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Blake

MT-07 2018 My first bike, any tips on how to not die?

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Blake

I was a die hard car guy until recently. Any tips would be appreciated, and any mod recommendations would be great since a lot of modifications say 2017 fz-07 and older. 

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Cruizin
18 minutes ago, Blake said:

I was a die hard car guy until recently. Any tips would be appreciated, and any mod recommendations would be great since a lot of modifications say 2017 fz-07 and older. 

Moving this to the new rider's advice section. 

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angus

Congrats on picking a great bike!   

 

You mentioned mods and how not to die, training was already covered so I'll move on to mods. 

          My favorite mod is also something that I believe makes an MT07 a better beginners bike and easier to learn on. I would recommend looking into a computer re-flash , I had 2wdw  do mine and I love it. https://fz07.org/forum/52/wheel-dynoworks-mail-ecu-flashing/

 My bike is stock except for the flash and it is so much smoother now and the excessive engine braking is all but gone!  It has allowed me to focus on things like cornering while knowing that the bike will be predictable. 

 

 If you put out some more background information about your preferences and riding aspirations I'm sure that you'll get a lot of great feedback from the members and admins here on this forum.  

 

 

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Zephyr
5 hours ago, Cruizin said:

Welcome to the forum.  You can ask questions and we will do our best to answer them.  

 

I have been riding since 1974 on dirtbikes, streetbikes since 1983.  I have lost 7 people in my life from motorcycle accidents. All but three were due to rider error. And one would had lived if he had been wearing a full face helmet. 

 

Please, read my following advice. 

 

1. Gear.  When you are riding, look down for a second at the pavement going by. You are floating on the worlds biggest power sander. When you go down, the first issue is imapct, then it becomes about your clothes and skin being ground away from your body. So, when you are looking down, ask yourself if your gear is good enough to survive impact AND the skid. 

The VERY FIRST UPGRADE YOU SHOULD GET IS THE BEST GEAR THAT YOU CAN AFFORD. Period. 

Screw ECU flashing, screw exhaust, screw seat, screw anything else that does not protect you during a crash or laydown at speed. Jeans melt into your skin and get sanded away as you slide on pavement. 

 

Below are links to nothing but closeout pricing on outstanding good riding gear that is all on sale! 

 

 

I suggest buying from Revzilla because if something doesn't fit, they have the very best return policies. Cycle Gear is good as well, but avoid most of their Bilt products. Some will argue with me, but its the truth. 

 

Helmets   I only wear helmets that are ECE 22.05 rated. DOT rating means nothing. 

HERE ARE LINKS TO NOTHING BUT ECE 22.05 RATED HELMETS, MANY ON SALE. 

 

 

OK, now that you have good protective gear on the way, it is time for you to sign up for a good motorcycle class. I can see from your ip address that you are from Florida (don't worry, all websites show your ip address to the admin) 

Be smart, sign up for a class ASAP https://www.flhsmv.gov/driver-licenses-id-cards/motorcycle-rider-education-endorsements/florida-rider-training-program-courses/

 

Go find a parking lot, a big empty one and practice stopping and swerving at 35 mph. Then, start practicing at 55 mph. Over and over again.

 

When riding, what kills most new riders is this fact. Whatever you are looking at, is where your bike will go. So, be looking 20 yards ahead or farther, and only where you want to go. Notice an obstacle or a car or a kid? Dont stare at it or you will run right into it. Always look at the exit, look only at where you want to go. 

 

Have fun, be safe and dont be in a hurry to upgrade your bike. Be in a hurry to get to know everything about it. 

 

Spent a good amount of time on this forum, tech tips section has everything you need to know about this bike. 

 

Also, use the search feature to look up questions before asking them, the subject has probably already been covered. 

 

And, take a sec and upload a profile pic so you dont look like a newb. And place your pin on the memebr map!

 

WELCOME! you are gonna love that bike!! 

This basically should be required reading in order to post on this website.  It is that good.  Kudos to you sir.

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robbo10

Never rush a decision (unless you are forced to!). Take time to assess a situation. Then go. Also, be aware that you are invisible to other road users and that they take no responsibility whatever for your longevity.

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Just do it! 

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Littlebriar

If you can't do training, there are some very good books out there. One of the best for a novice rider is "Proficient Motorcycling" by David Hough. He's got several other books on the subject too.

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Steve, 2017 Yamaha FZ-07, 2016 BMW 1200RT, Harbor Beach, Michigan

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Blake
12 hours ago, tavisb said:

Welcome to the site Blake. Have you taken a MSF class?

