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MT27

2018 Suzuka winning R1

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Beemer

Nice to see them winning, good for Yamaha! The editor mentions that he thinks carbon fiber is a poor material choice for a radiator hose. I'm no expert on it either but I'm thinking (and maybe I'm wrong) that compared to a thick, rubber hose a molded carbon fiber hose would not only be lighter and stronger bust most of all would dissipate the heat better than rubber, therefore keeping the water/engine running cooler through out such a long race. That would be very important. Can anyone with expertise in this field elaborate on it. Does that sound about right or am I way off?

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Liquidmetal

Badass machine.

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gregjet

A carbon fibre reinforced clear "rubber" ( ureathane , silicone or like) would work fine for a flexible hose. Stock rubber has polyester or glass fibre in it.

Could just be a protective cover as noted, to protect the hose in a crash ( innegra or kevlar would be better).

 

Of course it could be a carbon link hose. Steel and aluminium ones are pretty common on bikes , though why you would make one with a glued seam, rather than a wrapped single piece, is beyond me

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MT27

*With the crossplane crankshaft design, and “long band” firing order, the Yamaha YZF-R1 is known as a gas-guzzler, so that has to play into the factory team’s strategy.*

 

Any idea how a cranks firing order hurts mpg?

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norcal616

I believe the carbon fiber hose cover is more for crash protection, thermal management of fluid and possibly to help keep the hose vibrations down which decreases the like hood of material failure??? 

 

and yes I was a bit puzzled by the gus guzzler comment- only thing I can think of is the amount of HP/TQ being generated across a broader rpm range than other bikes?? ( with engine sizes being fairly equal and bike/rider weight) 

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pattonme
15 hours ago, gregjet said:

Could just be a protective cover as noted, to protect the hose in a crash ( innegra or kevlar would be better).

upvote on sliding protection. Endurance racing is all about minimizing damage and minimizing the time to repair. Carbon is slippery and the hard shell probably deals better with gravel than rubber hose. It might be a carbon+kevlar weave, who knows. Or some youngster thought "needs more cowbell^H^H^H^Hcarbon fiber" and just festooned it wherever he possibly could. The switchgear covers in carbon is just asinine IMO.

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Beemer

It dawned on me a minute ago that maybe there would be something of value in the comments sections about the hoses and there was.

>>> Gazorpian • a day ago

"As an ex-design engineering Intern for Force India F1 team. Those hoses are straight out of F1. They basically act as bracing and protective element for actual hoses within it. The actual hoses within the CFRP bracing are atleast 50% thinner than standard hoses. Even with the bracing the weight saving per hose is just about a pound. Another upside is heat rejection is improved a little. Only downside is if the bracing breaks during a fall or so, the next fall will be fatal for the hose inside. And it's a time consuming process to create that CFRP hose. I guess every little ounce of weight saving is important at suzuka. F1 nowadays use woven CFRP hoses, still time consuming to create CF strands. But are flexible and don't break that easily. Than the straight up molded one piece used in the R1 above."

 

So, it's just a shield with the benefit of rejecting some heat and a little weight savings but at the risk of getting broken if the bike goes down. 

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MT27

The winning R1 needed 2 extra fuel stops. What does that work out to,

needing to lap 1 sec a lap quicker?

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