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jbird

Clutch cable lubricate?

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jbird
Okay so I lubricated my clutch cable, removed the lever and applied directly into cable housing and hose, and moved the cable up and down several times, by hand..after checking in the morning, residue had trickled down to the opposite end as expected, this usually works for abt 100 m or less, before the clutch lever begins to freeze up again making it a real bear to pull back, and it's getting aggravating, any ideas, or thoughts, am I lubricating this right, please inform

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jerryv
What are you using for cable lube?
 

Okay so I lubricated my clutch cable, removed the lever and applied directly into cable housing and hose, and moved the cable up and down several times, by hand..after checking in the morning, residue had trickled down to the opposite end as expected, this usually works for abt 100 m or less, before the clutch lever begins to freeze up again making it a real bear to pull back, and it's getting aggravating, any ideas, or thoughts, am I lubricating this right, please inform
 

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bmwpowere36m3
You definitely have to do it every so often, but 100 miles seems crazy. Are you washing the bike a lot or riding in rain? I use a Motion Pro cable luber and Champions Choice lube. Put a rag at the cable on the engine-side and squirt for about 5 seconds. Leave the rag in place for a while, till the lube stops dripping down. Lubricate the lever, pivot and metal-end of cable that goes into perch adjuster with Belray waterproof grease.
 
I haven't done it yet on my FZ-07, but on my other street bike I do it once or twice a year…. so about 3k miles. On my dirt bike, its a much more frequent affair.
 
I would inspect the cable and ends to make sure its not fraying. Also make sure the clutch free-play is properly adjusted. Finally make sure it's properly routed and has no kinks. When I do an oil change, I find it makes the clutch effort easier as well…
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mjh937
I have never lubricated my cables in 3,300 miles. They feel the same as they always have. I probably should do it though.

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jbird
Maybe I didn't use enough, I don't know...how would I tell if the cable is frayed, how does that even happen

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jbird
And I have 11k miles, never freq lubed cable or lever very often

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jbird
It's clear to me how the problem developed, it's just aggravating that it should be an easy fix, and as of now doesn't appear so

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jbird
Maybe it's lubricantion in the lever pivot area, how about lithium Greese for that or any other suggestions

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hobbs
Maybe it's lubricantion in the lever pivot area, how about lithium Greese for that or any other suggestions
 
 
Wouldn't hurt to lube the lever pivot. Lithium grease is suitable. Inspect the length of the cable for splits or cracks in the outer sheath.

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rick
If the cables are teflon lined, then you pretty much never have to lube them unless they are subjected to pressure washers and get rusty inside somehow . Had a 14 year old R100RS that was a daily commuter and saw rain routinely as well as road salt far too many times. Never once lubed those cables and they were fine when I sold the bike.
 
BTW, neither the pivot bolt nor the lock nut underneath have to be super tight. Does the lever pivot freely w/o the cable?
 
Have you replaced the bars with ones that are lower? I've noticed in picts of bikes where the bars have been swapped out that both sets of cables have to take on sharper bends.
 
Valvoline makes a synthetic wheel bearing grease that has moly (it's quite dark grey) in it that's perfect to lube those pivots ( as well as shift lever, bra lever etc) . As for the cable, if I was to bother, think I'd just use silicone from a spray can. Believe it or not, Liquid Wrench is a decent cable lube. It also has molybdenum.
 
 
 
 

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jbird
Never replaced bars but I'll check the tightness on the locking nut

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jbird
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Okay disassembled, the lever once again, and regreased with cable life and pivot portions with lith grease, I did, and was surprised to see a small fray between the free play dial adjuster and lever, abt and inch to the butt end of cable, but I don't think it's anything that will cause friction

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bmwpowere36m3
If it's frayed it'll only get worse, might as well replace it sooner than later.

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cndnmax
8 years and 43k miles on my old bike and never once lubed the throttle or clutch cable. Seems like the only people with issues are the ones using lube lol

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YZEtc
Replace the cable.
Period.
 
Make sure it's routed correctly.
 
Sometime, the bike will be dropped on the clutch lever, bending the lever in a way that the hole where the end of the cable connects to the lever gets pinched down over the end of the cable.
This prevents the cable end from pivoting in the hole in the lever as it should when you pull the lever.
This eventually fatigues the cable wire and it frays.That's why the end of the cable has that funny gray-colored nylon-like cover over it - to aid in the pivoting of the cable end within the lever hole.

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