Not yet

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JRFlurry

Obviously, I'll agree with the others on both general safety and getting the right gear to keep you alive. Other than that, and even this surprised me, getting a good tune on this particular bike mikes things much "safer". A good tune will reduce the jerkiness of the throttle and you can reduce the (VERY) heavy engine braking. It makes this bike far more predictable which in turn make things "safer" in my opinion. Pair that with a loud pipe so ppl know you're near them (loud pipes save lives) and you've successfully made your new bike safer and gained a few ponies as well!

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Blake
11 hours ago, Cruizin said:

Welcome to the forum.  You can ask questions and we will do our best to answer them.  

 

I have been riding since 1974 on dirtbikes, streetbikes since 1983.  I have lost 7 people in my life from motorcycle accidents. All but three were due to rider error. And one would had lived if he had been wearing a full face helmet. 

 

Please, read my following advice. 

 

1. Gear.  When you are riding, look down for a second at the pavement going by. You are floating on the worlds biggest power sander. When you go down, the first issue is imapct, then it becomes about your clothes and skin being ground away from your body. So, when you are looking down, ask yourself if your gear is good enough to survive impact AND the skid. 

The VERY FIRST UPGRADE YOU SHOULD GET IS THE BEST GEAR THAT YOU CAN AFFORD. Period. 

Screw ECU flashing, screw exhaust, screw seat, screw anything else that does not protect you during a crash or laydown at speed. Jeans melt into your skin and get sanded away as you slide on pavement. 

 

Below are links to nothing but closeout pricing on outstanding good riding gear that is all on sale! 

 

 

I suggest buying from Revzilla because if something doesn't fit, they have the very best return policies. Cycle Gear is good as well, but avoid most of their Bilt products. Some will argue with me, but its the truth. 

 

Helmets   I only wear helmets that are ECE 22.05 rated. DOT rating means nothing. 

HERE ARE LINKS TO NOTHING BUT ECE 22.05 RATED HELMETS, MANY ON SALE. 

 

 

OK, now that you have good protective gear on the way, it is time for you to sign up for a good motorcycle class. I can see from your ip address that you are from Florida (don't worry, all websites show your ip address to the admin) 

Be smart, sign up for a class ASAP https://www.flhsmv.gov/driver-licenses-id-cards/motorcycle-rider-education-endorsements/florida-rider-training-program-courses/

 

Go find a parking lot, a big empty one and practice stopping and swerving at 35 mph. Then, start practicing at 55 mph. Over and over again.

 

When riding, what kills most new riders is this fact. Whatever you are looking at, is where your bike will go. So, be looking 20 yards ahead or farther, and only where you want to go. Notice an obstacle or a car or a kid? Dont stare at it or you will run right into it. Always look at the exit, look only at where you want to go. 

 

Have fun, be safe and dont be in a hurry to upgrade your bike. Be in a hurry to get to know everything about it. 

 

Spent a good amount of time on this forum, tech tips section has everything you need to know about this bike. 

 

Also, use the search feature to look up questions before asking them, the subject has probably already been covered. 

 

And, take a sec and upload a profile pic so you dont look like a newb. And place your pin on the memebr map!

 

WELCOME! you are gonna love that bike!! 

Thanks for taking the time to write this! I appreciate it

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tavisb
30 minutes ago, Blake said:

Not yet

Definitely get in one as soon as you can. You'll learn a lot that will help keep you safe.

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pegasus46

Mom always said, "Don't run with scissors".

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topazsparrow

Mandatory viewing once you start working on your riding skills (after your road skills)

 

 

 

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gregjet

Often agree with Cruizin but in this case I have to differ considerably on one point. For any real beginner with no experience, I strongly believe this bike is not a desirable bike, unless the ecu is reflashed. Not for the purpose of getting more power, but because the fuelling makes the throttle extremely jerky. Check out the youtube videos, and even seasoned riders are wheelstanding the bike all over the place. A proper reflash will not just improve the smoothness of the throttle response but allow you to get used to the directness on motorcycle throttle/bike response. Coming from cars, you are used to low power/weight ratios smoothing even very badly fuelled throttles.

Other than that, what he said about protective gear and others have said about proper riding courses and Twist of the Wrist are all pretty useful and desirable.

Note: Suspension is much more important on a bike than cars, and this one will reward you for chucking money at it sensibly.

