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roosterxp

FZ07 Engine Brake questions

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roosterxp
Hey guys, Im loving my FZ07, 180mi on the odometer and loving every mile!  I do have a question:
Do your guys' bikes kinda feel like an on/off switch when you're on and off the throttle?  
My engine braking is huge.. if i let off the throttle in any gear it slows down HARD!   If im downshifting and going from 3rd to 2nd my rear wheel chirps!  Im between 4000-6000 rpms.  
Is there any way to turn down the engine braking?  

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YZEtc
The easiest way around that is blipping the throttle while downshifting in order to better match engine revs to rear wheel speed as you release the clutch lever with each downshift.
Either that, or simply downshift with the engine RPM at a much lower speed, as you would do when riding very gently.
 
The engine braking is normal for this bike, and reminds me very much of the big Thumper (single-cylindered 4-stroke) dirt bikes and dual-purpose bikes I rode years ago.
I actually like it, myself.
 
I have not tried it, but many on this forum claim an ECU reflash greatly reduces this to non-issue status.
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vroomvroom
The engine breaking was a big reason why I had my ECU reflashed. It makes a big difference in reducing the severity of on/off choppiness at lower gears. The bike now runs very smooth.
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Beemer
Also, if the situation allows, you can just slow down with your brakes first and bring your speed down considerably before you start with the downshifting. I do that all the time, it's just not necessary to downshift with the rpm's up unless you have to. E.G. AT 60 mph. I will slow down to around 30 sometimes before I start down shifting. When your rpm is lower it doesn't engine brake quite as much, although, you still want to rev match with the throttle or you can still get that wheel lock-up chirp and engine brake drag. It's just noob operator error. You'll work it out. GL! and stay frosty! ;)  
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faffi
I love the engine braking, hardly ever touch the brakes. But with the EJK throttle pickup is smooth, not jerky.
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ShiftHer
I love the engine braking, hardly ever touch the brakes. But with the EJK throttle pickup is smooth, not jerky.
Agreed, I held off on installing EJK for several months after installing my exhaust because it felt good enough as it was. But after installing EJK (and I'm sure ECU flash would do the same or better), throttle delivery is smoother. There is still a lot of engine breaking, but it is less like an on/off switch. Before the EJK, I would basically avoid downshifting into 1st (unless at a stop, of course) because it was so abrupt. But with EJK, I can blip throttle and downshift to first and not be bucked off. Part of it is practice and getting used to the way the bike rides, and part of it is the fuel delivery.
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ralph
Nothing wrong or special about the engine braking, either you are not changing down correctly
matching the revs to the lower gear or the engine is not picking up fast enough or stalling when
you blip the throttle which is what I suspect, and why riders report not having the problem
after a re flash or some such. But it is not good for this type of gear box to just bang it down a
gear and not do what you call rev matching it is a constant mesh box but not a syncro one.
You can get bikes that blip the throttle for you but not at 07 money.
 

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mjh937
I second the @2wheeldynoworks ECU flash. It was the best mod I have done. It reduced the engine braking to a more normal level and smoothed out the throttle response immensely. @ralph, I think we have more engine braking in the US models than you do in Europe due to the EPA regulations.
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r1limited
Personally I love the engine braking, best way to get the arse to hang out a tad
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i28
Do your guys' bikes kinda feel like an on/off switch when you're on and off the throttle?   If im downshifting and going from 3rd to 2nd my rear wheel chirps!  Im between 4000-6000 rpms. 

1. The engine braking can teach you not to treat the throttle as an on/off switch. I always try and keep the throttle a little open and don't have this issue as much anymore. Also, you can focus on working the clutch and throttle together for smoother power (so it's not as jerky). 2. If you're chirping the back wheel then you may be quickly locking it because you're shifting down too soon (at too high of an RPM). Shift down a little later (at a lower RPM).
3. If the engine braking is too much, either try and stay a gear higher than what you're used to and it'll decrease the engine braking (or learn to rev match - I'd save rev matching for later since it takes a bit of extra concentration. You're better learning to downshift a little more smoothly without revmatching at first) .
 
You'll slowly understand the bike and what RPM it likes to be at as you keep putting on more miles. Took me a little while to.
 

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peteinpa
ECU reflash solves ALL problems with the running of this bike.
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CarGuy7a
Stock exhaust won't help you much when rev matching downshifts. It's just too quiet to hear. I had the problem of either giving it too much RPM or not enough because I'm used to being able to actually hear the bike. Once I installed my Akra, it made it easy to rev match.
 
