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  1. DISCLAIMER This was a summary of my experience following the shop manual. You should know that this is a procedure with major potential for damaging your engine if you do this incorrectly. What follows is intended to supplement the shop manual, not replace it. The shop manual is absolutely required for this service as it provides exact steps necessary and corresponding torque values for fasteners and heaps of other useful bits of information and helpful diagrams. Perform this service at your own risk. You should be familiar with taking apart your bike for other service before you begin. You should have a firm grasp of how an engine's valve train works to understand what you are doing and why. Tools/supplies you'll need: Yamaha's FZ07 factory service manual 7.48mm OD valve shims - buy a kit or exchange shims with a dealer/shop I used a Hot Cams HCSHIM01 kit. Amazon will say it doesn't fit an FZ07 and they are wrong. 1/4" drive torque wrench 3mm trimmed hex key for cam chain tensioner 2.5mm - 14mm hex drivers or keys 8mm - 13mm box wrenches 8mm - 19mm sockets 14mm deep socket for spark plugs 19mm socket for crankshaft nut (same size as front axle) 1/4" socket extensions, wobble Extendable magnet to pull spark plugs New cam chain tensioner gasket (if you want) New valve cover rubber gasket (if you damage the original one) Feeler gauges Vessel to contain drained coolant Big ass pliers for the coolant pipe spring clamps Philips screwdriver for worm hose clamps Plastic zip ties Air compressor to blow spark plug wells clean (optional) Funnel (optional if you're brave) Gasket sealant or grease (optional if your gasket behaves and stays in place) Procedure Drain coolant. Allow the coolant to drain while you complete the next steps. Remove plastic body work. Remove gas tank fasteners (1, 2), breather hoses (3), and front electronic sensor connection (4) Lift up gas tank to remove fuel pump connector (1), then lift and rotate gas tank counter clockwise and rest on cardboard on the frame. Rest the aluminum bendy tabs back where they were fastened, and the black steel portion on the cardboard. Whatever direction you twist it, be sure that when you replace it, you twist the opposite direction. You could remove the tank if you'd like but that requires removing the fuel line from the tank. Now that the coolant has drained, replace the drain bolt and begin removing the radiator. Remove the fairings, radiator guard (if equipped), and the single bolt on the throttle side (1). The radiator hands on 1 rubber grommet on the clutch side, 1 rubber grommet near the triple tree, and the single bolt you just removed. There's an inlet hose on the top clutch side, an outlet hose on the bottom throttle side, and the small overflow line near the cap. Remove each of these lines however you wish - I removed the bike-side connections for each hose, not the radiator-side, but it doesn't really matter. Remove the horn's electrical connections (2), and the fan motor connection (3). The radiator probably has some residual coolant left, be ready with paper towels. Gently place it on some cardboard with the hose connections facing up (4). Remove the clutch cable guide (1). You're now ready to remove the spark plugs. Unplug each coil (1) and tape each plug to the frame so you remember which side is which! Pull the coils by hand only. Then pull the plugs using a 14mm deep socket and wobble extensions. When removing the coils and plugs, mark on a big sheet of cardboard which coil is which (2) so you know it all goes back together when it was removed from. If you're doing this service, I hope you've removed them once already and left yourself some silicone grease or similar on the rubber boot seal so they're not so hard to remove. Remove the crankcase breather hose (1). Remove valve cover bolts in a criss-cross pattern (1). Zip tie various wiring harnesses, cables, etc out of the way before you begin. Then wiggle and lever out the valve cover without damaging the rubber gasket (2). Place the valve cover gasket side up on cardboard. Remove the crankshaft end cover with 14mm hex driver, and remove riming mark access cover (1). Use 19mm socket and turn crankshaft counter clockwise until timing mark on flywheel aligns with mark on crankcase cover (2), and marks on intake cam sprocket (3) and exhaust cam sprocket (4) all align. Your engine should now be in the service position for valve check and adjustment. DO NOT TURN THE CRANKSHAFT ONCE YOU REMOVE THE CAM CHAIN TENSIONER. THIS WILL MISTIME YOUR ENGINE AND YOU WILL HAVE TO RETIME IT. By having 4 known reference points, the engine can be timed correctly if you make a mistake - ask me how I know. The reference points are, in order of verification: 1. timing mark on flywheel/crankcase (crankshaft position), 2. piston #1 (clutch side) at TDC of compression stroke (you can place something gently through spark plug hole to rest on the piston crown and turn the engine to visualize the peak of travel when the timing mark is aligned incidating TDC of compression stroke), 3. the intake camshaft timing alignment mark (parallel with head edge), 4. the exhaust camshaft alignment mark (parallel with head edge). Now you're ready to begin checking the valve clearances. If you haven't done so already, plug the spark plug holes and the coolant output hose (1). Note that the lobes of piston #1 (clutch side) are not engaging the valve lifters ("buckets") at all. Slide the feeler gauges between the buckets and the cam lobes to measure the clearance (2). Intake should be 0.11-0.20 mm, exhaust should be 0.24-0.30 mm. You're looking for something between "no-go" and "slides right through". The gauge should kind of "stick" in-between the two. You'll "feel" what I mean - that's why they're called feeler gauges. Begin writing these down on a diagram that is explicitly clear which piston is which, and which valve is which. When you're sure of the measurement, rotate the crankshaft 270 degrees counter clockwise and measure piston #2. You could use one of those paper angle wheels or if you're like me you don't have one. I just very gently placed a long hex wrench through the spark plug hole onto the piston crown and rotated what felt like 270 degrees until I saw the piston's peak of travel visualized by the hex wrench beginning to go back down (3). If you do this do not let the angle of the hex wrench catch underneath the camshaft caps! Measure the clearance just as piston #1 and record. If your valves are all within spec, you're done! Put everything back together by following the steps in reverse order. If not, proceed to adjustment.
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