You picked a doozey of a bike for a first one. With the fueling fixed it will give you a truly fun bike.

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Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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topazsparrow
16 minutes ago, gregjet said:

Often agree with Cruizin but in this case I have to differ considerably on one point. For any real beginner with no experience, I strongly believe this bike is not a desirable bike, unless the ecu is reflashed. Not for the purpose of getting more power, but because the fuelling makes the throttle extremely jerky. Check out the youtube videos, and even seasoned riders are wheelstanding the bike all over the place. A proper reflash will not just improve the smoothness of the throttle response but allow you to get used to the directness on motorcycle throttle/bike response. Coming from cars, you are used to low power/weight ratios smoothing even very badly fuelled throttles.

Other than that, what he said about protective gear and others have said about proper riding courses and Twist of the Wrist are all pretty useful and desirable.

Note: Suspension is much more important on a bike than cars, and this one will reward you for chucking money at it sensibly.

You picked a doozey of a bike for a first one. With the fueling fixed it will give you a truly fun bike.

Maybe you guys have better gas or something where you live... but I can't possibly fathon the front end of this biking coming up on it's own - let alone unexpectedly in any other gear than 1st. Even in first you have to be doing it intentionally to get that kind of reaction.

 

Yeah it's an easy bike to wheelie and it has a decent hunk of torque to it... but nobody is going to accidentally wheelie it without trying or riding carelessly in some capacity. Even if you could, it's certainly not going to loop itself or do anything crazy.

Edited by topazsparrow
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gregjet

Topaz, check out the youtube video reviews. First thing I noticed before I bought it. Yeah we do actually have better fuel ( found that out with tuning Sally's KTM 690 Duke and the settings trying to use international guides), but even the US and Euro vids show the same thing.

It is possible that the US bike have different mapping though ( hadn't considered that before you commented). Wouldn't be the first time and California regs are noted for changing stuff on motor vehicles.

I have been riding and racing for over 40 years ( since I was 19) and it did it to me , same as a few of the vids. until I reflashed it.  Particularly nasty when accelerating from a closed/trailing throttle to acc out of a corner. Having raced plenty of twostrokes I was fine with it, but not a good trait for beginners.


Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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topazsparrow
4 minutes ago, gregjet said:

Topaz, check out the youtube video reviews. First thing I noticed before I bought it. Yeah we do actually have better fuel ( found that out with tuning Sally's KTM 690 Duke and the settings trying to use international guides), but even the US and Euro vids show the same thing.

It is possible that the US bike have different mapping though ( hadn't considered that before you commented). Wouldn't be the first time and California regs are noted for changing stuff on motor vehicles.

I have been riding and racing for over 40 years ( since I was 19) and it did it to me , same as a few of the vids. until I reflashed it.  Particularly nasty when accelerating from a closed/trailing throttle to acc out of a corner. Having raced plenty of twostrokes I was fine with it, but not a good trait for beginners.

Beginners aren't riding like that though. They're not compressing the front end and then nailing it on corner exits (which is what is required to lift the front end up in 2nd - or power wheelies). If a beginner rider is riding like that, they're going to have issues no matter what size bike they are on as they lack the skills to control the bike and correct for conditions.

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pattonme
24 minutes ago, topazsparrow said:

Maybe you guys have better gas or something where you live... but I can't possibly fathon the front end of this biking coming up on it's own

ahem, I've got plenty of students who managed to wheelie a CB250 Nighthawk on the range at 0-15mph before either looping it or having the scariest bronco ride of their fleeting lives.

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gregjet

Topaz. That's pretty much the point though. They don't have any skills, because they are beginners. This bike can accentuate the poor throttle control markedly ( as pattonme noted).

I still believe that beginners should be limited to 250cc ( less than 40HP) bikes. It teaches them to ride and use the throttle and maintain speed through corners without such a big risk. It used to be that way here but was shelved for the new LAMS rules, that allow bikes like the Aus MT07 ( it different from everywhere else . It is a slightly smaller capacity detuned version. The full version is called the MT07 HO...).

Having taught a LOT of first timers over the decades , personally I feel the throttle response is not safe for beginner road riders, unless they are ex dirt bike riders , then they are fine. The bike reminds me of the RD's and the RG's in terms of the speed of response , if you make a mistake, you don't get to correct it, because it has already done it

Edited by gregjet
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Go forth and modify my son...go forth and modify...