Just think. Engine braking will save you money on brake pads LOL. My engine braking was not as harsh after I installed a Power commander and added fuel trim at 0% throttle from 3,000 rpm and up to combat a little bit of decel popping but the braking is still evident which I don't mind at all. But I have heard of getting better results in that area of "engine braking" with a flashed ECU.
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762mm
ECU reflash solves ALL problems with the running of this bike.
 
 
Orly.
 
This bike has no running problems as is.
The only recurring problem I see is LEARN HOW TO RIDE. It is mind blowing to me how easy it is to legally ride bikes in some parts of the world.
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vroomvroom
ECU reflash solves ALL problems with the running of this bike.
Orly.
 
This bike has no running problems as is.
The only recurring problem I see is LEARN HOW TO RIDE. It is mind blowing to me how easy it is to legally ride bikes in some parts of the world.
 
 
The bike runs fine stock. For new riders however, the engine breaking can be a bit strong, particularly during low speed turns, where the throttle can be a tad jerky and possibly lead to losing the rear.
 
This almost happened to me a couple times. I bought an akra ti so I was going to reflash the ecu anyways, but found the flash to make the bike easier to handle.

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r1limited
Orly. 
This bike has no running problems as is.
The only recurring problem I see is LEARN HOW TO RIDE. It is mind blowing to me how easy it is to legally ride bikes in some parts of the world.
The bike runs fine stock. For new riders however, the engine breaking can be a bit strong, particularly during low speed turns, where the throttle can be a tad jerky and possibly lead to losing the rear.
 
This almost happened to me a couple times. I bought an akra ti so I was going to reflash the ecu anyways, but found the flash to make the bike easier to handle.
I gree somewhat!  I agree the engine braking is strong, but the bike is built to not put a whole lot of effort into thinking about it.  I also agree with @762mm somewhat, new riders or experianced riders come in verying forms.  New riders the engine braking may be daunting, so learning to just stay in 3rd around town riding instead of shifting up and down.  The experienced rider can dislike the braking because well that rider is not all that experianced but simply has some saddle time and when the engine braking cause the rear to step out panics and bad things happen.  I expect it to step out, in fact I like it when it does, I use engine braking to my advantage.  IMO its like a TT bike, its a hell of a lot of fun.  When I first got my R1, I purposly set the rev limiter to 10.5k why did I do this? because at 10.51 the damn thing did stuff that would scare the gods.  All hell broke loose and all that 170 plus HP was released, I ride it now with no limits. 
The FZ07 is a timid bike, it is not a race bike, it is not anything more than a purpose built bike to appeal to a specific mindset a new rider may not like it but then a new rider may love it.  Reminds me of a neighbor that had a Honda 650 big red thumper.  He sold it bought a yamaha YZF426.  Scared the hell out of him, so he sold it to me, that bike went nuts when it hit the cam it had such a hard hit at around 8 k and did not stop until the rev limiter kicked in  Man that was one fun freaking bike to ride and race.
 
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barneyfife
I love the engine braking. There was a learning curve when I first rode the bike,but now it works for me.

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tjeepdrv
I think I'm the only person that never noticed it.

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level41
Pretty much what everyone else said:
 
1- Lower RPM before downshifting.
The engine brakes much more intense in 1st to 3rd gear, than in the higher gears.
I personally slow down to near idle RPM (1500-2500 RPM) before downshifting
 
2- Blip throttle
I only blip throttle if I need to remain in the powerband (eg: coming out of a turn and want to maintain speed), or when I'm on the highway and want to shift to 5th or 4th, but even in these gears the rear wheel doesn't lock (unless I'm doing a crazy thing, like trying to shift to 4th gear when doing 120MPH).
 
3- Change sprockets
For a more permanent solution, try putting a 17t front sprocket on the bike.
It will lower RPM and make the bike's response more smooth.
It worked so well for me, I put on a 38t rear with it as well, to double the effect.
But if you go the way of sprocket changes, you can start with a 17t front, and see where that takes you!
 
A lot easier and more affordable than reflashing an ECU.
 
 

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firstyammerha
my Gladius had stronger engine braking and a better exhaust note while doing it.

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ralph
The rear wheel lock,s skip,s chirp,s du to you letting the engine revs drop you let the clutch out
and the rotating bits in the engine, and some are pretty heavy one then have to instantly speed
up to match the speed in that gear, only way to learn this is practice and experience, once
you get the hang of it and it's not the easiest thing to do you will find great satisfaction
in the nice smooth changes and wonder what the hell is wrong with those that cant.

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