slider instructions are pretty sparse. I agree with the other fellow on the anti-sieze, just do not want to over torque the bolt either. I may just use a touch of anti-seize and drop the torque off 10 or 15 percent. Then check it again after some running about. 

 

Why 15%, well, I have done some testing in my job, dry vs. lubricated torque and measuring bolt stretch, that is around where it is typically, sometimes a lot more. Thus my concern. 

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DewMan
3 minutes ago, 3crows said:

 Thus my concern. 

Your concern is fully understood by me as a former wrencher. 👍

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blackout

To be honest, I rarely use a torque wrench and did not on the engine bolts, but I have been wrenching for 33 years and sometimes trust my feel more than a torque wrench with a long leverage arm.  One advantage to anti-sieze is it assures a good bolt clamping force by reducing friction from the threads.  Too much thread friction, and at a given torque value, you do not have enough bolt clamping force, which is what the bolt is there to do.

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3crows

I put this pic in another thread but it is pertinent here as well. You can see the FE I installed from TST and the Womet-Tech slider ensemble:

 

IMG_4463.jpg

 

I went some 15 years without a motorcycle. But my last bike was a Suzuki SV650S. It was hotrodded, lower fairing, inverted forks, 750 kit, Two Brothers full exhaust, Yoshimara FE kit and a bunch of stuff. One night, I worked second shift, it was customary on Thursdays nights (actually Friday morning) for all the motorcycle guys to stop off at the QT for some snacks. I walked back to my Suzuki with hotdog in one hand and a drink in the other and leaned up against it only for it to roll off the kickstand. To this day, I cannot figure it out other than for some reason I did not set it in first as I ALWAYS do. Anyways, it fell on my new lower fairing and cracked it and ruined the paint. Had I installed these type of sliders I would not have had to repair and repaint a fairing. 

 

J

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CarGuy7a

The installation video on their site specs the torque at 38 ft/lbs or 52Nm's.

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DewMan
8 hours ago, CarGuy7a said:

The installation video on their site specs the torque at 38 ft/lbs or 52Nm's.

Do they recommend any particular anti-seize or thread locker as well?

Edited by DewMan

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3crows

The 38 ft lbs seems a little light given the service manual calls for 54. But if lubricated, maybe. 

 

Just for posterity, I used 42 ft lbs with the nickel anti-seize. This torque felt solid and I could feel the slightest hint of bolt stretch. I will check torque after running the motorcycle some.

 

I drove this MT-07 home from the dealer and to the local Y for a total of 60 miles and it has been parked in my garage since. Partly for these mods and partly due to lack of time to ride the thing. 

 

I plan to modify the rear fender fairings to allow install with the rear rack, as it is now they must be removed. This will require my acquisition of another set for standard install without the rack. 

 

J

Edited by 3crows

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CarGuy7a
On 9/1/2018 at 9:54 AM, DewMan said:

Do they recommend any particular anti-seize or thread locker as well?

I didn't see any recommendations nor did I use any. There wasn't any on the factory bolts when I removed them. I think the reason they use a lighter torque is the bolts are much longer than the stock ones. Put more torque on a longer bolt and you could start pulling threads out of the engine or snap the bolt off completely.

 

3crows. I think you'll be fine at 42 ft lbs it's not drastically higher than 38.

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