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FZ07R WaNaB
42 minutes ago, topazsparrow said:

but nobody is going to accidentally wheelie it without trying or riding carelessly in some capacity

OMG, I couldn't disagree more!!! 

 

I have an extensive dirt bike background (mostly 2-strokes) from age 13 to the present and I'm 60. I had/have many occasions where I have accidentally wheelied my FZ in both 1st and 2nd gear. They were totally power wheelies not clutch-up ones. I tell people that it's not a function of can the FZ wheelie, but much more a function of how good you are with the rear brake to bring the front end down especially in 1st gear. I'm getting old enough that I respect my body too much to screw around in 1st which also includes redlining 1st and speed shifting into 2nd. I do play around with wheelies in 2nd when the devil tells me to. I can easily (very) get a 1-2' ones by hitting 5-6K in 2nd, fully back off and crack it... and that ain't a full throttle crack either.

 

In  case you are wondering, my bike has a 2WDW flash with the stock exhaust and the snorkel removed so it's not much past stock regarding power. Having said that, I've ridden two other FZs which have pipes and other work done to them. My bike is faster than one and as fast as the other one. Maybe I either got one of the good ones and/or I broke it in well.

 

I totally agree with gregjet on this not being a good beginners bike especially pre-flash. Between the spastic throttle, engine braking and the torgue kick, it is really easy to screw up on this bike.

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topazsparrow

I'll concede that there are better beginner bikes for sure. I didn't mean to suggest the opposite of that.

 

I suppose I'm just trying to voice my opposition to the tired hyperbole that modern motorcycles that don't have scooter engines in them are uncontrollable wheelie death machines.

 

"I tell people that it's not a function of can the FZ wheelie, but much more a function of how good you are with the rear brake to bring the front end down especially in 1st gear."

 

This is a GROSS exaggeration. Nowhere within the realm of reality. First gear will only come up if you're dangerously careless with the throttle - speaking of throttle, the stock tube breaks your wrist before you can open it all the way. Even aggressive roll on's in first won't yield wheelies if you're not 6'3 and or 220+ sitting at the very back of the bike. You essentially can't wheelie in 2nd gear without chopping the throttle first or clutching it. You MIGHT be able to get the front end up ever so slightly or get it light, but it's nowhere near the "OMG IM LOOPING IT" surprise you guys are trying to make it out to be.

 

Too much bike for beginners? Maybe the ones with zero prior riding experience. Constant wheelies and in danger of looping it if your foot isn't on the rear brake 100% of the time? come on.. don't be silly.

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FZ07R WaNaB
3 minutes ago, topazsparrow said:

This is a GROSS exaggeration. Nowhere within the realm of reality.

So what, am I lying - WTF???  Why would I saw that if I wasn't serious? Everything I said has been my experience with my FZ-07. I'm a 60 year old guy who has been riding for 47 years. I've ridden/owned my share of 250 and 500 class 2-stroke MX bikes, so I know what the hell a wheelie is about!

 

Sorry you got either a lemon, or you lack the balls to see what the FZ is easily capable of, but don't blantantly call me a liar!

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topazsparrow
2 minutes ago, FZ07R WaNaB said:

So what, am I lying - WTF???  Why would I saw that if I wasn't serious? Everything I said has been my experience with my FZ-07. I'm a 60 year old guy who has been riding for 47 years. I've ridden/owned my share of 250 and 500 class 2-stroke MX bikes, so I know what the hell a wheelie is about!

 

Sorry you got either a lemon, or you lack the balls to see what the FZ is easily capable of, but don't blantantly call me a liar!

I didn't call you a liar. It's possible you're 220 lbs and sit on the back seat while you ride I guess. Maybe you ride around with 100 lbs of gear on the back or something too. 

 

Riders who fall within the range of normal (150 - 190 lbs @ 5'10) are not riding around with their foot covering their back brake just in case of an unexpected wheelie from an FZ-07. It's not a matter of having a hot bike from the factory or not. What you've described is something most super sports don't even do, let alone a parallel twin 689cc. You're litterally trying to make it sound like the slightest sneeze will bring the front wheel up uncontrollably at a moments notice. You're either trolling or you're delusional.

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pattonme
30 minutes ago, topazsparrow said:

What you've described is something most super sports don't even do

Per a recent MotoGP2 rider opining on the torque of the new Triumph 765 motors for the class, "the current 600's can't pull the skin off a rice pudding." And yet YouTube is full of video proof that riders of even modest experience can successfully wheelie  without undue effort.

Edited by pattonme

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